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Three Blind Mice (St. Martin's Minotaur Mysteries) [Mass Market Paperback]

Agatha Christie
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

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Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Minotaur Books; Reissue edition (14 Oct 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312979762
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312979768
  • Product Dimensions: 17.2 x 10.6 x 2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 984,959 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Born in Torquay in 1890, Agatha Christie began writing during the First World War and wrote over 100 novels, plays and short story collections. She was still writing to great acclaim until her death, and her books have now sold over a billion copies in English and another billion in over 100 foreign languages. Yet Agatha Christie was always a very private person, and though Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple became household names, the Queen of Crime was a complete enigma to all but her closest friends.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
18 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Agatha Chirstie does nothing by halves 31 May 1998
By A Customer
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I am a fourteen year old fan from Malaysia. I graduated from the 'Secret Seven' to 'Nancy Drew' over a few years, and when I became bored with and outgrew Carolyn Keene's novels, my mother suggested reading Agathe Christie. (Agatha who? I asked, and I had thought only 'old fogies' read Agatha Christie). Was i wrong! I read the 'Mousetrap' (recently renamed 'Three Blind Mice') once and i loved it. I recommend it to almost everyone I know. i think that anyone above the age of twleve can read it. (this is nothing compared to the violence on tv nowadays. trust me on this.) It provides nonstop suspense, excitement, and even some homour. The characters are warm and vividly described. What more can be said? Buy only a copy, and i'm sure you won't have enough to go around the house! And if you can, watch the play at St. Thomas theatre in London. I begged my mother to take me to it and it was just as good, if not better, than the story. If you need an introduction the queen of detective fiction, read 'Three blind mice nad other stories'. You'll be enthralled by the magnifient author, who has the famous ability of doing nothing by halves.
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5.0 out of 5 stars mousetrap 30 Jan 2014
Format:Mass Market Paperback|Verified Purchase
if you have seen the mousetrap in london read this it is just a clever. clever story as A C as always
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1.0 out of 5 stars Bad, but good responce 8 Jan 2014
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This item was not as described but the quick response from Amazon was great. They refunded my money and I was able to keep the book as well. I read it then put it in the recycle bin. So can't complain.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A must for Christie fans 4 Dec 2012
By downkiddie TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
The main attraction of this book is of course the title story, "Three Blind Mice", which has never been published in book form in the UK, the only Christie story to hold this dubious honour. This is due to the ongoing success of the play which developed from it, "The Mousetrap". So it is rather a spoiler if you're heading out to see the play, but a wonderful Christie tale nonetheless.

The remainder of the book contains stories which can be found in a range of other short story collections. Featuring Hercule Poirot, Miss Marple and Mr Satterthwaite and Mr Quin, a good range of Christie writing is here. It's a good selection of ingenious writing, making it overall one of the best selection of short stories by Agatha Christie available. Fortunately it's now very easy to get his American book easily and cheaply in the UK. Highly recommended (after you've seen the play!).
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Amazon.com: 4.4 out of 5 stars  15 reviews
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Agatha Chirstie does nothing by halves 31 May 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I am a fourteen year old fan from Malaysia. I graduated from the 'Secret Seven' to 'Nancy Drew' over a few years, and when I became bored with and outgrew Carolyn Keene's novels, my mother suggested reading Agathe Christie. (Agatha who? I asked, and I had thought only 'old fogies' read Agatha Christie). Was i wrong! I read the 'Mousetrap' (recently renamed 'Three Blind Mice') once and i loved it. I recommend it to almost everyone I know. i think that anyone above the age of twleve can read it. (this is nothing compared to the violence on tv nowadays. trust me on this.) It provides nonstop suspense, excitement, and even some homour. The characters are warm and vividly described. What more can be said? Buy only a copy, and i'm sure you won't have enough to go around the house! And if you can, watch the play at St. Thomas theatre in London. I begged my mother to take me to it and it was just as good, if not better, than the story. If you need an introduction the queen of detective fiction, read 'Three blind mice nad other stories'. You'll be enthralled by the magnifient author, who has the famous ability of doing nothing by halves.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 4 Marple, 3 Poirot, 1 Satterthwaite, and The Mousetrap 1 Dec 2002
By Michele L. Worley - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
These short stories all appear under their original titles (alternate titles are noted). If you're interested in Joan Hickson's unabridged narration of the 4 Jane Marple stories herein, see the recording MISS MARPLE INVESTIGATES. They are among the few Marple short stories that don't appear in THE THIRTEEN PROBLEMS collection. Two of the Poirot cases, on the other hand, appear in HERCULE POIROT'S EARLY CASES, while the third appears in THE ADVENTURE OF THE CHRISTMAS PUDDING collection.

"Three Blind Mice" - None of Christie's regular characters appear; this tale corresponds to the play 'The Mousetrap'. Once upon a time, in 1940, three young children were evacuated and sent to live at Longridge Farm. The Greggs treated them barbarously, and after one boy died, Mr. Gregg was killed escaping from the police, and Mrs. Gregg went to prison. Now Mrs. Gregg has been murdered just after her release from prison, and the next target appears to be a young woman at Monkswell Manor - but the murderer could be either the boy or the girl (now grown up), the Davises don't know the background of any of their paying guests - and they're snowed in.

"Strange Jest" - Miss Marple has a missing will problem - except that in this case, the assets rather than the will itself are hidden. The stories I can think of with this theme are all of the form: wealthy uncle decides to amuse himself at his heirs' expense, and hides their inheritance. (Sayers' "The Fascinating Problem of Uncle Meleager's Will" from LORD PETER VIEWS THE BODY is a stronger story than "Strange Jest" - the uncle not only had a purpose in hiding the will, but a wicked sense of humor.)

"Tape-Measure Murder" and "The Case of the Perfect Maid", like most Marple short stories (and unlike the novels) are set in St. Mary Mead. In the first case, mild Mr. Spenlow is suspected by the village of murdering his wife, whose body was discovered by a dressmaker coming in for a fitting. In the second, Miss Marple is asked to intercede with the Skinner sisters when they fire their maid, Gladys, with an implication of theft. The slur on her character is compounded when the Skinners bring in an outsider who appears to be a paragon - too good to be true. (As a bonus, the village eagerly awaits Dr. Haydock's first professional encounter with the hypochondriac Miss Emily, and he comes up to scratch.)

To speed Miss Marple's recovery from a serious illness, Dr. Haydock writes up "The Case of the Caretaker" as a story-within-a-story for Miss Marple to get her teeth into. The end of Haydock's manuscript is an implied 'Challenge to the Reader', since at that point one has all the information needed to solve the puzzle; most of the stories of the Marple collection THE THIRTEEN PROBLEMS share this feature, although the other 3 Marple stories in this collection do not.

"The Third-Floor Flat" When Patricia Garnett finds herself locked out of her 4th floor flat after a double date, one of the young men climbs up the coal lift ("Pat *never* locks and bolts things"), but gets out on the wrong floor - and discovers the body of Pat's downstairs neighbour. Poirot, her upstairs neighbour, offers his help after being roused by the commotion.

"The Adventure of Johnnie Waverly" (a.k.a. "At the Stroke of Twelve") The only Poirot story in this collection narrated by Hastings. Why did the kidnapper send threatening notes to the Waverlys *before* snatching their little boy?

"Four-and-Twenty Blackbirds", a.k.a. "Poirot and the Regular Customer" - Listening to this one read by David Suchet may make you hungry; be warned. A friend of Poirot's has taken him to the Gallant Endeavour, a picturesque restaurant with very reliable cooking. The friend points out an elderly fellow diner who appears twice a week like clockwork and has very predictable eating habits, so the staff knows him, although they don't know his name, business, or anything else about him. Molly, the waitress, adds that he came in on *Monday* the previous week, and ordered stuff he ordinarily couldn't abide - she worried that she'd forgotten what day of the week it was! Poirot feels uneasy - later he felt that he should have forseen what was coming, and prevented it. :)

"The Love Detectives", a.k.a. "At the Crossroads" (30 October 1926) - One of the few Quin & Satterthwaite stories that doesn't appear in THE MYSTERIOUS MR. QUIN. Satterthwaite, staying with an old friend who happens to be chief constable, is carried along to a murder investigation. After finding out about the blunt instrument and the body in the library, you may start taking a hard look at the butler, but the investigators are themselves aware of the cliche, so don't be suckered on appearances.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Three Blind Mice 19 Nov 2004
By Hammie - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
This book, full of mysteries, would be great for those who enjoy page-turners. Out of five stars I would rate this book a four, because, it really kept me intrigued. I also liked how there is always a twist to things; even if someone seems like they fit the profile for the criminal, there is always another possibility.

The first (and main,) story, Three Blind Mice, all starts when a blinding snow storm hits, trapping Molly and her husband in their newly started guesthouse with the four occupants of the rooms, stranded. With a homicidal maniac on the loose, its only a matter of time before the maniac is revealed...

The other eight stories are all thrillers, full of clever criminals, and sneaky crimes. Some of the titles include "Tape Measure Murder" and, "The Case of the Perfect Maid." Miss Marple, an elderly woman, has deep explanations for almost every problem that occurs in her "peaceful" town of St. Mary Mead. Hercule Poirot; the other detective; gets down to the point with ease and confidence.

I enjoyed the tension and suspense in this book. While being short, the stories still gave enough context behind the characters, so that you still feel like you get to know them. I liked how these stories really cut to the chase, in that there wasn't anything in the story that didn't serve a purpose; no unnecessary parts as there sometimes is in other stories.

Over all, I would definitely recommend this book to all. It keeps you on the edge of your seat. Not once did I grow bored of this book. Three Blind Mice is full of brilliant disguises, clever plans, rich explanations, great dialogue, and overall delight.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Thoroughly Delightful and Unique Short Story Collection 20 Feb 2003
By Meredith Burton - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
"Three Blind Mice and Other Stories," by the absolutely outstanding "Queen of Crime" Agatha Christie, is an absolute gem of a book! All of the nine stories in this collection shed light on Christie's gift of creating unforgettable characters and spine-tinglingly suspenseful plots. I particularly enjoyed reading "Three Blind Mice," (the novella of the collection) because I had recently seen a high school production of "The Mousetrap," the play that Christie wrote after the novella was so successful. I enjoyed comparing the two, because both verstions, though similar have many differences. This novella does not feature any of Christie's series detectives, (Hercule Poirot, or Jane Marple,) but is is outstandingly brilliant in introducing characters that will stay with you long after the book is completed. I'll say one thing, I'll never look at the nursery rhyme "Three Blind Mice" the same way again! Readers are treated to four delightful stories featuring Miss. Marple, ("Tape Measure Murder," "The Case of the Perfect Maid," "The Case of the Caretaker," and "Strange Jest.") The are treated to three stories featuring Hercule Poirot, "The Third Floor Flat," The Adventure of Johnny Waverley," and (my personal favorite,) "Four and Twenty Blackbirds," in which Poirot examines the eating habits of a certain individual in order to solve a murder. There is also a special treat of a story featuring Mr. Harley Quin called "The Love Detectives." All in all, a wonderful feast of humor, mystery, and suspense, which I'm sure will be enjoyed by people for many years to come. Happy reading to you all, and take care!!
9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Of More Interest to Established Fans than Newcomers 25 May 2003
By Gary F. Taylor - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Unlike the superior short story collection TUESDAY CLUB MURDERS, which unifies its stories via various stylistic devices and a single detective (Miss Marple), THREE BLIND MICE AND OTHER STORIES presents a mixed bag in terms of both quality and leading characters. And simply stated, although many of the stories here have their charms, most of the titles here are not among the best of her short fiction. The collection does contain three stories that offer Christie at her stylistic and plot-twisting best: "The Case of the Perfect Maid," featuring Jane Marple, and "Third Floor Flat" and "The Adventure of Johnnie Waverly," both featuring Hercule Poirot. Indeed, the first of the three is as fine as anything Christie ever wrote in any form, a cleverly crafted tale of a maid unjustly accused of theft that Christie expertly guides through a number of unexpected turns to a completely unexpected conclusion. But such titles as "Strange Jest," "Tape-Measure Murder," "The Case of the Caretaker," "Four and Twenty Blackbirds," and "The Love Detectives" are utterly transparent at worst, minor works at best.

The centerpiece of the collection, of course, is "Three Blind Mice." This rather long story--more of a novella than a short--caused quite a stir among mystery readers when it debuted, and it would go on to considerably greater fame when Christie adapted it to the stage as THE MOUSETRAP, which has the distinction of being the single longest running play in theatrical history. But whatever its merits on the stage, and in spite of one of Christie's more startling plot turns, the style of the piece is decidedly melodramatic, artificial, and now and then down right clunky. This is a collection more likely to appeal to determined Christie fans, particularly those who are interested in tracing out Christie's unique ability to reconstruct the plots of her minor short stories into considerably more successful full-length works. While the stories here are certainly readable (and considerably more interesting than the short fiction of such Christie contemporaries as Dorothy Sayers, whose style was less at home in short story format), this is not a collection I would greatly recommend to new fans. Such readers would do better to select THE TUESDAY CLUB MURDERS.

--GFT (Amazon Reviewer)--
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