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Tony Palmer - All My Loving [1968] [DVD]


Price: £10.12 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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£10.12 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details Only 1 left in stock. Sold by Fulfillment Express and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Tony Palmer - All My Loving [1968] [DVD] + All You Need Is Love : The Story Of Popular Music - Tony Palmer's Classic Series [5 Discs - NTSC Region 0] [2008] [DVD]
Price For Both: £38.11

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Product details

  • Actors: Patrick Allen, Ginger Baker, Jack Bruce, Eric Burdon, Anthony Burgess
  • Directors: Tony Palmer
  • Producers: John Culshaw
  • Format: Colour, DVD-Video, PAL
  • Language: English
  • Region: All Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: Exempt
  • Studio: Plastic Head
  • DVD Release Date: 10 Sep 2007
  • Run Time: 52 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000SM7R1K
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 57,783 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Documentary profile of the prolific, award-winning film and TV director. In a career spanning over 40 years, Palmer has made over 100 films, ranging from early works with The Beatles, Cream, Jimi Hendrix and Frank Zappa, through to his portraits of classical greats Maria Callas, Igor Stravinsky, Richard Wagner, Yehudi Menuhin, Benjamin Britten and Ralph Vaughan Williams.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

44 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Og Oggilby VINE VOICE on 20 July 2007
Format: DVD
All My Loving was an extremely controversial documentary when first broadcast in 1968 - it was even shown after the 'Epilogue', when the BBC used to shut down for the night - and it still carries a real punch nearly four decades later. Fast-moving, incisively edited, it mixes interviews with many of the real rock luminaries of the time - Hendrix, Frank Zappa, Pete Townshend, Eric Burdon, Paul McCartney, and even George Harrison's mum - with contemporary newsreel footage from Viet Nam, the Paris Student Riots and other then-current events to make for a vivid, kaleidoscopic snapshot of where Rock was at back then. Rock was separating from Pop, and it is both amusing and refreshing to see how seriously music was taken back then, instead of it being just another lifestyle accessory as it is today. Some bits haven't worn that well, and Patrick Allen's voice-links are tremendously po-faced - but it has verve and energy, and the live footage is great. Highly recommended to anyone with any interest in Rock's Golden Age.
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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful By James B. Spink HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 9 Mar 2008
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I remember watching this programme when it was first broadcast forty years ago. It had a tremendous impact at the time and, although I hadn't seen it again until I bought this DVD, I remembered it well. There are some very powerful images here which are as relevant today as they were then.

Although shot in 1967 the BBC waited until 1968 before transmitting the film. The reason for this and how the film came to be made in the first place are explained in a bonus feature on the DVD. There is a lengthy interview with Tony Palmer recorded in January 2007 in which he explains the politics behind the film and those at the BBC at that time. He also discusses some of his other projects which, fortunately, a search for him in DVD on Amazon reveals many are now available once more!

All My Loving has been digitally restored for this release and is presented in widescreen 16:9 NTSC. The soundtrack is very clear and dynamic, particularly in view of it's age. There is also a small gallery of Gerald Scarfe's cartoons as an additional bonus feature.

A minor sixties classic that will stand repeated viewing today.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Alan Burridge on 10 Sep 2008
Format: DVD
Indeed, as my fellow reviewer's agree, an incredible snapshot of how we were in 1968, and hat's off, still, to Tony Palmer for capturing the images which are wonderful for any young person studying our musical heritage, and indeed, for us to look back upon.
Although Patrick Allen (RIP) was THE 'in' voice-over man of the time, both this and Cream's 'Farewell Concert' have unfortunately been marred by his observations. Fair play, he may well have just been reading someone else's words from a script, but even when 'All My Loving' was originally broadcast, Allen's commentary gives the impression, but only during Cream's fiesty live clip from 'We're Going Wrong' that WE AS A GENERATION were going / had gone wrong. This was most objectionable at the time, and as a survivor from the era I still find it so today. But I am now old enough and most certainly ugly enough to be able to cope with this faux-pas, where Jack Bruce's song title and lyric, written after a falling out with his wife, was completely misconstrued, and thus gave the impression my /our generation were complete idiots for being Hippies.
However, the doc is well worth seeing for the Sixties music student, as it is charged with the fraught, tenseness associated with both the Vietnam War and the radical changes taking place as our music was abruptly evolving from pop to rock with a fiery attitude.
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Format: DVD
I originally watched this in 1968 and being a twenty year old, I was impressed.
I watched it tonight, August 2014 and was stunned by the pretentiousness exhibited by Palmer. He is absolutely clueless about modern music, going so far as to arbitrarily cut off Cream's masterpiece "We're Going Wrong' right at the point of its biggest impact. Prick. He's no music lover. That was just one example. More fundamentally, he can't seem to decide whether "Pop" ( aka rock, blues, Beatles, Stones etc) is as good as, or better than classical music, or whether it's just rubbish. I suspect he doesn't know.
Apart from the farrago of rubbish about rock music, did we really have to be treated to regular clips of concentration camps, burning monks and public executions? What did these really have to do with music being enjoyed by young people?
The only bright spark of the whole mess was the sight of Larry Parnes proving himself to be just as big a schmuck as Palmer.
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By Jester70 on 5 April 2009
Format: DVD
The dvd features interviews with the main players of the day, eg Paul McCartney, Frank Zappa, Eric Burden etc along with clips of shocking footage from Vietnam & The Holocaust. I suppose these clips were included to get across the message that no matter how important Rock music was, there were other events through history that had far more importance. Patrick Allen's narration can be tiresome though. For example, half a minute into a Paul McCartney interview, Allen would chip in "Paul McCartney", presumably for those viewers who had spent the last 5 years on Mars. All in all, a great programme.
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