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Timaeus and Critias (Oxford World's Classics) Paperback – 13 Nov 2008

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Product details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford (13 Nov. 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0192807358
  • ISBN-13: 978-0192807359
  • Product Dimensions: 19.3 x 1.5 x 12.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 196,880 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

About the Author

Robin Waterfield has translated numerous classics texts for OWC, including Plato's Republic, Synposium, Gorgias, and Phaedrus, The First Philosophers: The Presocratics and the Sophists,, Aristotle's Physics, Herodotus' Histories, Plutarch and Euripides.

In addition to Plato's Philosophy of Science, Andrew Gregory is the author of Harvey's Heart (Icon, 2000) and Eureka! the Birth of Science (Icon, 2001). His book Ancient Greek Cosmogony is published by Duckworth in December 2007.

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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Dave on 5 July 2010
Format: Paperback
This is my first exposure to Plato and I was pleasantly surprised. If like me, you were forced to study Shakespeare at school (rather than discover it for yourself in later life) it probably turned you off the idea of reading something by an ancient Greek philosopher. However, this modern translation is surprisingly down to Earth. Basically, the Timaeus and Critias are a couple a conversations between a few friends pondering on the origins of life the universe and the ancient Greek nation. Timaeus was finished (but still fairly short) and mentions Atlantis briefly. Critias was never finished (as far as we know) and describes Atlantis is considerable detail. Both were fun to read and I couldn't help looking at my Atlas trying to pinpoint where Atlantis may have been. An easy and fun, easy and exciting read for anyone wishing to "get into" Plato. Highly recommended.
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0 of 6 people found the following review helpful By @garethalteran on 5 Sept. 2011
Format: Paperback
Timaeus is quite laborious. Critias is unfinished. Critias would have been the better text, if it were finished.
Both texts are very detailed, but not tremendously engaging or exciting.

I'd far sooner recommend The Republic.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
Best introduction to the Timaeus 24 Feb. 2014
By Steve L - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Sure, this is a translation of the Timaeus, but it actually could also be called an introduction to the Timaeus... because it's the best introductory Timaeus book I've seen. Why? First, the book has a clearly written, extensive introduction (48 pages!) that covers all the major themes of the Timaeus. It's like a mini-book in itself. Second, the book has a ton of explanatory notes (many of them extensive) that go along with the translation. Finally, Waterfield has tried as hard as he can to make the translation clear and readable -- the language is modern (but not anachronistic) and flows well (as well as it can, that is, given the content). If you're looking to learn about the Timaeus, I'd highly recommend getting this, and would definitely recommend reading the introduction first. Note: Cornford's "Plato's Cosmology"

http://www.amazon.com/Platos-Cosmology-The-Timaeus-Plato/dp/0872203867

is also helpful for learning about the Timaeus -- it basically gives a paragraph-by-paragraph commentary. But it's a bit more advanced than Waterfield and also analyzes EVERYTHING, which doesn't help if you're trying to figure out the main themes. I'd suggest looking at Cornford after reading Waterfield, or perhaps while reading Waterfield.
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
bad notes 1 Aug. 2014
By Luca - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The notes to this edition are quite poor, many things wrong and misrepresented. Go with Kalkavage. Zeyl second. If you're serious you should also have the Loeb edition.
2 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Terrific Translation, wonderful reference 14 Mar. 2013
By Pam - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have been wanting to read this for as long as I can remember, and I'm trilled with this version. It's too bad this Plato guy isn't still writing - ha ha ha
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