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Total War Rome: Destroy Carthage Hardcover – 3 Sep 2013


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Macmillan (3 Sep 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0230770940
  • ISBN-13: 978-0230770942
  • Product Dimensions: 15.3 x 3.6 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 234,091 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

David Gibbins is the author of ten novels that have sold over three million copies, and he has been published in thirty languages. He has been on both the New York Times and the London Sunday Times top-ten bestseller lists, and his international success includes having being Newsweek number one bestseller in Poland. He has written eight novels in his Jack Howard series of archaeological adventures as well as two novels in his Total War series set in the ancient world. He has a PhD in archaeology from Cambridge University, is a passionate diver and derives much of the inspiration for his novels from the many expeditions he has led around the world to investigate ancient sites, both on land and underwater. His awards have included a Fellowship and medallion from the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust. You can find out more about his discoveries and his novels at www.davidgibbins.com and on his Facebook page.

Product Description

Review

'The long memory of an unfinished war drives this historical novel from archaeologist Gibbins . . . [he] delivers the last battle in superb scenes of the horrid surprises of war, and although he rewrites an alternative death for Hasdrubal, the general defending Carthage, his work rings true. "Carthage must be destroyed" is the endgame of this novel, but the road to that Roman victory is the true reading enjoyment'

Kirkus Reviews

About the Author

David Gibbins is the author of seven previous historical adventure novels that have sold over two million copies and are published in twenty-nine languages. He taught archaeology, ancient history and art history as a university lecturer, before turning to writing fiction full-time. He is a passionate diver and has led numerous expeditions, some that led to extraordinary discoveries of ten-thousand-year-old artefacts.

David divides his time between England and a farm and wilderness tract in Canada where he does most of his writing.

www.davidgibbins.com


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Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 5 Nov 2013
Format: Paperback
Destroy Carthage details the rise Scipio Africanus and Fabius. The Fabius character is a fictional character, who serves as the second-in-command to Scipio. It's from his viewpoint that we get to see the `real story' of Scipio's rise to power in Rome after leading his army through Carthage. Destroy Carthage - combines fictional and non-fictional elements to blend into an interesting narrative.

What the reader gets are the experiences and the severity of war, from the violent battles to the outcome of cold, dead corpses lying in your path. The author writes in a persuasive manner that will make you feel you are standing in Fabius's shoes, as he experiences each new challenge that is thrust at him and his compatriots. You are given a linear history of Fabius and Scipio's military careers, their training, battle strategies and even certain life events that took place before the Roman Empire. You are made to routinely feel connected to these characters and have a sense of who they are. As for gamer, this book is almost like homage to them, as it continuously integrates subtle references to aspects of the Total War game series.

For me the book is trying to add a whole new dimension to the video game by giving players some behind-the-scenes stories of what really went on, in terms of preparation and during the subsequent battles. As for the non-gamer and those interested in historical fiction, this saga still works and caters to them as well.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Parm TOP 500 REVIEWER on 8 Sep 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
I have found this a tough book to review, i have been searching for what i hope is the best comparison to describe it. (not sure I cracked it but here goes)

The book right from page one suffers from and gains from its link to the video game (are they still called that... damn I'm showing my age) I loved the first Rome Total War, but it sucked time like a black hole. It and the Intro to the book gave the book a bit of a Manual feel. Then there is the style of the book, it instructs the reader, it gives a depth of background to Rome at the time that you dont find in many Roman fiction titles, the army, the politics and how they all fit together, all like a lesson plan, or a game world build.

All that may have you screaming...NOOOO don't buy it... But that's because i haven't tempered it with..

David Gibbins is an excellent writer, i think he may have to blend his normal thriller style with the historical fiction writing to really lift the series to the next level. But what he does provide in this book is an insight into a period of Rome that few have covered, and a look at the political machinations of the Roman senate and upper echelons or power, and how the powers that be, may have finally ended up in front of the walls of Carthage. David does start to bring out his ability with characters creation, but i think some of that growth was hindered by the semi instructional style of the book.

I really want to see how this series progresses and grows. Here is a book I enjoyed and that taught me something, its not often I feel as if I have been educated throughout a book and entertained at the same time.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Arkgirl VINE VOICE on 20 Nov 2013
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This book is advertised as being for avid historians and historical gamers, but really it seems to be more aimed at the former group. After the Prologue, where we get a wonderful take on the Battle of Pydna, we do not experience another battle until the fourth part, and then once again we have a gap until the sixth. Therefore we do not learn as much about battles through the characters experiencing them but more through the group looking back on previous battles that have taken place.
The highlight of this book is the close friendship of the two main characters, Fabius (fictional) and Scipio (Non-fictional) as they go through their military career for Macedonia to Spain, and finally to Carthage where they keep on mentioning their destiny lies. They share laughs, and also sadness.
Overall, I think this is a wonderful book and I would encourage anybody interested in history to read it. On the other hand if you buy this expecting a book that will give lots of hints for Rome 2: Total War, I believe you will be sadly mistaken.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Uncle Barbar TOP 100 REVIEWER on 19 Nov 2013
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This is a decent enough Historical novel. My main problem with it was that just twelve pages from the end of the novel proper does he actually get us to the storming of Carthage - so the rest of the book is merely preamble - the Battle of Pydna and the action in Spain were decent enough but rare gems in a lot of wandering around and chatting!

The author seems to know his stuff (for some reason he needs to tell us all about his credentials at the back of the book - doing a phd in History, archaeological digs at Carthage etc) Fair enough him discussing the ancient sources available. What I didn't need was him then telling us about each of the characters and going through the VERY SAME information of historical sources each time.

Also, I am not really sure what the point of the "Total War" tie-in thing is all about - it's just a novel - nothing really to do with the game (I have been playing the Total War games since they first come out and they are excellent).
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