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Transforming Preaching: The sermon as a channel for God's world
 
 

Transforming Preaching: The sermon as a channel for God's world [Kindle Edition]

David Heywood
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

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Product Description

Review

''Transforming Preaching is a beautifully clear, wise and practical book, which will guide those who are learning to preach and refresh those who have been preaching for many years. In a time when preaching's educational value is sometimes dismissed, I especially welcome the author's reclamation of preaching as an event through which genuine learning can and should take place. I recommend it without hesitation to all who want their preaching to serve the process of human transformation.'' --Stephen I. Wright, Tutor in Biblical Studies and Practical Theology, Spurgeon's College, London

''Drawing on his considerable expertise in the field of adult learning, David Heywood develops a view of preaching as an agent of change. He is not interested in sermons that keep congregations occupied for fifteen minutes but make no lasting difference to the reality of their discipleship or the quality of their community life. This is a thoughtful and well-argued book that shows, with a wealth of practical examples, how preaching can play a major part in the transformation of the church.'' --David Day, Tutor, The College of Preachers, Nottingham

''Accessible, practical, challenging and profound, Transforming Preaching is a 'must' for anyone who preaches, who wants to preach, and who wants to preach in fresh and creative ways . . . The sermon is an event and David Heywood makes that event life-giving and life-changing in this new and exciting book.'' --The Revd Dr Helen-Ann Hartley, Dean for the New Zealand Dioceses at the College of St John the Evangelist, Auckland, Aotearoa New Zealand

Product Description

Rooted in a clear understanding of the indispensable authority of God’s word, Transforming Preaching provides a wealth of practical wisdom and advice for anyone approaching the task of preaching for the first time. It also serves as a useful refresher for all who want to increase the effectiveness of their preaching ministry. Basing his advice on the latest research into the way people listen, learn and grow in the Christian life, David Heywood looks at ways of constructing and delivering successful sermons, while also providing a stimulating guide to the principles and benefits of interactive preaching.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 603 KB
  • Print Length: 160 pages
  • Publisher: SPCK (16 May 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00CKDEAO2
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #254,060 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Know and love the congregation 17 Feb 2014
Format:Paperback
The author draws on his former teaching experience to show what motivates people to listen and to engage, advises us about preparing and structuring sermons, writing for the ear rather than reading an essay and interactive preaching. A survey from Durham in 2009 showed that 96% of churchgoers look forward to the sermon. David Heywood is well read and has experience from a variety of types of church. Like many of us, he knows instinctively that he is on the right track when a passage lights up and resolves itself and when we doubt whether we have got the message right, someone will tell us that it spoke to their situation. He advises us to be ourselves but to be our best selves. He is concerned to bridge the gap between the university and the pew but I disagree with him when he asks whether a congregation really need to know that the gospels misrepresent the pharisees. With its 26 reflective exercises, there is scope for a good DIY refresher course for preachers as there is always more to learn.

You cannot expect to preach effectively if you don't know your con¬gregation. And you will not get to know them unless you love them. Nor will the congregation give you authority as a preacher and be open to listen to what you say unless you love them. In the words of John Maxwell, 'People don't care how much you know until they know how much you care'. Moreover, without love you will not be able to get the message for your sermons week by week. Only if you love your congregation will you be able to hear from God what he wants to say to them. Only if you love them will you have the authority to say the hard things that may be necessary from time to time.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Well worth reading 3 Jan 2014
Format:Paperback
Even if we don't preach very often, we've all heard sermons. This makes it very easy to read and absorb Heywood's first two chapters, which together address very effectively the big question of why we preach in the first place. I whole heartedly agree with his conclusion that preaching should be a participative event within the `balanced' diet of church life, and should lead to action.

His book loses this initial momentum in the third chapter on how to preach. The advice is good, notably the `two horizons' of interpretation, but it is concentrated. It probably needs to be worked through using either the suggested exercises or in some real sermon preparation.

Heywood apologises in advance for the `schizophrenic' (sic) discontinuity between the last chapter on interaction and the preceding chapters. And it certainly does seem to contradict most of what has gone before. However, this may be because I couldn't work out exactly what Heywood is advocating. Is it interaction to encourage participation or the sermon as a facilitated discussion? If the latter, I have a problem. Maybe it wouldn't happen in one of Heywood's churches, but, it is (just) possible that the self-righteous and over-confident would seize the opportunity to promote their obvious and superficial `insights'.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars  1 review
5.0 out of 5 stars Know and love the congregation 17 Feb 2014
By Mr. D. P. Jay - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
The author draws on his former teaching experience to show what motivates people to listen and to engage, advises us about preparing and structuring sermons, writing for the ear rather than reading an essay and interactive preaching. A survey from Durham in 2009 showed that 96% of churchgoers look forward to the sermon. David Heywood is well read and has experience from a variety of types of church. Like many of us, he knows instinctively that he is on the right track when a passage lights up and resolves itself and when we doubt whether we have got the message right, someone will tell us that it spoke to their situation. He advises us to be ourselves but to be our best selves. He is concerned to bridge the gap between the university and the pew but I disagree with him when he asks whether a congregation really need to know that the gospels misrepresent the pharisees. With its 26 reflective exercises, there is scope for a good DIY refresher course for preachers as there is always more to learn.

You cannot expect to preach effectively if you don't know your con¬gregation. And you will not get to know them unless you love them. Nor will the congregation give you authority as a preacher and be open to listen to what you say unless you love them. In the words of John Maxwell, 'People don't care how much you know until they know how much you care'. Moreover, without love you will not be able to get the message for your sermons week by week. Only if you love your congregation will you be able to hear from God what he wants to say to them. Only if you love them will you have the authority to say the hard things that may be necessary from time to time.

This also means letting people get to know you, for which you need to meet them in their homes, chat about their daily lives, know the problems that face them in work and family life. Some pastors, whose full-time work is Christian ministry, occasionally spend a morning or even a whole day at work with members of their congregation, getting to know them in the setting where they spend so much of their lives, gaining insights into the problems they face day by day. Without mentioning particular people and situations, except with their permission, all this information will help you when seeking to apply the message of the Bible to situations in people's everyday lives. Any preaching ministry is built on a foundation of pastoral care and concern in which you learn to love the people who listen to your sermons week by week and they learn to respect and trust you.

No congregation is homogeneous so generalizations may easily catch you out. But you will need to know about your congregation's general level of understanding of the Bible so as to judge for any given passage how much background information they need in order to understand it. You will need to know about the makeup of the congregation: do they come from similar or diverse backgrounds? Do they have similar or varying levels of education? Are they of much the same income group or are there wide divergences? You will need to know the 'style' of faith prevalent in the church. Do people tend to believe a person in authority such as you; or do they expect to believe only when they have the chance to think something out for themselves?
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