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Three Colours: Blue [DVD] [1993]


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Three Colours: Blue [DVD] [1993] + Three Colours: White [DVD] [1994] + Three Colours: Red [DVD] [1994]
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Product details

  • Actors: Juliette Binoche, Zbigniew Zamachowski, Julie Delpy, Benoît Régent, Florence Pernel
  • Directors: Krzysztof Kieslowski
  • Writers: Slawomir Idziak, Krzysztof Kieslowski, Agnieszka Holland, Edward Zebrowski, Krzysztof Piesiewicz
  • Producers: Marin Karmitz
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: French
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.77:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Artificial Eye
  • DVD Release Date: 29 Oct. 2001
  • Run Time: 94 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (41 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00005QG0I
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 13,883 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

DVD Special Features:

Krzysztof Kieslowski Masterclass (this is about 10 minutes worth of archive footage of the director talking about how he filmed 'Blue')
Interview with Juliette Binoche
Interview with Jacques Witta (editor)
Interview with Marin Karmitz (producer)
Theatrical trailer
Extracts from the original soundtrack composed by Zbigniew Preisner
Dolby Digital 5.1
French with English subtitles
16:9 anamorphic picture

From Amazon.co.uk

The first instalment of the late Polish director Krzysztof Kieslowski's trilogy on Liberty, Equality and Fraternity, the three colours of the French flag. Blue is the most sombre of the three, a movie dominated by feelings of grief. As the film begins, a car accident claims the life of a well-known composer. His wife, played by Juliette Binoche (Oscar winner for The English Patient), does not so much put the pieces of her life back together as start an entirely new existence. She moves to Paris, where she dissolves into a wordless life virtually without other people. Kieslowski attaches an almost subconscious significance to the colour blue but primarily he focuses on Binoche's luminous face and the way her subtle shifts in emotion flicker and disappear. The picture may be more enigmatic than the follow-ups White and Red but Binoche's quiet, heartbreaking presence becomes spellbinding; her performance won the best actress prize at the Venice Film Festival in 1993. --Robert Horton --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

47 of 49 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 22 Feb. 2002
Format: DVD
Don't let the last review put you off. If you're looking at this film, you won't be expecting car chases and machine guns ... These three films, of which Blue if the first, offer a perfect example of what European film makers do so well and Hollywood does so badly, spellbindingly slow studies of character and situation that draw you in, that you need to relax into like a hot bath. If you agree that films can be an artform and not pure entertainment, you don't faint at the thought of subtitles and you don't need an explosion every five minutes to keep you concentrating, give these a try.
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38 of 40 people found the following review helpful By EA Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 7 Mar. 2006
Format: DVD
Blue is the color of sadness and depression. And "Blue" ("Bleu") is the first film in the celebrated Colors trilogy by Krzysztof Kieslowski. Accompanying the rich "Red" ("Rouge") and sharp "White" ("Blanc"), this is a beautiful and haunting look at grief and getting past it.
Julie de Courcy (Juliette Binoche) and her family are in a car accident when their brakes fail. Julie is injured, but her composer husband and their daughter die. She can't bring herself to commit suicide, but neither can she just go home and get over it. So instead she leaves her palatial house in the country after a night with her husband's old friend Olivier (Benoît Régent), who has been in love with her for years.
Julie arrives in Paris with nothing but a blue cut-glass lampshade, takes back her maiden name, rents an apartment, and tries to leave her old life behind. Though she says she doesn't want love or friends (because they are "traps"), she befriends a promiscuous young woman and is pulled back to Olivier when he starts to finish her husband's unfinished work. In turn, Olivier reveals to her the side of her husband she never knew -- the other woman he loved.
The Colors trilogy is based on the colors of the French flag: Blue, white and red, standing respectively for liberty, equality, and fraternity. In this, Julie is unconsciously seeking liberty from her past life and her grief. This grief is shown beyond mere tears and unhappiness. She rakes her knuckles over a rough wall, rips off a strand off the hanging lampshade, as little ways of showing her inner turmoil. At the same time, the revelations about Julie's husband raises questions about their marriage and about Julie herself.
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27 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Prufrock on 3 Feb. 2002
Format: VHS Tape
When I first saw Kieslowski's TV version of 'A short film about Love' I was amazed by his compassion for every single character in his work. It's the basic humanity of his films that always make me come back to them.
Blue is in essence a very simple tale - a woman loses her husband and daughter and finds it almost impossible to cope. To do so she cuts herself off from the world around her - her liberty/freedom is complete. The question is - is liberty enough? Can any human live fully without the contact of others? During one scene in the film Binoche pays a visit on her mother. In the background a television shows a high wire act. If the man slips, no one will catch him. Kieslowski seems to be saying 'you can be alone, but no one can save you then'.
There is a great deal more to all of his films than can be absorbed in a single viewing. Watch the movie for the outstanding performances by Binoche and Charlotte Very as her neighbour Lucille and the beautifully combination of Idziak's probing, luminescent cinematography and Zbigniew Preisner's searching music. As ever with Kieslowski,less is more, silence speaks volumes and you are,in the end,never alone.
Utterly compelling.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 28 Jun. 2001
Format: VHS Tape
It is a pleasure for me to be able to write a review of this film. Its beautiful, haunting music impressed me so much that I have since bought, not only the soundtrack, but more CDs of Preisner's music, and I have seen all the films which comprise the trilogy, plus "The Double Life of Veronique" (same director, same composer). I only wish that they could have made more films together. The circumstances, although tragic, result in a courage and determination which is inspiring, and which give answers to the perennial questions as to whether one should continue to attempt to communicate with people, or to withdraw completely, especially after a tragedy, when one is very vulnerable. It's a story of love, of faith and of courage.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By GlynLuke TOP 100 REVIEWER on 17 May 2012
Format: DVD
My apologies to CS Lewis for my review title, but it perfectly describes this remorseless portrait of a woman`s inconsolable sorrow on the sudden death of her husband and daughter in a car crash.
In his magisterial `Dictionary of Film` David Thomson gives the late Kieslowski pretty short shrift, accusing him of making films that come across as humourless, with a too often "sanctimonious tidiness". While I can see his point, and to some extent sympathise with it, there are other directors - Tarkovsky, for example - at whom such charges might be more jusifiably levelled. It is true that at times the director seems to be standing outside his film, dispassionately dissecting with forensic serenity the neat, nearly tearless grief so admirably portrayed by the young Juliette Binoche in one of her earlier roles - one which must have been important to her both personally and professionally. Her comments, in one of the Extras included in this DVD release, are highly illuminating, giving an intelligent view of the film-making process as well as her relationship with director and cameraman.
This first film in Kieslowski`s valedictory trilogy manages to be intensely moving despite, or more likely because of, its discreet, observational tone. Binoche has always been a soulful actress who nevertheless is recognisably human - by which I mean that not a few French actors, in particular, can appear robotic, indeed humourless, if given a part that requires them to be passive or unemotional, a trap the otherwise splendid Isabelle Huppert falls into at times, to give one example.
Blue is not without a certain hesitant humour, thanks to Binoche`s inherent playfulness, which surfaces amid all the heaviness of grief.
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