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  • Three Colours Collection - Blue, White, Red - Krzysztof Kieslowski
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Three Colours Collection - Blue, White, Red - Krzysztof Kieslowski


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Product details

  • Language: French
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: All Regions
  • Number of discs: 3
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0052BMZTG
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 211,946 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

45 of 49 people found the following review helpful By Budge Burgess on 28 Mar. 2005
Format: DVD
In his "Three Colours" trilogy, Kieslowski takes a handful of people whose destinies are irretrievably welded together as an expression of liberty, equality, and fraternity, and presents their lives and the decisions which have led them to come together.
The trilogy is a wonderful piece of art. Relating the three colours of the French flag to the mantra of the French Revolution (liberty, equality, fraternity), Kieslowski explores these virtues not as ideals or as morals to be evoked in each of the films, but as values which have largely been swept aside by modern consumerism and the pursuit of self-satisfaction and self-indulgence.
Kieslowski used a different cameraman for each film, used different thematic colours for each (different filters, different colours featuring heavily in each film ,etc.), and constructs three films which have radically different moods and feels to them. (Please see my individual reviews for greater detail.)
Juliette Binoche dominates "Blue", totally, in an acting tour de force which sweeps you off your seat. Zbigniew Zamachowski gives a witty performance in "White" (the weakest of the trilogy), with Julie Delpy playing a supporting role. And in "Red", the honours are shared between Irene Jacob and Jean-Louis Trentignant. Kieslowski can thus change the internal dynamics of the film to suit his needs - he nowhere relies on conventional male/female leads. Rather he deconstructs the relationships of his leading actors and uses these to emphasise the themes of each film.
It was a brave move to shoot all three films so quickly (they overlapped in shooting) and in pursuit of such a tight schedule.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By spaceodds on 23 Jun. 2014
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
What's there to say in regards to the Three Colours Trilogy that hasn't been said before. Over the last twenty odd years critics, film scholers and audiences have disected pretty much every shot of these three sensational films.

Despite its themes of liberty, equality, brotherhood & destiny; its the basic necessities of the films that should make a film worth watching, and fortunately the great, and sadly late, Krzysztof Kieślowski, has taken each film and given a hand crafted collage of cinematic beauty, and emotion.

Blue deals in tragedy and reaching a sense of liberty through the duldrums of said tragedy. Julliette Binoche plays Julie a survivor, who tries to mourn the death of her daughter and husband, and instead decides to breakaway from everything which she held dear from her married life and start afresh. It is only through the journey of her liberation and the discovery of facts from her previous life that finally allows her character to be free, and mourn. The film is both a visual and narrative treat, Slawomir Idziak's cinematography is lush with beauty that constantly refers to its title. The blue and dark filters is brilliantly used to convery the sense of Julie's character. Binoche gives a powerhouse performance, easily the best of her career. Her interactions with the world and her spontaneity drags the audience with her on her journey of liberation. A beautiful and thought provoking film and my own personal favourite of the trilogy.

White: My own personal second favourite doesn't have the compelling nature and power of its predecessor, but like all great 'sequels', if its a tad different, then its mostly always a treat, and while White is different than Blue, it is no less inferior, its simply different.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By DeclanCochran on 4 Mar. 2014
Format: DVD
There aren't many films out there that can claim to be genuinely life-changing, but these films, I would argue, have earned that right. Made around the three French ideals; liberty, equality, fraternity, they are the pinnacle of film-making, a distinguished and mature work that form a cohesive and coherent whole, or can simply be enjoyed separately.

Three Colours Blue: my personal favourite of the trio, this is a film that sucks you in from the very first frame, and has such a high command of the core aspects of film-making (the unity of space, action and music, for example) that it makes all other films seem dull by comparison for several days afterwards. It tells a simple story; Julie Vignon is in a car with her young child and husband, who is a famous composer, and then the car crashes. The child and husband die. Julie is at first sad, and then we don't know how she is, and then we follow her for the rest of the film as, presumably, she doesn't know how she is either. This is where the theme of "liberty" comes in, as we learn slowly that she is trying to "free" herself from the shackles of the past through abandoning her old life. That's my take on it anyway, and even Kieslowski would admit that it is probably not that simple. Nevertheless, the film remains a singularly devastating and beautifully luminous experience that has images and sequences that are simply unforgettable.

Three Colours White: the underdog of the trilogy, and the least lauded, I retain a soft-spot for this film because it takes a potentially un-watchable scenario (that an impotent man's wife suddenly abandons him, has his shop burnt down by said wife, and then has to smuggle himself back to his native Poland and tells it with a dry, cynical humour that ends up carrying the film.
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