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Tourist Season Paperback – 7 May 1999


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Paperback, 7 May 1999
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Product details

  • Paperback: 480 pages
  • Publisher: Pan; New edition edition (7 May 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0330322362
  • ISBN-13: 978-0330322362
  • Product Dimensions: 11.1 x 2.9 x 17.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 242,272 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Carl Hiaasen was born and raised in Florida. He is the author of twelve novels, including the bestselling Nature Girl, Skinny Dip, Sick Puppy and Lucky You, and three bestselling children's books, Hoot, Flush and Scat. They have been translated into 34 languages, 33 more than he can read or write. Carl Hiaasen also writes an award-winning column for The Miami Herald.

Product Description

About the Author

Carl Hiaasen has been writing about Florida since he was given a typewriter at the age of six. His novel, BASKET CASE, was a Sunday Times hardcover bestseller for over a month on publication in March 2002. As well as fiction, Hiaasen writes columns for the Miami Herald.

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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By G. Mott on 13 Oct 2005
Format: Paperback
Not my first of his books but his first and in my view the best. Very funny, with some great characters and some good plot twists.
His "lets save Florida" is still relevant while the heroes and villians are more ambigious than is commonly seen.
Great ending too.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By norm@ccnet.com on 31 Jan 2001
Format: Paperback
If you are riding a plane coast to coast or out to Maui or the Virgin Islands then take along a copy of Carl Hiasen's "Tourist Season". You will enjoy the cast of characters come tumbling straight out of a Florida hurricane's whirlwind. The plot twists and turns like a current thru the Everglades. And watch out if you think you know what is going to happen next, because you really don't!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By C. Green TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 23 July 2010
Format: Paperback
As another reviewer mentions, Tourist Season was Carl Hiaasen's first novel, published back in 1986. As such it sets the template for most of his subsequent works. There's the cast of off-beat characters, the twisting, convoluted plotting and the focus on the damage being done to Florida's environment by rapacious unchecked development.

As with many debut novels however, all these ingredients aren't distilled down into the deceptively smooth product that later Hiaasen novels would become. For example there are plenty of odd-ball characters on display but they don't all work that well. One of the strengths of some of Hiaasen's later novels is that even the bad guys, means, crazy and/or stupid as they often are, will be entertaining company. In Tourist Season I struggled to warm to Skip Wiley or any of his henchmen. Brian Keyes, the book's nominal hero, also failed to jump of the page for me and remained an insubstantial figure.

The plot too lacked the finesse of Hiassen's best work, remaining jumpy and episodic throughout. As a black farce it just about worked but there wasn't tight, screwball pacing and plotting of books such as Basket Case or Skinny Dip. The tone of the novel also felt inconsistent. Wiley and his cohort are painted as a genuinely unpleasant and murderous group, responsible for the nasty deaths of several entirely innocent people, yet at times the book seemed almost sympathetic to them and their cause.

Finally and most damagingly I found that what really let Tourist Season down was the scarcity of genuine laughs to be had whilst reading it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By R. Shear VINE VOICE on 30 July 2009
Format: Paperback
One of the hardest novels to write is a good comedy crime thriller. The balance between the serious nature of crime and the comedy element is hard to achieve. Many have tried and very few have succeeded.

Tourist Season is one such success. The story centres on the actions of a terrorist group called "las Noches de Diciembre" and their plan to rid Florida of it's plague of tourists. However, the four terrorists each have their own agenda, and are only held together by their charismatic leader, El Fuego.

Opposing them are a private eye, a Cuban policeman and a newspaper editor, who not only have to stop Las Noches, but also face opposition from the Miami chamber of commerce who dread any hint of Bad Publicity.

The fact that the cause of Las Noches de Diciembre is a just one, makes it hard to dislike them, and also asks the reader whether it is acceptable to do bad deeds for a good cause.

Tourist Season has some great characters, some very funny moments and is a joy to read. The pages just fly by. There are not the plot twists and Whodunnit? elements of a standard crime novel, but the black comedy more than makes up for it.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By "b_m_whitley" on 2 Sep 2002
Format: Paperback
Tourist season is Carl Hiassen's first novel, the point he makes in this book and in all his books is very very simple: Florida Stinks. This may lead you to believe that these books are nothing but 700 page rants against the tourists who flock to florida, the developers who are destroying the natural beauty of the everglades and the politicians who do nothing to stop the raping of the land. He is getting at these people, but he does it well. His books aren't political essays, they're not anti-tourist brochures, they're novels. He uses fiction to show with exocet-like proficiency how corrupt and filthy Florida is. He does this in all his books, but all his books are different. He has some recurring characters; Al Garcia, Skink, Jim Tile. But the books don't need to be read in sequence. Tourist season is, as you might guess, about tourists. In fact it is a book showing how the developers and government officials pander to the tourists whim, building high-rises in Nature preserves to let them enjoy nature. All his books turn the spotlight on one area of Florida's problems, but in all of them he show's how the state is being concreted to hell. All in all, this is a briliant first novel, and they just keep getting better.
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