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Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (with Original Illustrations)
 
 

Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (with Original Illustrations) [Kindle Edition]

Frederick Douglass
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

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Product Description

Product Description

Life and Times of Frederick Douglass is Frederick Douglass' third autobiography, published in 1881, revised in 1892. Because of the emancipation of American slaves during and following the American Civil War, Douglass gave more details about his life as a slave and his escape from slavery in this volume than he could in his two previous autobiographies (which would have put him and his family in danger). It is the only one of Douglass' autobiographies to discuss his life during and after the Civil War, including his encounters with American presidents such as Lincoln and Garfield, his account of the ill-fated "Freedman's Bank", and his service as the United States Marshall of the District of Columbia.

• Digitized illustrations (Kindle-friendly). I have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original.
• A neat table of contents for quicker navigation
• Fonts have been optimized and tested for display on Kindle and other e-readers
• This is the complete, unabridged edition


Synopsis

The progress of his life from a slave to a leader in the movements for emancipation and Negro labor are recounted by this nineteenth-century black leader.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 3987 KB
  • Print Length: 546 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00J9T1B7E
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,194,017 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars WOW!! 9 Feb 2013
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
What a man!! What things he went through to get to his goals. Well written and very informative.Loved it from start to finish.
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Amazon.com: 4.7 out of 5 stars  45 reviews
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Life and Times of Frederick Douglass 13 July 2012
By May - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Part slave narrative, part political memoir, this book is very touching and inspiring, as well as very insightful in describing the disastrous moral, religious, social and political effects of slavery on the United States.

Despite many bitter experiences, Frederick Douglass seems to have been a very noble and kindhearted person, who cared deeply for the elevation of his people. I also admired his willingness to learn and to change his views when appropriate. As a young man, after escaping to Massachusetts from a harsh life as a slave in Maryland, he became a staunch follower of William Lloyd Garrison. According to the Garrisonians, the Constitution of the United States, since it allowed for slavery in the South, was a pro-slavery document, and, therefore, any participation in the American political system was morally wrong. Abolitionists, Douglass thought, should refrain from voting, and the Northern states should immediately dissolve the Union with the Southern states. Later, after further research and study, Douglass broke with the Garrisonians. He concluded that the Constitution was actually an anti-slavery document, and that the American political system was intended to promote liberty and justice. Thereafter, Douglass' concern became preserving the Union and working to end slavery within the framework of the Constitution. He put this determination to great effect during the Civil War, actively recruiting black troops for the Union cause.

Like many abolitionists, Douglass initially despised Abraham Lincoln for tolerating slavery where it already existed in the South, and for merely opposing its extension into new territories in the hope that this containment would ultimately lead to the extinction of slavery. After actually meeting Lincoln, however, Douglass developed a deep personal admiration and affection for the President. In the fragile and explosive political climate of the time, Douglass also came to appreciate the prudence of Lincoln's incremental approach to emancipation and black civil rights. (By contrast, Douglass thoroughly disapproved of Lincoln's successor, Andrew Johnson). Nonetheless, Lincoln and Douglass still had their disagreements. On one occasion, Douglass arrived at the White House to seek justice for black Union prisoners murdered or sold into slavery by the Confederates. Outraged, the fiery Douglass recommended that Lincoln should immediately retaliate upon Southern prisoners, whether or not they had personally been involved in the crimes, but Lincoln was understandably upset at the idea of punishing the innocent for the guilty. He also worried that retaliation would lead to a vicious cycle of brutality and revenge. (Eventually, he did issue a retaliatory order, but it was not enforced). In his memoir, Douglass says he respected Lincoln's humane spirit, but still could not agree with him...

After the war, Douglass was naturally overjoyed that slavery had finally come to an end. Yet, he also felt a strange sense of sadness and regret, as if the noblest part of his life were over. He soon realized, however, that there was still much work to be done, and devoted the rest of his life to helping his fellow freedmen to rise.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A powerful book, on many levels. 25 Oct 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Library Binding
This book, written in Douglass' later years, not only lifted my spirits but did a great deal to reestablish my faith in humanity. This was a man who had every opportunity, and reason, to be bitter and/or vengeful. He, instead, chose to fight, with his intellect and his golden tongue, for what he, and others chained in slavery and social subservience, rightfully disserved as a member of our human race. He was a man of conviction and inner strength who taught himself to write with an elegance that I have never seen equaled. I strongly recommend this book.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Frederick Douglass, Hero 10 Jan 2010
By Maryallene Otis - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This is an inspiring book. Born a slave, it took monumental courage and tenacity for Douglass to become the scholar, activist and leader that he describes in this book. His writing is both powerful and beautiful. Despite all the brutality and injustice in his early life, he never became bitter and never gave up. He also judged men one at a time, regardless of race. If you are looking for some motivation and inspiration to spur you on in life, if you want to read about a real hero, I highly recommend this book.
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A powerful book, on many levels. 9 Nov 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This book, written in Douglass' later years, not only lifted my spirits but did a great deal to reestablish my faith in humanity. This was a man who had every opportunity, and reason, to be bitter and/or vengeful. He, instead, chose to fight, with his intellect and his golden tongue, for what he, and others chained in slavery and social subservience, rightfully disserved as a member of our human race. He was a man of conviction and inner strength who taught himself to write with an elegance that I have never seen equaled. I strongly recommend this book.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Must read! 5 Jan 2008
By Me - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I think this is a must-read book. Douglass is a wonderful example of a man who "made lemonade out of lemons." Really, he is a terrific role model...a man of integrity, incredible intelligence, and an overflowing heart.
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