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Three Colours: Red [DVD] [1994]

Irène Jacob , Jean-Louis Trintignant , Krzysztof Kieslowski    Suitable for 15 years and over   DVD
4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
Price: £6.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
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Frequently Bought Together

Three Colours: Red [DVD] [1994] + Three Colours: White [DVD] [1994] + Three Colours: Blue [DVD] [1993]
Price For All Three: £22.38

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Product details

  • Actors: Irène Jacob, Jean-Louis Trintignant, Frédérique Feder, Jean-Pierre Lorit, Samuel Le Bihan
  • Directors: Krzysztof Kieslowski
  • Writers: Krzysztof Kieslowski, Krzysztof Piesiewicz
  • Producers: Marin Karmitz, Yvon Crenn
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: French
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Artificial Eye
  • DVD Release Date: 29 Oct 2001
  • Run Time: 95 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00005QG0K
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 20,286 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

From Amazon.co.uk

The final section of the late Krzysztof Kieslowski's acclaimed Three Colours trilogy (preceded by Blue and White) is the least likely of the three to stand alone, and indeed benefits from a little familiarity with the first two parts. Nevertheless, it's a strong, unique piece that reflects upon the ubiquity of images in the modern world and the parallel subjugation of meaningful communication. Irène Jacob plays a fashion model whose lovely face is hugely enlarged on a red banner no one in Geneva, Switzerland, can possibly miss seeing. Striking up a relationship with an embittered former judge (Jean-Louis Trintignant), who secretly scans his neighbours' conversations through electronic surveillance, Jacob's character becomes an aural witness to the secret lives of those we think we know. Kieslowski cleverly wraps up the trilogy with a device that brings together the principals of all three films. --Tom Keogh

Product Description

The final section of the late Krzysztof Kieslowskis acclaimed Three Colors trilogy (preceded by Blue and White) is the least likely of the three to stand alone, and indeed benefits from a little familiarity with the first two parts. Nevertheless, its a strong, unique piece that reflects upon the ubiquity of images in the modern world and the parallel subjugation of meaningful communication. Irene Jacob plays a fashion model whose lovely face is hugely enlarged on a red banner no one in Geneva can possibly miss seeing. Striking up a relationship with an embittered former judge (Jean-Louis Trintignant), who secretly scans his neighbors conversations through electronic surveillance, Jacobs character becomes an aural witness to the secret lives of those we think we know. Kieslowski cleverly wraps up the trilogy with a device that brings together the principals of all three films. --Tom Keogh

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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
4.7 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Glowing red 7 Mar 2006
By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAME TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:DVD
Despite being the finale of the critically acclaimed "Colors" trilogy, "Red" ("Rouge") need not be seen after the similarly beloved "Blue" ("Bleu") and "White" ("Blanc"). As warm and rich as the shades of red scattered through it, this film is one of the most compelling non-American releases in years.
On her way home from a modelling session, Valentine (Irene Jacob) accidently runs over and injures a pregnant dog. The owner is Joseph Kern, (Jean-Louis Trintignant) an embittered, cynical ex-judge whose years of condemnation and acquittal have left him spiritually adrift. He now spends his time alone in his house, wiretapping the phones of his neighbors and predicting what will happen in their lives.
After Valentine expresses disgust at Joseph's activities, he turns himself in to the authorities. Their friendship grows into a bond of differing values and unhappy histories. As Valentine prepares to leave for England, the judge reveals the tragic circumstances of his early life -- a tragedy mirrored by some of the people he has been spying on.
Where "Blue" was cool and sensual and "White" was sharp and sexy, "Red" has a sweetness and richness to its story. Valentine's name suggests love, and that love -- a platonic friendship that teeters on romantic love -- brings Joseph back from his unhealthy cynicism. Her kindness and unhappiness appeal to him, reassuring him that people are not intrinsically bad. His spiritual transformation is subtle, but convincing; it's mirrored by the sun shining down on him near the film's end.
Few filmmakers could pull off the symbolism that springs up in any of the "Colors" movies. In this one, red springs up everywhere -- walls, glasses, jeeps, lipstick, clothing, phones, bowling balls, little lights lining a model runway.
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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Red - the best film ever made 25 Nov 2001
By A Customer
Format:DVD
Those who have seen all three may disagree. If you class the trilogy as one film then I would certainly say it is the best. But if I was allowed to watch only one more film before I die then I would choose Red over the other two. It centres on the relationship between a model and a bitter judge which starts frostily, but by the end of the film has developed into one of deep mutual respect and understanding. It is the manner in which this is achieved however, that marks this film as a cinematic masterpiece. The dialogue and characters are original and fascinating. Set alongside fantastic cinematography and a beautiful score, the whole thing wraps up the theme of brotherhood with breathtaking humanity and skill. A warm, optimistic and intelligent film that everybody should see.
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25 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the greatest films of the 1990's. 18 July 2005
Format:DVD
I find Blue, the first film in this loose, thematic trilogy, to be a little ponderous... brilliant, but ponderous. White is exceptional, though I'm aware that not many viewers would share that personal opinion. However, what is clear - having been noted by a number of professional critics and Internet fans all over the world - is that Three Colours Red is really the absolute creative pinnacle, not just of this series of films, but of Kieslowski's career as a whole.
The film has many similarities with Kieslowski's earlier film, The Double Life of Veronique. Here, as in that film, we have Irene Jacob portraying a deeply sad young woman, searching for a sense of meaning within the confusion of everyday life. Now, this brief assessment is in no way an accurate retelling of the events of the film, with Kieslowski once again drawing on his favourites themes and motifs, including cultural and chronological dislocation - in which two seemingly disparate storylines come together alongside a different story which could very easily be seen as a retelling of the actual film - and the prevailing notion of chance, which was a major component in much of Kieslowski's work, not least, the Three Colours Trilogy as a whole. However, what really makes this film work, is the attention to narrative detail, story development and character depth... with Kieslowski and his co-writer Krzysztof Piesiewicz making sure that for every sublime image, or poetic moment of transcendence, the film still offers the viewer an emotionally engaging story, and characters we can believe in.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pure beauty 23 Feb 2002
By R. Fox
Format:DVD
I like French cinema. I like all things French, but I especially like French cinema. I won't admit to being an expert on it, however. But I will say that I do enjoy it, and I have seen a lot. And this is one of the best French films I have ever seen.
It's not because it's meant to be clever, it's not becaue it's got Irene Jacob in it. It's just because it's nice. That's all. You can tell that Kievslowsky really put his heart into it, and it works. There is a really strong if not really silly dynamic to the main characters' relationship. It's also very innocent as well. I love the judge's little home, and the way you can tell it's been his only refuge for a long time. When you see him in court to face up to his responibility for his... sinsitser actions, you can really get to grips with the changes that the two characters are causing in each others' lives.
The ending is also great, and especially great if you've seen the other two films. You will probably laugh out loud at the obsurdity of it. This is not a boring film if you prepare yourself for it, because a lot of French films rely on characters and plot rather than special effects - unlike Hollywood which relies on special effects rather than plot. I don't know whio it was, but someone once said of French cinema "We make little-budget films with huge stories, and Hollywood makes huge-budget films with little stories."
Oh, just watch it. It's great. I think you'd have to be thinking too hard to not like this film...
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Polish cinema
It is not a French cinema. Im sorry to hear.Trylogy, decalog etc are Polish great movies.
Kieslowski was one if the greatest directors. Read more
Published 1 month ago by katarzyna cichowska
5.0 out of 5 stars very engaging
don't think i'm intelligent enough to understand completely , but this was very thoughtful and beautiful film .
arrived promptly and in good condition
Published 6 months ago by shinny
5.0 out of 5 stars A 'must see' film
This study of the relationship between a young girl and an elderly man is quite outstanding, and brilliantly acted. After our first viewing we watched it again almost immediately. Read more
Published 10 months ago by Amethyst
5.0 out of 5 stars Cinema At Its Most Mesmerising And Brilliant
This culmination of Krzysztof Kieslowski's trilogy of films (loosely based around the French flag tricolor - here, fraternity) is, for me, the finest of the three and ranks as one... Read more
Published 12 months ago by Keith M
5.0 out of 5 stars good
making people write long reviews on ggod they receive is in my opinion expecting a lot. surely just a simple word comment is enough??
Published 14 months ago by Ms. Julie A. Renyard
5.0 out of 5 stars The girls and the dogs
Those who have seen all three films in Kieslowski`s famed trilogy will no doubt all have a favourite. Rouge/Red is mine. Read more
Published 23 months ago by GlynLuke
5.0 out of 5 stars Gorgeous
This film is gorgeous in every way. I cannot count how many times I've watched it. It is by far my favourite of the 3 colours. I highly recommend this film.
Published on 1 Aug 2011 by SunnysideWays Books
3.0 out of 5 stars Director ran out of steam
Trois Couleurs: Rouge
1994 French
This is the third of the three films by acclaimed Polish director Krzysztof Kieslowski in his abstract study of the vaunted values of... Read more
Published on 27 Feb 2011 by J. R. Moss
5.0 out of 5 stars The best film of the best trilogy ever made
Words simply fail me. The final chapter of Kieslowski's amazing trilogy is one of the most stunning films ever made, and I don't want to spoil it in any way. Just watch it. Read more
Published on 17 Jan 2010 by ffta34
5.0 out of 5 stars Not a great transfer
I have this (the Artificial Eye release). It's a bit thin and fuzzy and a little background research suggests that the R1 NTSC copy is a lot better, with stronger colour, contrast... Read more
Published on 11 Sep 2008 by N. C. Bateman
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