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Throne of the Crescent Moon MP3 CD – 31 Dec 2012

3.9 out of 5 stars 30 customer reviews

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--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.
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Product details

  • MP3 CD
  • Publisher: Brilliance Corporation; MP3 Una edition (31 Dec. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1455878421
  • ISBN-13: 978-1455878420
  • Product Dimensions: 13.3 x 1.3 x 17.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)

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Product Description

Review

Isn't just an epic fantasy reskinned. Smartly written, with a cluster of likable characters. (SFX MAGAZINE) -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Paperback.

Book Description

A striking new voice in fantasy introduces us to a new world and an old mythology. -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Hardcover.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I read Saladin Ahmed’s The Throne of the Crescent Moon on a bit of whim (and ages ago now, so excuse the shorter review) when my brother and I were looking for something different for me to read to him at night (we are each other’s audiobooks because we’re cool like that). We’d heard good things about it and my brother had—very briefly—started listening to the actual audiobook and liked the setting.

I find it one of the hardest books I have had to review: it is so very different from every other fantasy book I have read that I have nothing to compare it to. Not that comparison is necessary, but I have no basis on which to judge this book apart from how it touched me. The characters, the landscapes, even down to the writing style seemed to carry with them a touch of exoticness so very genuine that it made for a completely different, and wonderful, read.

Ahmed’s characters are a colourful lot, effortlessly deep and real, even those seen only for a couple of pages. There is something in the way that Ahmed writes that brings the characters to life, making them pop off the page in their colourfulness: it’s in the small gestures that tell us more than a page of description could, in the looks exchanged, in the most mundane of interactions that they become so very three dimensional.

I don’t think I found any of the characters dislikeable, and given that some are advanced in age and I sometimes struggle to get attached to older characters (I feel much too young to relate most of the time), there isn’t one member of the cast I wasn’t attached to by the end of the book. Adoulla, Raseed, Zamia, and the other important members of the cast are definitely characters that I would like to see more of.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Dr Abdoulla Makhslood is the last ghul hunter in the city of Dhamsawaat. Aided by the devout Raseed, an 18-year-old Dervish warrior whose faith is tested by the realities of city life, Abdoulla's strength is fading and he's worried about what will happen if he dies. When his former lover, Miri Almoussa seeks his help after her niece and nephew are killed by ghuls, his investigation leads him to the only survivor of a murdered desert tribe - 15 year old Zamia, a shapeshifter able to turn into a lion.

Their investigation reveals a sinister plot to destabilise Dhamsawaat, a city already caught in a battle between the cruel Khalif and self-style Falcon Prince for the soul of its people. Abdoulla and his friends will have to choose sides if they're to avoid seeing their world turned into a blood-soaked ruin ...

Saladin Ahmed's debut novel, the first in a trilogy, is an okay fantasy read but despite its refreshing use of Arabian themes and settings in its world building, its female characters are a depressing mix of wives, whores and virgins, the villains are underdeveloped ciphers and the plot turns on contrivance to propel it. Although I liked the cynical and world-weary Abdoulla enough to check out the remaining books, I won't be hurrying to do so.

Abdoulla is a great character - cynical and world weary, he's torn between his desire for a peaceful retirement and the knowledge that doing so will leave the world defenceless against evil. I enjoyed his teasing of the devout but naïve Raseed and his affection for the boy but wished that Raseed had been developed a little more beyond the stock religious ingénue who finds his worldview challenged.

By contrast the female characters are underdeveloped.
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Format: Hardcover
The Throne of the Crescent Moon is a fun, fast-paced swashbuckling adventure, which presents a fresh and interesting world populated by interesting characters,

Doctor Adoulla Makhslood is an aging ghul hunter (ghuls are zombies or ghouls), who leaves the teeming streets of the grand city of Dhamsawaat to fight murderous supernatural creatures and the men who have created them. His apprentice is a young dervish, Raseed, a religious fanatic with a terrible swift sword arm. Travelling to investigate a ghul attack they find Zamia, a young tribeswoman with supernatural powers who has suffered a great tragedy. It slowly becomes apparent that some powerful sorcerer is at large, and has evil designs on the Doctor's city. Two more characters come into play: Litaz and Dawood, old friends and allies of the Doctor.
Running through this are the exploits of the Falcon Prince, a flamboyant enemy of the current Khalif, who presents himself as a robber-prince helping the poor against their oppressors. As the book kicks into high gear for a swashbuckling conclusion, all of these come together in a deadly threat to the city.

The book is very ambitious, with no less than 5 narrating characters, and can get a bit confusing at times, but overall the author pulls this off well. What he does brilliantly is to evoke some very real and distinctive characters and make them shine - the Doctor is world-weary, but determined to do his duty; Rasheed has his faith tested by meeting Zamia, who herself is struggling with her powers. The portrayal of Litaz and Dawood as a long-standing couple accepting each other while being concerned for the future is particularly well done considering they get the least page-time.
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