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Time to Emigrate? Paperback – 9 Nov 2006

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Product details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Gibson Square Books Ltd; First Edition edition (9 Nov. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1903933935
  • ISBN-13: 978-1903933930
  • Product Dimensions: 31.8 x 2.2 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 714,837 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

'Frank... and even affectionate.' -- Evening Standard

'Unashamedly contentious.'
-- Daily Mail

`Catches the Zeitgeist.' -- Independent

`I love the book.' -- Marcus Brigstocke

`Provocative.' -- Daily Telegraph

From the Publisher

In an explosive new book, "Time to Emigrate?", the author
George Walden concludes that the future is so uncertain and pessimistic for
millions of middle class families that the only secure option is to
emigrate. This sober factual overview of day to day life in Britain, by a
former government minister, MP and father of three children shows how
middle-income earners such as nurses, small businessmen, police officers
and teachers are hardest hit and are no longer represented by Government or
the authorities. Written as a letter from a father concerned about his
children's future and the impending pessimism within our country, Walden
outlines a series of breaking points to life in Britain. The idea for "Time
to Emigrate?" first came about when one of George Walden's sons asked him
whether he should emigrate. He set about writing down a few of his thoughts
in a letter. The notes grew and grew. When Walden discovered that many of
his son's generation were considering the same question he decided to use
his notes for "Time to Emigrate?" an exceptionally provocative book that
attacks the onslaught of multiculturalism.

Customer Reviews

3.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

48 of 49 people found the following review helpful By Roland Hulme on 26 April 2007
Format: Paperback
Ex Tory MP George Walden like writing letters. Which is a good thing too, since he currently does it for the Times Literary Supplement.

But even the most dedicated correspondent would be daunted by the thought of writing a 200 page letter - but that's exactly what Walden did, during a brief holiday he spent in France. You can discover just what he had to say in Time to Emigrate?

Walden was scribbling to his son, who'd just dropped the bombshell that he and his wife were thinking of emigrating. Their young son had been viciously beaten by a thug just yards from their front door. As the boy emerged from his coma, his thankful parents started to wonder just how safe their "safe" part of North London truly was.

George's letter starts off as a candid response to that suggestion - but evolves into a critical and pessimistic appraisal of modern Britain - and exactly where it's going.

Response to Time to Emigrate? has varied wildly. Some people think it's splendid stuff. Other people have labelled it a bitter rant by a bigoted old Tory. I don't think either of those views are even close to the truth. Walden's letter is just that - a letter he wrote to his son. There's no political manifesto here. The book's puffed-up pomposity is softened by some genuine introspection from George Walden. Unlike many other extended editorials, you genuinely get the feeling that Walden didn't quite know which side of the fence he'd end up on when he started writing Time to Emigrate? I think that's why there's a question mark at the end of the title.

The major controversy of the book concerns the target for most of Walden's criticism. Immigrants. Not the immigrants themselves - Walden's book is forthright about his views, but never crosses into racism.
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40 of 44 people found the following review helpful By J. P. Maciag on 13 Nov. 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Time to Emigrate? Is not a measured argument for or against leaving Britain. This is an emotional lament by a writer who is saddened by the way his country has changed, largely, for the worse. The underlying energy of the writing is unquestionably angry. But the tone is `post Christmas dinner' avuncular where the sherry proceeds to let out all the disgraceful family secrets in a gentle, opinionated and straightforward manner. It is the heartfelt nature of the advice, observations and opinions that make reading this book akin to overhearing an outrageously candid, politically incorrect and immensely entertaining conversation on a topic of deadly seriousness.

My only complaint is that the pace slows down towards the end of the book as the complexity of the issue is overwhelmed by the writer's obvious personal wish that his son not leave. For that same reason, the book does not come to a simple conclusion. Perhaps this is correct as the decision is, ultimately, a personal one but with thousands of UK nationals leaving daily, this book is certainly food for thought.
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31 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Stephen Vizinczey on 16 Nov. 2006
Format: Paperback
I clicked 5 stars and it says somewhere that this means that I love the book. I am not sure love is the right word for what one feels about a chillingly lucid summary of the state of Britain today, setting out painful and mostly unspoken truths. In any case, I could not put it down. I see several columnists were inspired by the issues raised by Walden; I hope they will also comment on it. We tend to see the world as it appeared to us yesterday - which is why this work is so significant. It helps its readers to catch up with the present.
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36 of 41 people found the following review helpful By mark wilson on 9 Nov. 2006
Format: Paperback
I found this book extremely touching, not easy to achieve with such a sensitive subject. The book is written as comment and advice from a father to his grown son (himself now the father of two young children) as he considers leaving the UK for good. The subject of emigrating is seen as a serious option among his son's friends as a way out of their economic and moral trap: can they really offer their children their best possible future by staying in Britain? It is a tough call, it means that the older man will no longer be part of his son's live, that he will probably miss his grandchildren growing up, but he concedes that he really can't see this young family achieving their dreams by staying. The book also covers immigrants into Britain, the rise of terrorism, and the social cost of a stretched education system. Some readers might find his views too candid but who hasn't imagined what it might be like to cash in their chips for a better life?
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By ISCA on 4 Sept. 2007
Format: Paperback
This book is written in the form of a long letter the format of which I found got in the way of the content but after a while this is forgotten. The book is made up of, presumably, true anecdotes from the authors life displaying the decay of modern Britain; and quite scary they are too, statistics are sprinkled throughout where they shed light on his assertions.
His son lived on the edge of what sounded like a complete dump and experiences unpleasant things at the hands of the inhabitants therein. The cost of living is so high that he realises even though he is a lecturer he will never make big bucks. The author (his father) tots up how much it would cost to send all his 9 grand children to private school, a cool million, the future looks bleak. The book ends with the son emigrating to Canada.
The message I took from the book is look after your own because the organs government (police, education & health) won't be there for you.
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