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Tribes: We need you to lead us Paperback – 6 Nov 2008


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Product details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Piatkus (6 Nov 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0749939753
  • ISBN-13: 978-0749939755
  • Product Dimensions: 13.6 x 1.2 x 21.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (54 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 17,740 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Seth Godin is the author of Tribes, The Dip, Purple Cow, All Marketers Are Liars and other international bestsellers that have changed the way business people think and act. He's the most influential business blogger in the world and consistently one of the twenty-five most widely read bloggers in the English language. He's also the founder and CEO of Squidoo.com and a very popular speaker. He lives in Westchester, New York.

Product Description

Review

Godin's simple manifesto for success and happiness is inspiring. (FINANCIAL TIMES)

Book Description

The bestselling business guru who brought us Purple Cow and The Dip offers his first (and totally unique) book about leadership.

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Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Ricard Codina Graño on 3 Jan 2010
Format: Paperback
Seth Godin has great ideas, and the idea of leading a tribe to make change happen is another one of them. The issue is that this book could have 5 or 10 pages instead of 131. It would share exactly the same knowledge. Going for the same over and over again with lousy examples is what's made me got really tired. It's boring, exactly what he claims not to do. I won't spread the word, or at least not positevely.
Seth, this idea is worth a post, but not a book. Think it through for the future.

A (little disappointed)fan
Ricard
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29 of 31 people found the following review helpful By sadgrove on 9 Jun 2009
Format: Paperback
The difference between a book and a blog is that a book has a narrative or an argument; whereas a blog is a series of thoughts, not necessarily connected.

And narrative is what's lacking in this book. Like Seth's other works, it seems to have been taken from blogs written over time. Many of the headings cover similar ground, so the book becomes repetitive.

And because there's no argument, the central idea of the book never really develops. Seth just keeps looking at the subject from different angles.

This is frustrating, and it's a shame, because Seth Godin is an original thinker and this book is a good example of the clarity with which he can see 21st issues, especially as they relate to the online world.

Seth also shies away from making any practical suggestions about how to create a Tribe.

However, the book is good on Leadership. If you're interested in that subject, it's not a bad read.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Sulkyblue on 6 Nov 2009
Format: Paperback
Seth Godin's books have always been a little like reading a three page presentation that's been turned into a hundred and fifty pages by just repeating the same message over and over and over again. This one was even worse. It didn't actually read like a book, it read like someone's collection of blog posts or notes on an idea that have been prepared to be crafted into a book, but someone forgot to actually do it. There's no coherent message beyond "groups of people working together are stronger than alone" which isn't particularly revolutionary anyway. There's absolutely no narrative, no flow, no story. I felt like I was being shouted at by an obsessed blog which was trying to indoctrinating me into a cult.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Dermot Greene at Geekspeak Training on 1 Jan 2011
Format: Paperback
Seth Godin is the living, breathing embodiment of this book, he is a leader, he's not happy with the status quo and he has built up a tribe of followers who believe in the same ideas as he does. A tribe who will probably read and buy and possibly even worship everything he says or does.

Unfortunately this book is a bit of a one-trick pony, the concept is good, his arguments are relevant and his examples illustrate his points perfectly but.... it only has one idea and that idea (as other reviewers have noted) could probably have been covered in a few pages or in a blog entry but instead has been stretched though endless repetition to 130 pages of wasted paper.

To save you some money and the environment, here is a summary of the book:

1. don't stay with the same ol' same ol'
2. take a chance
3. change is good
4. be a leader
5. create a tribe of followers
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Hannes Buhrmann on 12 Feb 2010
Format: Paperback
I found this book frustrating and inspirational at the same time. Anyone who expects a textbook on how to become a leader will feel disappointed. Anyone who ever had a strong conviction and found an excuse not to push the idea, like me, will feel guilty. Anyone who still has a strong conviction in an idea, or in themselves, will find inspiration.

I don't exactly know what Seth's motives with the structure of the book is, but the blurb on the back cover perhaps says it all "Tribes is for those who don't want to be sheep and instead have a desire to do fresh and exciting work". Fresh and exciting per definition cannot follow a tried and trusted recipe. So don't expect one from Seth. Apply your own intellect and knowledge to the hints, reassurances, admonishments, and challenges in this book, and you WILL find value. But only if you are willing to do most of the thinking work yourself.

In a 2010 interview, Seth said about his own writing that it becomes better if he writes like he talks. He is predisposed to an audience who understands what he talks about, as opposed to an audience who needs twice as much explanation. I think in his writing he is focusing on the act of "tightening his tribe" rather than succumbing to the temptation of making the tribe bigger - page 44, "Tighter".

After all, not everyone wants to be a leader. If you don't want to be one, don't read the book.

Final thought - halfway through the book, I couldn't help but recognise a strong correlation between "Tribes" and the story of Jesus as told in the four Gospels. Uncanny how incredibly well Jesus fits his description of a tribal leader .... Seth is a modern Apostle.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Robert Morris TOP 500 REVIEWER on 5 Nov 2008
Format: Hardcover
Seth Godin's books and blog provide a wealth of information, observations, opinions, and (especially) challenges that can help others to overcome what James O'Toole so aptly characterizes as "the ideology of comfort and the tyranny of custom." In this, his most recent book, he urges his reader to consider and then take full advantage of unprecedented opportunities to become a leader. He cites five different but related reasons: "everyone in an organization - not just the boss - is expected to lead," in today's workplace "it's easier than ever before to change things [and] individuals have more leverage than ever before," those and their organizations that "change things and create remarkable products and services" are rewarded in the marketplace, change initiatives are "engaging, thrilling, profitable and fun," and most of all, there is a "tribe" of other people waiting for a leader "to connect them to one another and lead them where they want to go."

In this context, I am reminded of a passage from Lao-Tzu's Tao Te Ching:

"Learn from the people
Plan with the people
Begin with what they have
Build on what they know
Of the best leaders
When the task is accomplished
The people will remark
We have done it ourselves. "

This is precisely what Godin has in mind when asserting that great leaders "create movements by empowering the tribe [i.e. those with a shared interest] to communicate. They establish the foundation for people to make connections, as opposed to commanding people to follow." The communication to which he refers is between and among the leader and members of a tribe who are connected by a shared interest, a common cause (i.e.
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