£19.95 + £2.80 delivery
In stock. Sold by dyerwilliams
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: VHS
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • A Thousand Acres [VHS] [1998]
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

A Thousand Acres [VHS] [1998]

16 customer reviews

Price: £19.95
Only 1 left in stock.
Dispatched from and sold by dyerwilliams.
2 new from £14.99 3 used from £3.50
£19.95 Only 1 left in stock. Dispatched from and sold by dyerwilliams.

Product details

  • Actors: Michelle Pfeiffer, Jessica Lange, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Jason Robards, Colin Firth
  • Directors: Jocelyn Moorhouse
  • Writers: Jane Smiley, Laura Jones
  • Producers: Armyan Bernstein, Diana Pokorny, Kate Guinzburg, Lynn Arost, Marc Abraham
  • Language: German
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: 4 Front
  • VHS Release Date: 5 Feb. 2001
  • Run Time: 101 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00004R745
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 272,406 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Product Description

When retiring Iowa farmer Larry Cook announces that he wishes to split his land between his three daughters, the eldest - Ginny (Jessica Lange) and Rose (Michelle Pfeiffer) reluctantly agree. However, Caroline (Jennifer Jason Leigh) disagrees, and is disowned by Larry as a result. The decision sparks off a tragic family feud: Larry soon falls out with Ginny, who has begun an affair with a local boy, and Rose, but loses a court battle to regain control of his farm.

From Amazon.co.uk

Jessica Lange and Michelle Pfeiffer are quietly dazzling in this underrated adaptation of Jane Smiley's best-selling modern version of King Lear. The two play sisters of a stubborn, alcoholic Iowa farmer (Jason Robards), who decides to leave his fertile farm to them and their youngest sister (Jennifer Jason Leigh). It is a decision that rends the family, setting siblings against one another and forcing long-held secrets out of their guilty closets. The family dynamics become ever more destructive, and the refuge of sanity the two older sisters have created may be their only salvation. It's a tragedy not quite on a Shakespearean scale, but anyone who appreciates the difficulties of a dysfunctional family will relate to the heartbreak--and the promise of redemption. Pfeiffer especially is breathtaking as the good housewife Rose, whose rage at her father and her husband is never far from her placid surface. --Anne Hurley --This text refers to the DVD edition.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Eddie Nguyen on 9 Jan. 2010
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
A Thousand Acres [DVD] [1997]

Geesh, what a flick!. This is such a powerful story about a down to earth farming family in the American midwest when the balance of power shifts...with earthy disclosures.

Jason Robards is wonderful as is Michelle Pheiffer & Jessica Lange.

Anyone who enjoys good drama with a natural simply told story will certainly want to pick up this flick. It is a dvd that you will want to see again & again.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
22 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Dennis Littrell TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 24 Aug. 2007
Format: DVD
One of the Message Boards threads at IMDb had two women talking about Colin Firth, how they watched the movie only because of him. Obviously these were two young women; but what struck me is how little this movie has been appreciated by audiences generally. The brilliant, and I mean brilliant, performances by Michelle Pfeiffer and Jessica Lange were hardly noticed, not only by audiences, but by the Academy and by most of the critics.

I think I know why. First, the plot--or actually just the setup--is a kind of bastardization of Shakespeare's King Lear with the dying, crazy patriarch and the three scheming daughters who will inherit. Their names even begin with the same letters, Regan, Goneril, and Cordelia--Rose, Ginny, and Caroline. And I guess "Larry" (Jason Robards) works for "Lear." The apparent idea envisioned by Jane Smiley in her Pulitzer Prize winning novel was to tell a Lear-like story from the point of view of the daughters, and to tell it in a sort of late twentieth century realistic way not considered by the Bard. The problem is, in Smiley and Moorhouse's story, the two older daughters are very human with strengths and weaknesses while the father is a most despicable character without much in the way of redeeming qualities. His only strength is his ability to make a financial success of the farm; however, we can even discount that since his father and grandfather before him built the farm and he inherited it.

The second problem--and this is one I cannot personally attest to, not having read Smiley's novel--is that the movie is only a limited and partial interpretation of that novel. Still, it is almost always the case that an excellent novel, especially a long and ambitious one with many psychological nuances, cannot be faithfully transferred to the screen.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Peter E. on 28 Nov. 2009
Format: DVD
We first saw this film on German television and it was so good we decided to buy the DVD. Some really great acting by Jessica Lange, Michelle Pfeiffer and Jason Robards as well as most of the other cast members.
This film is down to earth reality and if you have not watched it you are definitely missing out on some great entertainment. For the price an absolute gift!!!!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By ScottPaul ScottPaul on 17 Jan. 2014
Format: DVD
For her second major US film, Australian director Jocelyn Moorhouse, wife and producer of 'Muriel's Wedding's P.J Hogan, took Jane Smiley's same-titled Pulitzer winning novel, and with New Zealander screen writer Laura Jones, set this modern-day King Lear among the golden cornfields and hazy backdrops of a Midwestern farming community, where an old past-it farmer decides on a whim to divide his land equally between his three daughters. Despite an astoundingly misguided critical savaging on its released (despite it being one of the best films of 1997-the very opposite of what old recently deceased movie critic Roger Ebert), this searing drama is the pick of the crops when it comes to that rare thing in Hollywood-a leading movie where the three main stars are all woman, and three of the finest actresses of their own specific generation, no less, in Jessica Lange, Michelle Pfeiffer and Jennifer Jason Leigh all emerging as physically plausible siblings, lending their considerable weight and class to a worthy piece that keeps its corn specifically in the fields where it should be, and while a generally soft-focused film to start with, it gets progressively darker as long suppressed demons and antagonisms begin to billow and finally explode but do in so the correct context of a ebbing river, and not the Paul Thomas Anderson approach of mass hysteria, unending screaming and hugely irritating repetition.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 21 people found the following review helpful By cre8ion@hotmail.com on 19 Nov. 2000
Format: VHS Tape
3 daughters, 1000 acres and their well-respected but tyrannical father. Larry Cook (Jason Robards) plays the bad-tempered, proud and recently retired father whom other farmers consult in regards to decisions about their farm. The discord begins when Larry publicly announces his decision to divide the 1000acres into 3 equal shares, Virginia/Ginny (Jessica Lange), Rose (Michelle Pfeiffer) and Caroline (Jennifer Jason Leigh). This gift is wavered by the youngest, Caroline, in order to think carefully into this and Larry's pride is injured. Father and daughter becomes estranged and Larry divides the farm into 2 portions but with time feels that Ginny and Rose and their families have forgotten about him and are preoccupied with having their own fun - due in part to the return of the prodigal son of a neighbour, Jess (Colin Firth) whom the girls haven't seen for a long time. Larry begins drink-driving and Ginny confiscates the keys to his truck for his own safety. This leads to the confrontation of accusations and threats between father and both daughters, which opens up honest admissions between Rose and Ginny about the lives of the Cook family. Ties and loyalties jump as Larry and Caroline take out a court order against her sisters over the management of the farm. The people in Pike feel Ginny and Rose have treated their father in an unacceptable manner. Ty (Keith Carradine) , Ginny's husband, takes Caroline's side and sisters are pitted against each other, as is father against daughters. The story is part-narrated by Ginny, the oldest. Loyal and optimistic. Being "oblivious" is how she copes with life but she is the anchor that holds the entire family together. Ty is equally nice as her husband who thinks and acts for the best of the farm.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback