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Time Stands Still: New Light on Megalithic Science Paperback – 14 Jun 2007

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Product details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Floris Books; 2nd Revised edition edition (14 Jun. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0863155871
  • ISBN-13: 978-0863155871
  • Product Dimensions: 23.8 x 21 x 1.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 125,567 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

'Time Stands Still is a call for and example of the revitalising needed in several areas of science today ... Time Stands Still is a good example of interdisciplinary research. With its fine photographs and strong Platonic insights it is also a good encouragement for further observation-participation and meditation at our ancient sites!' -- Archetype 'This book is one of the classics of new antiquarian literature, and the reissue, with an update, is welcome ... Informed by western and Indian classical, this book provides an argument for the sacred nature of the inspiration behind megalithic culture. Fascinating and inspirational throughout, it is an antidote to the view that science is inherently anti-metaphysical.' -- Northern Earth, Winter 2007 'As an archaeological book, it tries to sympathetically comprehend the megalithic mind and the feats of cosmic architectural orientation achieved in an age without written words or numbers. It aims explicitly to understand the builders of the stone circles on their own terms and begins to explore what kind of knowledge they were using ... It is however more than a book about stones: it strives to rediscover the wisdom stream that underlay the mathematical, geometric, and cosmic architecture embodied in the stone circles and sculpted into stone figures. It is a diverse and interdisciplinary study using anthropology, psychology, mythology, architecture, linguistics, philosophy and numerology.' --Alexander Murrell, New View 'Critchlow's book can help us to regain an understanding of a deeper reality ... it is good to have this outstanding book in print again.' -- Caduceus, Autumn 2007 'Beautifully illustrated' -- Scientific and Medical Network Review, Summer 2007 'A revised publication of a seminal book. Brilliant!' -- Nexus Magazine, December 2007

About the Author

Professor Keith Critchlow is a well-known lecturer and author. He is a founder member of RILKO (Research Into Lost Knowledge Organisation), a founder member and Director of Studies of Kairos and a founder member and President of the Temenos Academy. He has been a senior lecturer at the Architectural Association in London and has taught Islamic Art at the Royal College of Art; he now lectures worldwide on architecture and sacred geometry. His many previous books include Order in Space, Islamic Patterns: An Analytical and Cosmological Approach, Markings: Aerial Views of Sacred Landscapes, and Soul as Sphere and Androgyne.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Dr. H. A. Jones TOP 500 REVIEWER on 9 Jun. 2012
Format: Paperback
Time Stands Still: New light on megalithic science by Keith Critchlow, Gordon Fraser Gallery, London, 1979; 2nd edn. Floris Books, Edinburgh 2007; 240 pp.

Megaliths and maths

Keith Critchlow is a professor of art and architecture with many books to his credit. This is what would sometimes be called a `coffee-table' book because it is so beautifully produced on quality paper with 180 illustrations. About half of these are full-colour photographs while the other half are black and white line drawings, usually geometrical or astrological in nature. The author is a well-known scholar of the sacred geometry used in prehistoric architecture, so his studies described here could equally well be described as archaeology or anthropology - or even `history of numbers'. Amongst Critchlow's mentors was Richard Buckminster Fuller, creator of the geodesic dome.

Professor Critchlow shows us in this book that, long before the lives of Euclid or Pythagoras, ancient civilizations had extensive knowledge of geometry and astronomy and how to use this information in building their megalithic temples to honour their gods: `The manpower alone required to raise these monuments is astounding' - so we should also include civil engineering amongst their skills. The effort demanded for the construction of such structures is a clear indication that these peoples believed that there exists a numinous realm beyond the physical.

Modern determination to raise the living standards of `primitive' people has meant that we have influenced them politically, economically, theologically and ideologically, so that many ancient traditions have been lost in the process.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Gus Wylie on 10 Sept. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Although I have known this book for some considerable time, I was utterly delighted to note that - unlike some reprints often are - this classic book has been merely re-organised and the editorial team has left not only its fine line drawings and explanations wholly intact but had also used the original photographs of Rod Bull's imaginative work. I knew Rod Bull at one time, and Keith Critchlow was at the Royal College of Art at the same time as I was and so it was gratifying that their work had not in any way been diminished. Clear and lucid explanations, coupled to the celebrated work of Professor Alexander Thom, give this book a feeling of exhilaration when not only reading it but also when seeing the context of the landscapes within which the discourse is framed, and avoids the blandness of so much academic discourse. Bought through Amazon for a professional colleague, this is one to treasure again and again, and was the springboard for the research for so much of my own photographic work some forty years ago in the Western Isles, Gus Wylie (Dr)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By M. littler on 4 Sept. 2013
Format: Paperback
A well presented book, well written and with every page splendidly illustrated with beautiful photography and informative diagrams on quality paper.

As an occaisional read, this could be a delight and an inspiration to further study. Opening the book at any page will give a taste of some facet of symbolic aspects of number and form, and relation to the geometry of megalithic rings.
This is linked back to ancient Hindu texts and the Greeks, as these are often our earliest written sources for beginning to understand the "meanings" of these forms.

I am no student of architecture, or symbolic art. This must add to the challenge of this book.
The concepts and understandings proposed here are far from modern life experiences.
Learning to understand things from outside your current familiar environment can only be expected to be hard work.

Reading the book from front to back was very challenging and tiring for me. I might have a better understanding after doing it, but I feel more like I have just bumped into a completely alien culture and managed to survive it. I feel like I need to read it again, but I haven't the energy yet.

I recall that my Grandfather had a very different understanding of numbers from me. He was familiar with their nature, and could handle their values and patterns easily in ways that I could not begin to understand. The more that we rely on mechanical methods and electronic calculators to handle numbers for us, the more our understanding of number is devalued. If two generations can give rise to a visible loss of understanding, then what chance do we have when trying to trace back 5,000 years?
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Robert Griggs on 22 Aug. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've not finished this yet, but have been put off by the very slow start, the lack of science and the constant referral to greek philosophers! It is now beginning to look at actual stone circles, but the journey has been too long!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Puts you in the mind of our ancestors 20 Oct. 2010
By K. Webster - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The author begins the book by really laying the context of how our ancestors may have seen the Earth and universe. Think about it... How would not having writing effect how you think and even imagine the world around you? How would you solve problems without the formal math of today? I rarely see a historical survey start with first setting the stage of the actors of the time period in question. We so often take for granted that they are like us today, just without 'stuff' of modern convenience. Chances are, our ancestors thought, related and felt ALOT differently then we do today. This approach adds an authenticity to this book that is captivating and authoritative.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Megaliths and maths 28 Jun. 2012
By Dr. H. A. Jones - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Time Stands Still: New light on megalithic science by Keith Critchlow, Gordon Fraser Gallery, London, 1979; 2nd edn. Floris Books, Edinburgh 2007; 240 pp.

Keith Critchlow is a professor of art and architecture with many books to his credit. This is what would sometimes be called a `coffee-table' book because it is so beautifully produced on quality paper with 180 illustrations. About half of these are full-colour photographs while the other half are black and white line drawings, usually geometrical or astrological in nature. The author is a well-known scholar of the sacred geometry used in prehistoric architecture, so his studies described here could equally well be described as archaeology or anthropology - or even `history of numbers'. Amongst Critchlow's mentors was Richard Buckminster Fuller, creator of the geodesic dome.

Professor Critchlow shows us in this book that, long before the lives of Euclid or Pythagoras, ancient civilizations had extensive knowledge of geometry and astronomy and how to use this information in building their megalithic temples to honour their gods: `The manpower alone required to raise these monuments is astounding' - so we should also include civil engineering amongst their skills. The effort demanded for the construction of such structures is a clear indication that these peoples believed that there exists a numinous realm beyond the physical.

Modern determination to raise the living standards of `primitive' people has meant that we have influenced them politically, economically, theologically and ideologically, so that many ancient traditions have been lost in the process. Critchlow believes that `the greatest threat our modern industrial culture poses for mankind is the denial of its spiritual heritage'. Worship within their temples of megaliths was just one aspect of their culture, though clearly an important one. He suggests that human wisdom is to be gained as much from these megaliths located in their inspirational natural surroundings as from libraries, universities or new technology. Both trees and the megaliths of natural stones used to fashion the temples of early peoples were believed to be imbued with the spirit of the sacred. It is this spirituality that must surely have provided the incentive for the huge physical effort involved in the construction of these artefacts.

The modern archaeologist learns not so much from intellectual effort but from becoming part of the spiritual experience: `. . . more and more scientists and scholars are realizing that it is they themselves who are the ultimate instruments by which all their data . . . must be evaluated'. Synthesizing the work of other archaeologists, Critchlow claims that there is an overwhelming amount of evidence to suggest the existence of an extensive archaic Indo-European culture. The ancient myths frequently link together the psychology of their peoples with numerology, cosmic rhythms and thence astrology. Ancient languages - Latin, Sanskrit, Hebrew - have numbers associated with letters of the alphabet. These associations, which embrace also the Kabbalistic Tree of Life and the Vedic chakras, are well and copiously illustrated in the book but unfortunately there is no facility for reproducing any of these representations here.

From Chapter 2 on, Professor Critchlow goes on to explore the geometry behind the construction of various megalithic rings and artefacts found within them, calling on work from Plato to that of the Scottish engineering archaeologist, Alexander Thom. The perimeters of these temples are often elliptical or egg-shaped rather than circular but incorporate the symbolism of the circle and hexagon (representing heaven), the triangle as symbol of humankind, and the square representing the stability of earthly experience. The sophisticated geometry that has been found, with its relation to astronomical events, indicates that the builders of these monuments had a sophisticated knowledge of number, geometry and astronomy long before the time of the ancient Greek philosophers.

This is a lovely, fascinating book for anyone interested in the work of the ancient temple builders, but a feel for the beauty of geometry would be an advantage for readers.

Sacred Geometry: Deciphering the Code

Howard Jones is the author of Evolution of Consciousness
0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Light is OK 6 Jun. 2013
By W. E. Sullivan - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Interesting; Historical looks at historical Stone/Constructions.
Validates that early societies really used Markers to markm& track astronomical events
Nothing that stood out from other similar books tho.
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