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Three Cups Of Tea Paperback – 3 Jan 2008


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Product details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin (3 Jan 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141034262
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141034263
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 2.3 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (440 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 8,326 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

About the Author

Greg Mortenson is the director of the Central Asia Institute, and he spends several months each year building schools in Pakistan and Afghanistan. He lives in Montana with his wife and two children.

David Oliver Relin is a globe-trotting journalist who has won more than forty national awards for his writing and editing. He lives in Portland, Oregon.


Inside This Book (Learn More)
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First Sentence
In Pakistan's Karakoram, bristling across an area barely one hundred miles wide, more than sixty of the world's tallest mountains lord their severe alpine beauty over a witnessless high-altitude wilderness. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

470 of 488 people found the following review helpful By Pumpkin on 1 April 2008
Format: Paperback
I was, until my very recent retirement, the Headteacher of a Church of England primary school where 90% of pupils were Muslim and a majority of those came from the Punjab or Kashmir. I don't normally read non-fiction, but was attracted to this book because of its links to both education and the South Asian Muslim culture.

How glad I am that I chose it. What an inspirational story! I read it in two days. It gave such a true reflection of the real Islam, one which values education and most importantly values the contribution that women make to society. It reflected my experience of the Muslim culture over the many years I have worked with Muslim children and their families. I am neither a Christian, nor a Muslim, but have found that true Christians and Muslims respect each others faith.

Greg Mortenson endured great hardship, two fatwa and long separation from his family to pursue his dream of educational provision for all the children living in those isolated mountain or border regions. What a humanitarian! He really should be awarded the Nobel Peace prize.
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142 of 148 people found the following review helpful By R. Durham on 23 April 2008
Format: Paperback
I strongly, strongly urge you to buy this book. Not only is it a fascinating read and a really entertaining story, the message behind it is utterly inspiring and one which needs to be spread to as many people as possible. If only there were more people in the world like Greg, the man is incredible. I can honestly say that it has fundamentally changed my views on religion, politics and the best way to make the world a safer place for everyone. Everyone i know who has read it feels the same. You won't be disappointed.
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170 of 178 people found the following review helpful By T. Gandhi on 8 Feb 2008
Format: Paperback
Due to lack of time, I normally take 15-20 days to get through a book. This one took only four though!

The book narrates the story of Greg Mortenson who decides to build a school for a village in the North of Pakistan. What inspired me most was the fact that Mortenson, an American national, himself lived 'on the edge' with no accomodation and barely enough money to buy the next meal. However, resolve and commitment to the cause allowed him to generate the necessary funds so that the promised school can be built.

What happened next was inevitable. The experiment proved to be such a success that one after the other he just kept on building schools and the money kept pouring into the accounts of the newly-found charity, Central Asia Institute.

If you have a spark for social responsibility, the book will serve as a catalyst to turn in to a fire. Got get it!
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Caroline+Kats on 24 Jun 2010
Format: Paperback
Having read the book I really admire what Greg Mortenson has done and they way he's risked his life to help others. However the book itself was very hard going I found, not well structured with random accounts of meetings and not a clear link between the events described. One chapter didn't really seem to lead to another, it almost felt I'd started a new book each time I got to a new chapter which was really tiring. This may be because the person who was writing it didn't actually experience what was being written about, I am not sure. I did persist to the end as it was a book group choice, and know much more now about the politics of the area etc as a result, but so many times I could have put it down and not picked it up again. However as I say I am amazed by what Greg and his team have done, a real lesson to us all to be more tolerant and not view a whole nation in a certain way because of what we are fed on the TV etc.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By John Speakman on 6 Dec 2009
Format: Paperback
Greg Mortenson was an American mountaineer. In 1993 after a failed attempt to climb K2, disoriented and both physically and mentally drained, he wandered into a village in the Karokoram mountains where he was looked after by the local people. Noticing that the village children were sitting outside to have lessons he promised the head of the village that for their kindness he would return with the resources to build them a school. This book is the story of that promise and how it grew into the Central Asian Institute (CAI) that has now built over 50 schools across the whole of northern Pakistan and Afghanistan.

There is an argument that taking books to this area will be far more effective for our long term future stability and peace than taking troops and bombs, and for this reason several people have suggested Greg Mortenson should be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Having read this book I would strongly support this suggestion. It seems to me his claim to it is infinitely stronger than that of Barak Obama who had only been in office a few days when he was nominated for the prize and has just sent 30000 troops there! I hope the Nobel committee are feeling suitably sheepish.

After I finished reading the book I was astounded to see that some people had only rated it with 1 or 2 stars. One criticism in these reviews was that Mortenson gets paid for doing his work from the Institute he established while others like missionaries do similar stuff for free. However, I think this is a flawed argument. Missionaries build schools to push their religion on people. Mortenson and the CAI doesn't.
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