Tower and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £20.00
  • You Save: £1.05 (5%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Tower: An Epic History of... has been added to your Basket
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Minor scuffing to the edges of the DJ - boards excellent - small mark on outer edge of pages otherwise unmarked
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Tower: An Epic History of the Tower of London Hardcover – 13 Oct 2011


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£18.95
£10.42 £2.17
£18.95 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Tower: An Epic History of the Tower of London + The Tower of London: The Official Illustrated History: The Official Illustrated Guide (Official Illusrtated History)
Price For Both: £31.00

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Hardcover: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Hutchinson; 1st Edition edition (13 Oct. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0091936659
  • ISBN-13: 978-0091936655
  • Product Dimensions: 16.2 x 4 x 24 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 271,443 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

"In writing about the Tower's glory days, Nigel Jones has produced a wonderfully rollicking history of England itself. Told with relish, it should be a godsend to any history teacher who needs to hold the attention of his pupils" (Daily Mail)

"A breezy account of the Tower's past is full of surprises . . . Nigel Jones knows how to tell a tale with just enough detail to make the story work in any period since the 11th century . . . thrilling history" (Sunday Telegraph)

"Much as I love books on Britain's past, it is a long time since I found one which enthralled me as much as the 400 pages of this volume. Jones tells the colourful story in an equally lively fashion, and the two sections of black and white plates, from the Bayeux Tapestry to the Krays, are well chosen. An epic history - and an epic read indeed" (Bookbag)

"In the hands of Nigel Jones we have an excellent contemporary guide, providing the right mix of scholarship and storytelling, insight and narrative pace, to offer a cracking history of the Tower." (Sunday Express)

"Jones weaves yarns from the Tower's past into the familiar tapestry of English history. His prose is dashing" (Times Literary Supplement)

Book Description

A compelling narrative history of the Tower of London from William the Conqueror to the present day

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Related Media

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Kate Barber on 11 Oct. 2011
Format: Hardcover
In a sense the author has written Our Island Story through the prism of the Tower of London. Constructed shortly after the Battle of Hastings the Tower has been, throughout its lifetime, a fortress, menagerie, Royal Mint, an observatory and tourist attraction. There are a number of set pieces, such as the Peasant's Revolt and killing of the Princes in the Tower, that the author writes about with economy and flair. Similarly there are colourful and engaging cameos in the Tower's history, from the likes of Sir Isaac Newton and the Duke of Wellington.
Nigel Jones' excellent book sheds light upon both the majesty and bloody deeds of the Tower itself - and British History.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By KAW on 5 Nov. 2012
Format: Hardcover
This is an entertaining romp through some of the more colourful episodes in the Tower's history. As other reviewers have said it relies heavily on secondary sources and can be very one sided. This is especially evident in the section on the Overbury case where Frances Howard is portrayed as a monster, a very different point of view is possible and was broadcast recently on BBC's Who do you think you are? in which actress Celia Imrie found out that Frances Howard was a distant relative and another side of the story of this very young woman was told.
Sometimes the author assumes that the reader knows facts that haven't yet been mentioned in the book, for example p53 "For all his devotion to his wife Elanor, Edward 1 was a vicious and relentless enemy." He has not told us about Edward's marriage or the crosses he had built to mark his wife's death, so for some readers this remark would make no sense. There are also small mistakes for instance Anne of Bohemia's funeral took place at Westminister nor Windsor as stated; Hainalt is at one point located in France and later the modern Netherlands.
So this is ok as an amuzing and rather biased look at the Tower's past, but if you are looking for facts, check them out from other sources.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
25 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Michael Parsons (Cardiff, UK) on 10 April 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is an irritating book, in that it should be much better than it is. Nigel Jones is a good writer who has assembled many interesting facts, and who can create deft pen-portraits of many individuals. I think he relies too much on Tudor accounts of the Richard III affair - (would he regard Arthur Scargill as an impeccable and unbiased source on Margaret Thatcher, I wonder?) - and some of the conclusions he draws may be wrong (Pepys may not have been currying favour by escorting his superior's wife to the Tower - they were after all cousins) but are at least arguable.

Unfortunately there are far too many errors in this book as currently presented; for example, Victoria ascended the throne in 1837, not 1838, the date at one point switches from 1674 to 1664, 1513 should obviously be 1613 (in the Overbury section) and the King in 1436 was Henry VI, not Henry V. Perhaps worst of all, the book shows a complete lack of understanding of the peerage. Duke and Earl are not synonymous, neither are Duchess and Countess. Characters change their name and rank frequently; for example, Henry Grey, Duke of Suffolk, suddenly becomes Earl of Suffolk, his daughter Catherine becomes Katherine before reverting to Catherine, and Margaret Plantagenet Pole, niece of Edward IV and Richard III, is twice called Duchess of Salisbury and twice called by her real title, Countess of Salisbury.

These errors cannot but detract from this book; if you know some things you're being told are wrong, how can you believe others? I'd urge Nigel Jones to correct this book before the paperback edition and make it as good as it deserves to be.
6 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
24 of 26 people found the following review helpful By F Carson on 18 Oct. 2011
Format: Hardcover
Whether telling the grand narrative of the Wars of the Roses, or recounting short episodes such as the Kray's imprisonment - and escape - from the Tower, this book is always enthralling. The author has a sense of judgement and humour - and readers young and old should mine something interesting and entertaining from its pages. Similar to Simon Sebag Montefiore having used Jerusalem to tell the story of the Middle East, Nigel Jones has used the Tower as a window upon the past two thousand years of British History.
There is much in this book that I found new - and I am an avid reader of history books - but at the same time the Tower is accessible and as good a place as any to learn about the period and saga of the monarchy which runs through it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By J. Stevens on 6 July 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I agree with most reviewers that this book is a splendid read and almost impossible to put down at times but following on from Michael Parsons' review in April it is sad to report that the paperback edition still contains far too many silly and obvious factual errors which should have been corrected. Just one example: on page 250 we are advised that Lady Jane Grey (the "Nine Day Queen") was the gt.granddaughter of Elizabeth 1st's father Henry VIII. She was actually the gt.granddaughter of Elizabeth's grandfather Henry VII. I could go on.....and on....and on. For me though the most annoying aspect of this book is the complete lack of any any page notes in the text because there isn't a notes and references section at the back of the book - just a brief bibliography. There were literally hundreds of occasions when reading the book when I wondered as to the source of an anecdote or a reference to a historic document or letter leaving me to muse as to accuracy or author's licence.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback