Treasure Neverland: Real and Imaginary Pirates and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
£25.00
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Treasure Neverland: Real ... has been added to your Basket
Trade in your item
Get a £5.61
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Treasure Neverland: Real and Imaginary Pirates Hardcover – 12 Sep 2013


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£25.00
£16.24 £17.64
£25.00 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • When you trade in £15 or more you’ll receive an additional £5 Amazon.co.uk Gift Card for the next time you spend £10 or more.


Trade In this Item for up to £5.61
Trade in Treasure Neverland: Real and Imaginary Pirates for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £5.61, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Hardcover: 376 pages
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford (12 Sept. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199679339
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199679331
  • Product Dimensions: 21.8 x 1.8 x 14.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 834,070 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

Treasure Neverland is a valuable study of the many shifts in the pirate-story genre. (Grace Moore, Times Literary Supplement)

Neil Rennie's Treasure Neverland examines priates both real and imagined. beginning with a valuable historical overview that seeks to distinguish the reality of life on the high seas ... Treasure Neverland is a valuable study of the many shifts in the pirate-story genre. (Grace Moore, The The Times Literary Supplement,)

scholarly and entertaining... Rennie not only manages to explain where the pirates of popular imagination come from, but also gives a fascinating example of how historical realities can be transformed into the conventions of fiction. (Colin Burrow, The Guardian)

About the Author

Neil Rennie spent his childhood in exotic islands and strict boarding schools and has written studies and histories of travel as well as of literature and ideas. He teaches at University College London.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
1
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By Agedone on 19 Jun. 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a very useful addition to literature on pirates since it tackles the less well known literary links to piracy, especially from the USA. Highly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 5 people found the following review helpful By enthusiast on 5 Dec. 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I quote from the first para:
'Piracy has been called by many names, but - by any name - it is basically and simply robbery at sea. Although, as such, it is probably as old as seafaring, its so-called 'golden age', the period of its flourishing - distantly, invisibly, at sea in ships, and also legibly, saleably, on land in print - is the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries.'

If this is the prose style for you, you may enjoy the book; but I'm afraid I became dragged down by its laboured pomposity. Swashbuckling it certainly isn't. And phrases like: 'we should attempt to observe him in the clearest transparency possible' really don't lift the spirits. It needed an editorial axe - OUP didn't wield it - or was it even worse originally?

A shame because there is something here of value but I can't commend it as a good read. Having struggled through to the end, I'm afraid I have to go down to one star. This really is a dog of a book despite getting a decent review in the Guardian.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback