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4.7 out of 5 stars
Tintin: Explorers on the Moon
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
This, actually the second part of a double-bill, was the first Tintin adventure I ever owned. I can still recall how my original copy eventually disintegrated, from frequent use. As my first experience of Tintin I still have a special fondness for it even now, all these many years later. Having left Tintin and his fellow crew-members blacked-out aboard the moon rocket, Explorers On The Moon picks up where the final cliff-hanging page of Destination Moon left off. Without giving anything away, suffice it to say that Hergé's lunar exploration adventure doesn't disappoint.

With the hindsight we now have, parts appear by turn cutely fantastical or strikingly 'prophetic'. Even taking into account things Hergé got wrong, it's impressive, given that Hergé was dreaming this all up on terra firma over a decade prior to the actual moon-landings. For some these discrepancies detract from the success of these lunar adventures. Not so for me: I've always loved them, and as works of children's fictional adventure I think they succeed very admirably. Indeed, one could argue that they're commendably bold in tackling what was, at the time they were published, still in the realm of science fiction.

As usual there's action, adventure, excitement, and comedy. As well as the expected buffoonery of Capt. Haddock and Thompson and Thomson there's also villainy, heroism and tragedy, making some aspects of this particular episode figure amongst the darker moments within the Tintin stories. But never fear, it's all served up with that endearing boy scout old-school adventurousness that is a part of what makes these stories both full of period charm, and enduring classics. Wonderful!
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
"Explorers on the Moon" ("On a Marche Sur La Lune," 1954) picks up right where "Destination Moon" left off, with Tintin and his friends unconscious in a spaceship hurtling towards the general direction of the moon. Will our hero wake up in time to save everyone from death? Well, I do not think it is giving away too much to point out that the title of this Tintin Adventure is not something along the lines of "Frozen Corpses in Deep Space." However, there is clearly a spy on board the rocket designed by Professor Calculus that took off from the Sprodj Atomic Research Center in Syldavaia, the troubles of Tintin and his friends are far from over.
But more than the standard intrigue and constant brushes with danger that abound in this Tintin adventure, what makes "Explorers on the Moon" so fascinating is the documentary detail that Hergé infuses into the story. I cannot think of a 1950s science fiction film that predicts as accurately what happened when Apollo 11 went to the moon a decade and a half later as this classic comic book tale. One of the chief charms of Hergé's artwork has always been the way his caricature drawings of Tintin and friends are contrasted by the realistic backgrounds, and this artistic style achieves its apex when we see the spaceship approaching the moon. "Explorers on the Moon" would work as a straight-forward first man on the moon type story, but, of course, in Hergé's hands it becomes so much more.
Taken together with "Destination Moon," this has got to constitute Tintin's greatest adventure. After all, what can top being the first man on the moon for our intrepid hero? Especially when the Thom(p)sons are along for the trip. The entire series is pretty good, and I only regret that I waited this long in life to finally get around to checking it out.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 1 July 2014
This science fictional comic , written in 1954 , 14 years before the first actual moon landing , fails to disappoint , after the precedent set by its prequel , 'Destination Moon'.
This adventure sees Tintin and friends successfully go to the moon and back , defeating such problems as a rapidly depleting oxygen source and villains who have followed them into space .
I read it when I was ten and it led me to become interested in space.
I remember sitting on top of the roof of my home , reading it , and seeing a shooting star fly by. There is something intriguing about these comics.
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TOP 500 REVIEWERon 25 October 2010
The slow build-up of Destination Moon, slightly overburdened with technological background details taking precedence over the spy thriller elements, proves to be justified by the sheer brilliance, imagination, thrills and entertainment provided in the second part of the story which takes Tintin and his friends into genuinely new territory. Explorers on the Moon, in many ways, is Hergé at his very best.

Consequently, having established the scientific principles of space flight in the opening book, there's little time wasted here in getting the rocket ship to the Moon. The story still has time before then however to explore some of the strange phenomenon of space flight, and it has considerable fun with weightlessness and extravehicular activity, mostly at the expense of Captain Haddock and his attempts to imbibe some contraband whiskey. There is considerable licence taken here, as there is with the eventual exploration of conditions on the moon, but it has to be remembered that this published fifteen years before man first landed on the moon, and much of the procedures and findings here are often nonetheless very close to the reality.

What enlivens Explorers on the Moon however is the wonderful dynamic played out between Tintin, Snowy, Haddock, Calculus and the Thomsons - all of them settling into well-defined roles that have been established after several adventures - and how they interact with the spy thriller element that unfolds after several tense and dangerous lunar explorations. There's certainly a debt owed to Fritz Lang's pulpy 'Woman on the Moon' in this respect, but that doesn't prevent the novelty of the setting and the inherent wonder and danger of being marooned far from home to be fully exploited.

Best of all, Hergé's artwork here is quite literally out of this world. The rendering of earth landscapes in Hergé's ligne-claire style is always magnificent, whether it is working with jungles, deserts, seascapes, or rocky Andean and snow-covered Himalayan mountain ranges, but it proves to be perfect for establishing the lifeless majesty of lunar landscapes, craters and caverns. Some of the scenes, with the red rocket set against the stars with planet Earth in the background, are still simply beautiful timeless images. Hergé captures the wonder and mystery of the moon, and even if it has since been walked upon in real life, its mystery remains and still fires the imagination, and that's exactly what Explorers on the Moon captures.
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on 3 June 2015
This is part 2 of Tintin's lunar adventure. Both books were my favourite Tintin books when I was a child and it is nice to have them both again. I will not go over the plot as others have done this but surface to say all the great characters are here Tintin, captain Haddock, Prof Calculus and also of course the usual assortment of swarthy foreign villans - would it be published today one wonders? Also appearing are the inept Thompson twins. All great fun and bearing in mind how long ago it was written not bad on the science of "doing the moon".
Get the 2 books read them and revisit your childhood then give them to your children or if older their children!
I may go and get Red Rackham's treasure next! Just a shame they never made an animated movie of these two books.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on 2 September 2001
This book follows directly on from Destination Moon, and is best read after that one. Tintin, Captain Hadock, Professor Calculus and Snowy face a series of unexpected twists as they explore the Moon, and even the return journey is fraught with danger. Excellent fun from the world's favourite journalist.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 1 March 2008
Maybe 4 1/2 stars, but what the heck. The theme of the book does not intrigue me so much nor do I think this is great "science fiction". It is, however, very funny and - along with The Castafiore Emerald - contains probably the best dialogue of any Tintin book.

A special mention should go to Captain Haddock who is easily the funniest and the most complex Tintin character. Here he, of course, gets drunk a couple of times and speaks his mind on many occasions. The (verbal) belting he gives to poor Thompson twins (for their stupidity) is worth a purchase alone!

So for me, this is just great fun, nothing more, nothing less.
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on 14 March 2013
My son's favourite as he is mad on space. I love it as I reflect on the images of the rockets and space of the time and how far things have really progressed! But the story is just as enjoyable, TinTin remains cool!
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 15 July 2009
A dog in space on something as far removed from the Shuttle as you can get! Every Tintin book is a work of genuis (all right the TV spin off books are a bit pants)but all of the originals are the ideal Big brother/ Dad reading a bed time story. My father did them all with me and i am doing them with my son.

The sheer joy they bring to bedtime for me and my son is imeasurable. He's already reading them alone (sort of) and I love the fact that he will read them to his son..
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on 18 November 2013
Had this book when I was a kid and always wanted it again - put off by the price until now - brought back happy memories and still beautifully illustrated
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