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Tricks of the Game Programming Gurus Paperback – Jul 1994

29 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 1200 pages
  • Publisher: Sams Publishing; Pap/Cdr edition (July 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0672305070
  • ISBN-13: 978-0672305078
  • Product Dimensions: 5.1 x 19 x 23.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 814,633 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By A Customer on 16 April 1999
Format: Paperback
To be honest, I've been programming in many languages since I was in middle school. I have a basic understanding for many programming languages. It was my first time really working with C/C++, and I was able to understand it. The author made everything clear for the reader, yet I do sugguest some programming experience for a better understanding of the code found through out. There are tutorials to be found on the Internet in C/C++. At any rate, I bought this book some time after it was published. It makes for a nice reference to graphics programming in both 2d and 3d graphics. It introduce the reader to some very basic concepts by todays standards. When this book came out, it was and excellent read; nevertheless, there are all sorts of new tricks out today that are not covered. Read this if you want to learn the general make up of a video game. Don't expect design concpets or anything else. These are the graphics, sound, and AI programming routines, which made some games like Id Software's first 1st person shooter popular. Great book for building a foundation. Don't expect to be programming windows when you are through... On the whole, I have no regret in buying this book. Good to have it in my book case. I still pick it up every now and then.
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By A Customer on 8 Jun. 1998
Format: Paperback
This book is a great introduction to 2D programming and the basics of the video card (but only in mode 13h, 320X200). It covered numerous 2D topics such as scaling, rotating, translating, scrolling techniques, etc. But, I thought this book would go further into 3D game programming since that is more present in current games. He talkes about 3D programming in the 6th chapter and then never gets back to it. I didn't learn how to make a ray casting engine from this single chapter. It showed some mathematical functions explained some theorys, showed me the source code for a real, functioning ray caster and then got right back into 2D special effects! I didn't learn any 3D game programming techniques from this book and it left me searching for another book that focuses on 3D.
If you are a beginner and know nothing about 2D or 3D graphics, buy this book. But, if you know all you want to know about 2D graphics, go looking for another book that explains 3D graphics in depth like one of the OpenGL or Direct3D books.
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By A Customer on 4 Aug. 1999
Format: Paperback
Although dated now, this book is still one of the books I love the most in my collection.
Lamothe starts in each chapter with a new topic and gradually solves the problems as they arise with summaries and other notes. A basic knowledge of C and how to work computers obviously will stand you in good stead but even an amature, with determination can pick this book up and really learn from it. Lamothe tends to spring little details on you at the last moment so be sure to read every chapter at least twice.
As I said it is a bit old but helps you understand the basics of the VGA card mode 13h, yadda yadda.... Graphics and all other games aspects are covered, even 3D has a little coverage.
The Video Games Industry is an impossible thing to follow as advances are every where and a new book is an old book overnight but Lamothe has made a brilliant stab at this.... and succeeded.
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By A Customer on 25 Aug. 1998
Format: Paperback
Andre LaMothe does an excellent job at making complex concepts easy. In just first third of the book, he has taken the reader from a basic C programmer to someone skilled enough to make their own VGA DOS game. But that's the main problem with this book; if you had it in 1990, you could have become King of the game-programming world, but in 1998 you can't use many of the skills to do much more than write a fun game to impress your friends. Most professional games are now written for Windows 95, and absolutely none of them use a Wolfenstein-style ray-casting engine like the one to which half the book is dedicated. If you just want to have fun and make a computer game, it's perfect, but if you want to make money or further your career, you should find a more up-to-date Direct X book.
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Format: Paperback
I first read this book a few years ago, soon after it was published. It was a good read, explaining the concepts of game programming in a clear and concise way. The sections on DOS programming are largely obsolete, although the concepts will certainly usefull if you intend to program for DirectX, as the methods used are similar.
The ray-casting engine is quite simple, and not enough detail is provided for you to write a complete game. I felt that this section of the book is too specific, and doesn't give much information on expanding this basic engine, although it would provide a good grounding for moving onto more advanced books on 3D programming.
Overall, an enjoyable read, but some of the detail leaves a little to be desired.
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By A Customer on 10 Oct. 1998
Format: Paperback
This is the first book I picked up when I had the vaguest idea of turning my programming skills towards game writing. In no time I had some pretty cool stuff running. I docked a star because some of the code (at least on the CD anyway) was incorrect and Lamothe doesn't help you out when it comes to different C compiler syntax. In addition, sometimes he'll leave out the smallest piece of information which will make you spin your wheels for a few days until you figure it out on your own. As someone else said, this book is dated now and I'm looking at his new "Dummies" book for advice on DirectX topics related to Windows. "Gurus" tends to revolve around mode 13h... a limitation to its usefulness in 1998.
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