Trade in Yours
For a 2.39 Gift Card
Trade in
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Tell the Publisher!
Id like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Thunder at Twilight: Vienna 1913-1914 [Paperback]

Frederic Morton
4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)

Available from these sellers.


Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover --  
Paperback 12.99  
Paperback, 12 July 2001 --  
Trade In this Item for up to 2.39
Trade in Thunder at Twilight: Vienna 1913-1914 for an Amazon Gift Card of up to 2.39, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Book Description

12 July 2001
From the author of A Nervous Splendor, a dazzling portrait of the epicenter of the apocalypse that was World War I. Thunder at Twilight is a landmark of historical vision, drawing on hitherto untapped sources to illuminate two crucial years in the life of the extraordinary city of Viennaand in the life of the twentieth century. It was during the carnival of 1913 that a young Stalin arrived on a mission that would launch him into the upper echelon of Russian revolutionaries, and it was here that he first collided with Trotsky. It was in Vienna that the failed artist Adolf Hitler kept daubing watercolors and spouting tirades at fellow drifters in a flophouse. Here Archduke Franz Ferdinand had a troubled audience with Emperor Franz Josephand soon the bullet that killed the archduke would set off the Great War that would kill ten million more. With luminous prose that has twice made him a finalist for the National Book Award, Frederic Morton evokes the opulent, elegant, incomparable sunset metropolisVienna on the brink of cataclysm.
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.


Product details

  • Paperback: 396 pages
  • Publisher: Methuen Publishing Ltd; New edition edition (12 July 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0413764702
  • ISBN-13: 978-0413764706
  • Product Dimensions: 21.2 x 13.4 x 3.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,277,928 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

About the Author

Frederic Morton was born in Vienna and lives in New York City. His short stories have been chosen for Best American Short Stories, and two of his critically acclaimed nonfiction works, "The Rothschilds" and "A Nervous Splendor, " have been best sellers. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
First Sentence
ON THE EVENING OF JANUARY 13, 1913. VIENNA'S BANK EMPLOYEES' Club gave a Bankruptcy Ball. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.8 out of 5 stars
4.8 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
By Mary Whipple HALL OF FAME TOP 100 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
Focusing on just two climactic years, 1913 - 1914, Frederic Morton recreates Vienna in all its splendor during the last days of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. The vibrant social, intellectual, and cultural life of Vienna is examined within the context of the seething nationalism of the Balkans, the Machiavellian intrigue among the political rulers of the European nations and Russia, and the human frailties of the seemingly larger-than-life national leaders, which assure that the twilight of the empire will eventually be overtaken by darkness.
Rigorously selective in his choice of detail, Morton brings to life the varied activities of a broad cross-section of Viennese society, and reproduces the intellectual milieu which eventually leads to the rise of some of the most influential leaders of the twentieth century--Trotsky, Stalin, Adler, Freud, Jung, Lenin, Hitler, Tito, and a host of others, all of whom are part of Vienna life.
Morton's seriousness of purpose and his scholarship are undeniable, yet his primary contribution here, it seems to me, is his ability to make historical personages come to life, to make the reader feel that they were real, breathing humans with both virtues and frailties, and not the cardboard characters one finds so often in history books. Vienna, as we see it here, has a real heart, albeit one that beats in 3/4 time.
From the masquerades and balls held by all classes of society, to the revolutionary movements, innumerable newspapers and pamphlets, lively coffee houses, and seemingly endless games of political maneuvering, one feels the ferment and activity which must lead, eventually, to change.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
By Mary Whipple HALL OF FAME TOP 100 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
Choosing to focus on just two climactic years, Morton manages to recreate not only the splendor of the last days of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, but the vibrant intellectual and cultural life of Vienna, the seething nationalism of the Balkans, the Machiavellian intrigue among the political rulers of the European nations and Russia, and the human frailties of the seemingly larger-than-life characters presented here. Best of all, Morton is rigorously selective in his choice of detail, bringing to life the activities of a broad cross-section of Viennese society in 1913-1914, while simultaneously recreating the intellectual ambience which made possible the later rise of some of the most influential leaders of the twentieth century--Trotsky, Stalin, Adler, Freud, Jung, Lenin, Hitler, Tito, and a host of others.
Morton's seriousness of purpose and his scholarship are undeniable, yet his primary contribution here, it seems to me, is his ability to make these historical personages come to life, to make the reader feel that they were real, breathing humans with both virtues and frailties, and not the cardboard characters one finds so often in history books. Vienna, too, has a real heart, albeit beating in time. From its masquerades and balls by all classes of society, to its revolutionary movements, innumerable newspapers and pamphlets, lively coffee houses, and seemingly endless games of political oneupsmanship, one feels the ferment and activity which must lead, eventually, to change. The liveliness of the city is a visual and intellectual contrast to the formality and frailty of Emperor Franz Josef, making the twilight of his empire understandable and its demise inevitable. But even the demise is stylish--as "The World War [came] to the city by the Danube, [it came] dressed as a ball. Tra-la...Hurrah!" Mary Whipple
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Consummate background to the sound of guns 3 Feb 2008
By Julie Cutler TOP 500 REVIEWER VINE VOICE
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Building on his experiences writing his previous 2 year background to the death by suicide of the previous Austrian Crown Prince (Rudolf) ("A Nervous Splendour: Vienna, 1888-89"), Morton has developed in confidence as a social historian. I think the best thing about his writing is that it is so stuffed with snippets of information that you select in your own mind the themes that best attract you.

All I particularly knew about the subject was "archduke assassinated, Sarajevo-start of World War One." Franz Ferdinand, a second uneasy peace-making prince in waiting to the aged Emperor Franz Josef dies a tragically violent death on his wedding anniversary after surviving the previous assassination attempt earlier that day. With him dies his wife Sophie- who he married for love in defiance of the Establishment. In revenge the Establishment forced him to accept that her mere descent from nobility rather than through the Habsburgs's centuries long inbreeding scheme meant that she would always be several turns down in official ceremonies and that their children could never inherit. Court officials would even snootily deny her accommodation in Imperial Palaces until the ageing Franz Josef had graciously dispensed with the natural order - for that one occasion only. Naturally in 21st century Britain we can look down on this royal flimflam from a bygone age (Don't mention the Duchess of Cornwall! I did once, but I think I got away with it). He receives no state funeral. He liked roses a lot.

What Morton emphasises is how strange it is that in the previous year Stalin, Trotsky, Hitler and Tito were all present in smugly conventional Vienna.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Would you like to see more reviews about this item?
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Thunder at Twilight: Vienna 1913/1914
The author wrote an earlier book about life and times in Vienna – A Nervous Splendor: Vienna 1888/1889 which covered a two year period when life in Vienna seemed to change forever;... Read more
Published 26 days ago by Keen Reader
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent historical fiction
Fantastic read. Author puts a convincing and captivating twist on the crucial moments leading up to the First World War. Recommended reading for the 100th anniversary.
Published 5 months ago by Ed
4.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful tale of an end of an era!
Morton weaves together the stories of some of the most famous personages of the twentieth century who all happened to be in Vienna in 1913/1914. Read more
Published 6 months ago by R Helen
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant
Brilliantly evokes a long lost and more gracious world. Vienna was the cultural capital of the world in the early part of the 20th century.
Published 9 months ago by Adi H. Jehangir
5.0 out of 5 stars Vivid and spellbinding
This splendidly evocative book tells the story of events leading up to the outbreak of the first world war from the viewpoint of Vienna's citizens both ordinary and exalted as they... Read more
Published on 20 Jan 2010 by birchden
5.0 out of 5 stars Style
I am just getting into this book and am nowhere near as erudite as other reviewers but had to write this just to comment upon Morton's style. It's wonderful! Read more
Published on 11 Dec 2008 by Ascylto
4.0 out of 5 stars Novelistic in parts but worth your time
This was as readable as I expected. It was more informative than I expected about Ferdinand, the politics around him and his assassin. Read more
Published on 25 Feb 2008 by P. Reavy
5.0 out of 5 stars Consumate background to the sound of guns
Building on his experiences writing his previous 2 year background to the death by suicide of the previous Austrian Crown Prince (Rudolf) ("A Nervous Splendour: Vienna, 1888-89"),... Read more
Published on 5 Feb 2008 by Julie Cutler
5.0 out of 5 stars A classic and unique account of a nodal point in history
This book should be read by anyone with a genuine interest in the watershed that began the First World War. Read more
Published on 17 Sep 2001
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback