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Is Tino Georgiou the same person as Giorgio Kostantinos?


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Initial post: 25 Feb 2008 10:55:04 GMT
Last edited by the author on 25 Feb 2008 22:50:24 GMT
Meeghan Cloister's review of "A Thousand Splendid Suns" employs the well-used "I'd recommend The Fates by Tino Georgiou". Curiously, a review by 'another' Meeghan Cloister, this time on the Amazon Japan site, of "The Devil and Miss Prym" by Paulo Coelho uses a similar line, but about a different book: " I also recommend reading Giorgio Kostantinos' bestseller-The Quest-highly enjoyable." Sound familiar? Should do as the pattern behind the publicity for The Quest is the same as that behind The Fates. Meeghan's review for the Quest is plagiarised from Andrew Biggs' review on Amazon.com with the added tag line. Googling Konstantino's book reveals many 5-star reviews, interspersed with 1-star reviews by disappointed readers. The Quest was also self-published and clearly self-publicised. Take a look at the review of the Chronicles of Narnia by "john2341" - (or his other review). Maybe Tino should give up writing novels and become a real-estate agent instead.

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Feb 2008 13:09:43 GMT
There was a big discussion about this elsewhere, and if your googling skills were any good you'd know that Tino Georgiou's real name is Brandon Devereux. If you read either book, you'd know that neither the pictures on the back nor the writing styles are similar. Clearly they are two different people, but maybe a few people think they are the same and that would explain all the fake 1-star reviews on this book. As someone who read both books, I can honestly say the only thing similar is the names. Maybe Brandon thought using a sydu would help his sales. If you are going by reviewers that use the line "I also recommend reading" then you'll match up a whole host of reviewers. I am amazed by the number of non-readers who vest an interest in this book. Which is also clear proof of the 1-star reviews being fake.

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Feb 2008 13:13:45 GMT
Last edited by the author on 25 Feb 2008 13:17:22 GMT
Here is what some real reviewers have to say about this book:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/cdp/member-reviews/AQZJBVSPWR2LF/ref=cm_pdp_reviews_see_all?ie=UTF8&sort%5Fby=MostRecentReview

http://www.amazon.com/gp/cdp/member-reviews/A2SRZQU1SZG4RR?ie=UTF8&display=public&sort%5Fby=MostRecentReview&page=3

As well as the man himself:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/pdp/profile/A39CJ16B4QW1K5/ref=cm_pdp_profile_pytai

Who also happens to be friends with the bestselling author and Oprah regular Dr. Mike Roizen and a few members of official Amazon teams. So whatever you are trying to imply, your claims are fruitless.

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Feb 2008 13:34:29 GMT
miss pix says:
You are right Randy Wone. AmazonJP and AmazonUK aren't even linked. Meaning if you open an account on AmazonUK you also open an account on the other Amazon's, but not AmazonJP. You must completely re-register with Japan. So, where Mark (not Twain) question can be valid it is completely inappropriate to compare the two.

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Feb 2008 14:27:23 GMT
Last edited by the author on 25 Feb 2008 22:54:51 GMT
So, just a co-incidence that so many of the glowing 5 star reviews are by the same (fake) reviewers? I have read the book cover to cover - I reviewed it and gave it two stars (my review was deleted for no good reason). In my opinion, many of the 5-star reviews are the fakes, the 1-star by people genuinely disappointed. Why else would they write them? There is no gain to denigrating Mr Georgiou (or Deveraux, or Konstantinos, or whatever). The only gain in fake reviews is writing 5-star ones. Google is indeed a useful tool. Your argument about vested interest works against you. Search for "Giorgio Kostantinos" "Tino Georgiou" together and you'll get over 900 hits - almost all of them "Also recommend" comments in the same reviews!

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Feb 2008 14:31:35 GMT
Miss pix, do you think it is a total coincidence that there are two "Meeghan Cloister's" - one posting cross-reviews in Japan and the other doing exactly the same thing in the UK?

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Feb 2008 14:31:38 GMT
Last edited by the author on 25 Feb 2008 14:34:28 GMT
B. H. says:
Yes, I'm sure Amazon's #1 reviewer, Amazon's #7 reviewer, A top 300 reviewer, and a top 1000 reviewer had all written fake 5-star reviews. They all have a lengthy history with Amazon, and all the 1-star reviewers have none. So, I'll believe the 5-star reviews especially since I read this book and agree with them. I'll also believe in Brandon's (Tino's) writing ability. Hacks don't become friends with bestselling Oprah authors or Amazon themselves.

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Feb 2008 14:39:12 GMT
B. H. says:
Why would someone write a fake 1-star review?

Simple, jealousy. They see how well this book is selling and write a fake 1-star review to discourage any potential buyer.

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Feb 2008 14:43:23 GMT
Interesting link, the one to "the man himself". His "review" of "Gravitational Radiation, Luminous Black Holes and Gamma-Ray Burst Supernovae " is plagarised from the BBC.

Thank you for exposing him.

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Feb 2008 14:49:02 GMT
Last edited by the author on 25 Feb 2008 15:24:57 GMT
I can tell you, my reveiew was not written out of jealousy. Seems an odd thing to suggest. Maybe if the "fake reviewers" were all authors of the same genre, with competing books, then you might have a point.

But they're not

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Feb 2008 14:49:29 GMT
Last edited by the author on 25 Feb 2008 14:50:12 GMT
B. H. says:
Doing a search of the two names and checking out the first link The 5th Horseman Amazon CA, which is curious since the book was never listed on Amazon.ca, but I see: 1 review mentions THE FATES, a different review mentions Giorgio Quest, another review mentions KATZENJAMMER, and another mentions Tourist in the Yucatan. Do a search with "tino georgiou" "Tourist in the Yucatan" you get over 50 matches. Do a search "tino georgiou" "KATZENJAMMER" you get over 100 matches. Do a search with "Tourist in the Yucatan" "KATZENJAMMER" you get over 50 matches. Do a search with "Tourist in the Yucatan" "giorgio kostantinos" you get over 150 matches. Do a search for "KATZENJAMMER" "giorgio kostantinos" and you get another 150 matches. So I guess all these self-published authors are related? The same thing can be done with all 897 links.

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Feb 2008 14:52:50 GMT
Last edited by the author on 25 Feb 2008 15:04:11 GMT
B. H. says:
were all authors of the same genre

Those statements seem bold. Since none of the 1-star reviewers have any history with Amazon. So you really don't know if they are or aren't. And like I said earlier: "I'm sure Amazon's #1 reviewer, Amazon's #7 reviewer, A top 300 reviewer, and a top 1000 reviewer had all written fake 5-star reviews. " and "Hacks don't become friends with bestselling Oprah authors or Amazon themselves. "

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Feb 2008 15:17:01 GMT
Amazon's #1 reviewer is Harriet Klausner. She has not written a review of The Fates.
Amazon's #7 reviewer is Jason Parkes. He has not written a review of The Fates.
Care to cite your top 300 and top 1000 reviewers?

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Feb 2008 18:04:12 GMT
D. Whitfield says:
Grady Harp Amazon's #7 reviewer: The Return of the Great Romance Novel

Reading and reviewing early works by novice writers is at times a daunting task. When the writer is so obviously talented as is author Tino Georgiou, the task is easier. Does the novel engage interest from the first page? Are the characters readily identifiable by the third chapter? Is the time frame of the story visually reconstructed in a credible, well-researched manner? In the case to THE FATES the answer is a resounding 'yes', and yet to ignore problems in the execution of the novel would be a disservice to not only potential readers but to the receptive, learning author. THE FATES is a heady romance set in ancient Greek times. The Greeks, under the leadership of Sir Nicholas Constinos, have taken over Karabey Palace in the realm of Turkey, a palace fraught with resentment from the long wars with Greece and form the fact that the Turks on whose land it stands are resentful of the occupiers. The clash of societies is brought to a head with the introduction of the once upper class Turkish family of the Baals in the form of the beautiful Leah Baal. The struggle between the two obviously love stricken couple of Nicholas and Leah form the wedge which drives the story in an near Shakespearean conflict between class, national pride, and honest love that seeks to change the world view by its own rules. Love, lust, revenge, sacrifice, and fidelity are all issues that rise from the steam of the love affair between the Greek Nicholas and the Turk Leah. This is a very entertaining story, one that will please devotees of historical Romance novels. There are problems that the author should address. In transporting the reader to another time in history and maintaining the atmosphere of that period (obviously well researched, here), it is a major mistake to insert phrases as early as page 2 that read 'He was not handsome in the underweight model way so fashionable among men and women on television today'. That sort of jolt disturbs the historical flow of the story! Also choosing names for the characters that are obviously not from the time of the story is disconcerting, names such as 'Josh', 'Keith', 'Patrick', etc. And do we have any evidence that the courtly designators such as 'Sir' and 'Lady' and 'Dame' were used in this era? Yes, these are minor flaws and should not stop the eager reader from enjoying this romance novel. They are mentioned as thoughts for the novelist to consider in what appears will be a long line of novels of this type. New writers are fresh, malleable, and deserve nurturing: Tino Georgiou obviously has the talent that will take him far. Grady Harp

Erika Borsos Amazon rank 288: Defying All Odds, Love Prevails

Tino Georgiou wrote a fascinating romantic novel set in 14th Century Asia Minor in the village of Karabey, forty miles down river from the important city of Troy. The novel captured this reader's imagination from start to finish. The main characters are well developed and have strong, complex personalities which makes the reader want to continue reading to discover how the story unfolds ...The author weaves into the story an ancient culture and traditions which makes the novel come alive. It keeps the reader glued to every page ... mesmerized ... as two unique individuals, one a handsome Greek warrior and conqueror and the other the beautiful daughter of an Anatolian chief, are thrown together by fate. They are drawn to each other through various circumstances. Despite the fact that one is the conqueror, who enters the town of Karabey to take ownership of property given to him for his successes, and the other is a well educated and highly spirited but rebellious vassal - they eventually unite in love, defying and challenging the Greek laws which forbids their marital union.

The reader is introduced to Nicholas Constinos who enters Karabey with an entourage of soldiers to take possession of the castle and properties given to him by the Greek government for loyal service to his country. He is met with derision and defiance by the locals, especially after the new laws are posted for all to read in the marketplace. The reader learns, Leah Baal is the beautiful daughter of a local chief who, along with his wife, had been taken prisoner during the great war with the Bulgarians. Leah had survived and after this event had been adopted by a local aristocrat. Leah was of marriageable age and was promised in marriage by her parents to Peatro Conrad. She is not attracted to him and delays the marriage ceremony, avoiding him whenever possible. Peatro presses his interests and receives encouragement from her adoptive parents, Langdon and Louise Fogus.

Leah first met Nicholas Constinos while helping cook food for the Greeks in the kitchen of the castle. Without her adoptive parents permission, she entered with some of the local ladies hired to cook for the soldiers. Leah had broken away from the kitchen and curiosity led her to explore the stairways in the castle. The castle had formerly belonged to her family before the Bulgarian war. She unexpectedly bumped into Sir Nicholas Constinos who was one of the most handsome and muscular men she had ever seen. He eyed her up and down, appraising her beauty and other feminine attributes. An involuntary electrical current ran through her body as Leah paused and answered his questions. A series of mixed emotions caused her temporary confusion. Sir Nicholas was also baffled by her sudden appearance and was equally stunned by her beauty ... The author does a superb job of building the plot from this point forward. He develops the storyline with precision so they inevitably meet again. On occasion, they exchange heated words but their obvious physical and emotional attraction for each other prevails inspite of all the odds against them. Both Nicholas and Leah sacrifice a great deal, defying conventional wisdom and even break the law in order to unite in marriage, proving their love for one another. This book is most highly recommended. Erika Borsos [pepper flower]

Ravenova Majere reviewer rank 146: Love is Forever

Leah Baal, bewitching Turkish beauty and tempestuous young woman is attempting to cope with her growing feelings for Lord Nicholas Matiole, Greek ruler of Karaby. Despite her people's abhorrence for the conquering Greeks and her own ill will toward the captors of her people, she discovers herself attracted to the dark and brooding Lord of Karaby who despite the sentiments of the subjugated Turkish populace does not appear to be such a draconian ruler as at first expected. Likewise, the dutiful Greek Lord discovers himself attracted to the wild Turkish maiden. However, the country and laws he has sworn to honour forbid his infatuation for her. This forbidden passion, this desire for a love so beautiful that it defies the imagination could destroy everything. Will the strong willed Leah succumb to temptation and elope with the man whom her people despise? Will the dutiful Greek lord disregard the rules of his nation and allow himself to become bewitched by one of his own subjects? Will this romance flourish and blossom like the most enchanting of flowers, or will it be squelched forevermore by unyielding rules and boundaries that must never be crossed? Leah and Nicholas' passion could destroy them, but can they live without each other, regardless of the consequences?

Told in a beautiful flourishing language, evocative of heavy emotions and romantic inclinations the tale seamlessly weaves its way through the fourteenth century (B.C.) world of our protagonists. Rich in language and description the romantic atmosphere was enchanting and conducive to the continuation of the tale. Narrated through the perspective of the wild spirited Leah Baal the story follows her and the paths she chooses whether for good or evil. Despite my inclinations toward the realm of horror, I discovered the rich atmosphere and interesting situations portrayed within the tale to be surprisingly enthralling and immensely satisfying.

The characters were well presented and thoroughly brought to life. One could not help but feel as though Leah and Nicholas were real people faced with real dilemmas and experiencing an undeniable love that was so strong it could transcend the boundaries of their confined society if they chose to let it do so. Their sentiments and actions were vividly translated allowing the reader to participate in the tale, acutely experiencing the emotions and dilemmas of the empathetic cast of bright, lively characters.

Throughout the tale myriad interesting situations were brought to life never allowing the drama to stagnate or lose the reader's interest. The tale was unpredictable, dramatic, tragic, and above all romantic. The myriad situations were portrayed vividly and were always entertaining and absorbing. There was never a dull moment. The tale grabs the reader from the beginning and transports them to another world long forgotten yet so vivid and alive in this tale.

The conclusion was satisfying and well presented accurately and efficiently revealing the end of the drama. The writing was evocative and conducive to the romantic, sentimental mood of the tale. Every element was well developed and above all enjoyable creating an epic tale of forbidden love that will be sure to one day become a classic. Highly recommended.

R. Karloff

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Feb 2008 18:06:58 GMT
D. Whitfield says:
For someone who is very voicestrous on this author, how you managed to write 2 reviews one sentence long is beyond me. And I only posted them for Tino's sake, not yours. Which by the way your opinion means nothing to me.

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Feb 2008 18:13:24 GMT
[Deleted by Amazon on 27 Feb 2008 17:10:12 GMT]

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Feb 2008 18:26:34 GMT
[Deleted by Amazon on 29 Feb 2008 12:05:47 GMT]

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Feb 2008 18:50:03 GMT
Sigh. If only the book had been as well written as these reviews.

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Feb 2008 21:58:23 GMT
Flubu says:
That was well spotted. I've checked out a few of the links for "The Quest", with the same results and a growing sense of deja vu.

There does indeed seem to be a great deal of similarity between the way the two books are being marketed, which even extends down to posting the same reviews (just changing the name of the book and author).

This link is worth a look, as it gives the history behind the Kostantino book and why it was removed from Amazon:

http://cloyce.blogspot.com/2006/03/how-not-to-promote-your-book.html

In reply to an earlier post on 26 Feb 2008 10:21:49 GMT
Flubu says:
Well, let's see -- James McNay Brumfield has already visited this book and written several 1-star reviews -- and now Mark (not Twain), which I'll bet pounds to pences, is either David DeMello or Jackson McCrae. All three are self-published authors with books considered by many to be rubbish.

In reply to an earlier post on 26 Feb 2008 17:46:59 GMT
Roger says:
As one of the one star reviews of this awful book, I only wish that my review had been as"fake" as Tino and his friends seem to think as I would then not have to have read the book. Unfortunately, it is sat beside me as I write and I have wasted 9.50 on a piece of appaling writing. My only reason for writing a review was to stop other customers wasting their money.

If Mr. Georgiou had confined his marketing to a series of fake 5 star reviews, I would have smiled and complimented him on a clever piece of marketing. Unfortunately, it rurned into something far more unpleasant and sinister with personal abuse of the type demonstrated above by "V. Winton" and threats which are now being investigated by Amazon's legal department. The fact that these so-called 5 star reviewers in one breath write exotic, flowering reviews and in the next, resort to this sort of aggressive abuse, only provides more evidence that these people are simply names created by Mr. Georgiou. I notice that Amazon have now stopped any further comments from being posted to reviews of this book in order to stop the abuse but it appears that the discussion forums are now being misused for a similar purpose.

I know that some people have now taken this story to the media to try and put a stop to this manipulation of the Amazon review system and if the abuse continues, I shall not hesitate to inform the police.

In reply to an earlier post on 26 Feb 2008 18:05:43 GMT
Deborah says:
Is Mr Georgiou also Mr Konstantinos? I don't know, but having read Nora Robert's page on Wikipedia alongside Mr Georgiou's own page (although it appears this is being considered by Wikipedia for deletion) I'm now thoroughly confused :

Ms Roberts:
"Her family were avid readers, so books were always important in her life.[2] Although she had always made up stories in her head, Roberts did not write as a child, other than essays for school. ... She attended a Catholic school and credits the nuns with instilling in her a sense of discipline.[3]"

Mr Georgiou
"His family were avid readers, so books were always important in his life. Although he had always made up stories in his head, Tino did not write as a child, other than essays for school. He attended a Catholic school and credits the nuns with instilling in him a sense of discipline."

Ms Roberts
"Roberts states that ... she had little else to do.[13][14] While writing down her ideas for the first time, she fell in love with the writing process, and quickly produced six manuscripts.[15] She submitted her manuscripts to Harlequin, the leading publisher of romance novels, but was repeatedly rejected. Roberts says, "I got the standard rejection for the first couple of tries, then my favorite rejection of all time. I received my manuscript back with a nice little note which said that my work showed promise, and the story had been very entertaining and well done. But that they already had their American writer. That would have been Janet Dailey."[16]"

Mr Georgiou
"Tino states that ... he had little else to do. While writing down his ideas for the first time, he fell in love with the writing process, and quickly produced six manuscripts. He submitted his manuscripts to Harlequin, the leading publisher of romance novels, but was repeatedly rejected. Tino says, "I got the standard rejection for the first couple of tries, then my favorite rejection of all time. I received my manuscript back with a nice little note which said that my work showed promise, and the story had been very entertaining and well done. But that they already had their American writer." That would have been Janet Dailey."

Ms Roberts
"Roberts and her career were featured in Pamela Regis's A Natural History of the Romance Novel. Regis calls Roberts "a master of the romance novel form, because she "has a keen ear for dialogue, constructs deft scenes, maintains a page-turning pace, and provides compelling characterization."[16]"

Mr Georgiou
"In both 1999 and 2000, USAToday listed him as "romance readers will begin to associate his name with multigenerational sagas. Tino is a master of the romance novel form, because he has a keen ear for dialogue, constructs deft scenes, maintains a page-turning pace, and provides compelling characterization."[citation needed]"

But Ms Roberts doesn't list Tino Georgiou as one of her pseudonyms.

In reply to an earlier post on 26 Feb 2008 18:17:52 GMT
CJ says:
Wow - good detective work Deborah! Have you reported this to anyone? Perhaps Nora should be told?

In reply to an earlier post on 26 Feb 2008 18:22:12 GMT
Roger says:
Well done Deborah. Now let's see what sort of abuse we get tonight!

In reply to an earlier post on 26 Feb 2008 18:28:36 GMT
Stig says:
No-one and I mean no-one at all B.H. could be jealous of this book. It's the biggest load of ridiculous twaddle I have ever read.
If a modicum of the attention and energy lavished on this deeply unpleasant and abusive publicity campaign had been put into the writing of this book in the first place it might have rendered it slightly more readable.There again, given the appalling mangling of the English language by its author and the swift descent into inchoherent and puerile abuse on the part of its admirers at the slightest contradiction, probably not.
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Discussion in:  The Fates forum
Participants:  25
Total posts:  318
Initial post:  25 Feb 2008
Latest post:  17 Oct 2011

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