12.95 + 1.26 shipping
In stock. Sold by EliteDigital UK
Add to Basket
or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.

Other Sellers on Amazon
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Available to Download Now
Buy the MP3 album for £7.99

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available

Thought For Food Import


Price: 12.95
Only 1 left in stock.
Dispatched from and sold by EliteDigital UK.
8 used from 2.40

Amazon's Books Store

Music

Image of album by Books

Photos

Image of Books

Biography

The Books was formed in New York City in 1999 by two neighbors who collaborated on what they considered pop music. In fact, Nick Zammuto and Paul de Jong - perhaps by a mix of accident and design - developed a sound that over a decade later still defies categorization and mystifies critics and fans alike. Their music has been called many things: surreal, playful, transcendent, innovative, ... Read more in Amazon's Books Store

Visit Amazon's Books Store
for 4 albums, 5 photos, discussions, and more.

Frequently Bought Together

Thought For Food + The Lemon of Pink + The Way Out
Price For All Three: 36.22

These items are dispatched from and sold by different sellers.

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product details

  • Audio CD (27 Dec 2004)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Tomlab
  • ASIN: B00006C2C2
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 248,793 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By thecabinetscom on 24 Mar 2003
Format: Audio CD
For those of you who don't know much about the books, they are basically two guys, one who plays folky acoustic guitar, and the other who does samples. It sounds like an odd combination, but it works really well, I'm not really into folk, so don't let that description put you off, but I don't know how else to describe it. It is a very difficult album to describe, but in some ways that makes it better - it is just a superbly innovative album. Many of the samples they use come from films and include strange dialougue and speech. The songs have good beats too, shifting, stop-start kind of beats, and everything pulls together brilliantly. This all makes for a fantastically interesting and incredibly orginal and innovative sound. I would recommend it to anyone who is interested in music as an art form.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 4 Aug 2005
Format: Audio CD
I first heard this band during a Brian Eno interview a few weeks ago, on the strength of that I got this album, and since first hearing that they've become my favourite band. I can't quite pin it down, but somehow this CD restores my faith in music, nay life! It reminds me of going for stoned nightwalks with my brother, of getting excited about hearing amazing new music on the John Peel show in the 80's, of the evocative power of found sound. There's a great warmth to this recording, and a wonderful sense of humour. And though it may seem chaotic at times, compositionally it has a wonderful organic flow - I read somewhere one of the guys describe the way the tracks are structured as somewhat akin to a jellyfish - in that if you look at a jellyfish it seems like it can't possibly "work" - but somehow it does - and beautifully so.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Demob Happy on 24 Aug 2007
Format: Audio CD
Somewhat overhyped, the release of 'Thought for Food' brought such gushing press reaction that it certainly seemed worth the gamble. A low-key blend of manipulated found sound (people laughing, gates squeaking shut, sampled voices), cut 'n' spliced acoustic guitar, banjo and violin, and smatterings of murmured singing - it all looks very nice on paper. However, it is either jarringly erratic - downing one enjoyable motif to take an unwelcome sojourn on the banjo - or wholly insubstantial, with songs either going nowhere or plodding into nothingness.

The use of found sound and spectral, disembodied voices in not unusual, but there is something strangely quirky and calming about this album that can lay claim to authenticity. One track rustles and floats with sampled laughter, and brings a smile to the listener's face, while 'Read, Eat, Sleep' lulls you sleep with its samples from a spelling bee competition. Like Animal Collective's later Sung Tongs, it has a charmingly playful rusticity, but unlike that band The Books never build on their successes, having a tendency to allow things to deconstruct or implode. 'Enjoy Your Worries, You May Never Have Them Again' opens brilliantly with its looped guitar plucks and deranged voices but, just when it hits a peak, makes an unwelcome detour down a country road (an annoying tangent of banjo and violin that throws the track completely off course). Thought for Food has much in common with folktronica (see Four Tet) but somehow doesn't belong to that genre, sharing its atmosphere even with some of Mogwai's quieter acoustic moments on 'Come on Die Young'. All space and texture, it is charming and jarring by turns.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Demob Happy on 23 Feb 2005
Format: Audio CD
One of the most strangely overrated albums of recent memory, the release of Food for Thought brought such gushing press reaction that it certainly seemed worth the gamble. A low-key blend of manipulated found sound (people laughing, gates squeaking shut, sampled voices), cut 'n' spliced acoustic guitar, banjo and violin, and smatterings of murmured singing - it all looks very nice on paper. However, it is either jarringly erratic - downing one enjoyable motif to take an unwelcome sojourn on the banjo - or wholly insubstantial, with songs either going nowhere or plodding into nothingness. The use of found sound and spectral, disembodied voices in not unusual, but there is something strangely quirky and calming about this album that can lay claim to authenticity. One track rustles and floats with sampled laughter, and brings a smile to the listener's face, while 'Read, Eat, Sleep' lulls you sleep with its samples from a spelling bee competition. Like Animal Collective's later Sung Tongs, it has a charmingly playful rusticity, but unlike that band The Books never build on their successes, having a tendency to allow things to deconstruct or implode. 'Enjoy Your Worries, You May Never Have Them Again' opens brilliantly with its looped guitar plucks and deranged voices but, just when it hits a peak, makes an unwelcome detour down a country road (an annoying tangent of banjo and violin that throws the track completely off course). Food for Thought could also be compared to some to the folktronic artists (see Four Tet) but somehow doesn't belong to that 'genre', sharing its atmosphere even with some of Mogwai's quieter acoustic moments on 'Come on Die Young'.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 20 reviews
47 of 50 people found the following review helpful
he kept calling me at night, all hours of the night... 25 Dec 2002
By Ryan Hennessy - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Rare. Innovative. Mind-expanding? Smart. Exciting. Meditative. If I had to choose a bunch of All Music Guide adjectives to sum up this album, those would be them. The Books' Thought For Food is a hard album to pin down as it's electronic, and yet feels more like folk than IDM. Maybe this is what Momus was talking about? Probably not, since he was talking about folk musicians starting out with synths and making their music with those instruments as a starting point. The Books are more complicated than a simple metaphor or equation can explain.
So I'll start by saying that The Books are two men: Nick Zammuto and Paul de Jong. According to a dead-on review of the record by Mark Richardson, there are four main instruments on the album: Guitar, violin, samples, and silence. Sometimes a guitar and cello will make up a bed for the samples, sometimes vice-versa. Each song is its own unique world. But throughout the whole of it, what really makes the album stunning, is the samples. Each is allowed to breath. Nothing on the album feels muddled. If Negativland is the beer, The Books are the wine. This is sampladelic music refined.
On the first track, perhaps my favorite song of the year, "Enjoy Your Worries, You May Never Have Them Again," there is a constantly shifting beat, as samples each struggle to get to the front. There is a contemplative and dramatic guitar line that makes its way throughout, but the clicks, glicks and beats will start and stop at a moments notice while samples of tennis matches, army generals, and a woman I recognized as "Hazel" from the NPR show Lost and Found Sound each jostle for attention but are cut off before they can say anything. It's just an impossibly profound song that doesn't come out and directly say anything. Immediately, you know The Books are up to something. The second track deals more with silence than the first, which is pretty packed. An acoustic guitar is strummed over and over to get that thick satisfying bassy sound going, and samples taken from the National Spelling Bee. A kid this time spells out the name of the song, "Read Eat Sleep," and you can audibly hear the silence and shuffling of paper that goes on when the kids are on stage standing there thinking.
"All Our Base Are Belong To Them" is a more conventional song with lots of chunky acoustic guitar that all but overwhelms the vocals. And if you pay attention you can hear Zammuto's family having a conversation during Thanksgiving, and somebody announces they're having a baby, and the family cheers and laughs. The whole album is great, but there's moments like that that really catch your attention and seem perfect and joyous. There's the moment in "Getting The Done Job" when a slow plodding glitched-up guitar suddenly jumps to life as a banjo and fiddle! Or how about when Hazel is talking over some squeekiness and the beat comes right back to where it was to interrupt her? Then there's the fuzzed-out drum beats that slap the guitar upside the head throughout "All Bad Ends All." Who ever thought that a twee sampladelic folk album could be life-affirming? Sadly, the album seems to have no sense of when it isn't welcome anymore and ends well before I wanted it to on a song that hardly works as a fitting last song for an album this magical.
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
"Welcome to the human race... you're a mess" 6 Dec 2002
By Mike Henderson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Innovative. That's a word I haven't heard very often referring to new releases this year. I always love albums that are difficult to explain to someone that's never heard it, especially if that person listens to as much stuff as you do, giving you a wide selection for points of reference to choose from, yet still coming up short in your attempt at an accurate description. Collectively known as the Books, the duo of Paul de Jong (from New York) and Nick Zammuto (from North Carolina) have produced an album that contains some pretty off-the-wall sound samples, disturbing dialogue, and even some old-fashioned singing (huh?). All this takes place over the top of some type of music, usually very simplistic in nature, such as an acoustic guitar and a violin. While odd voice samples are nothing new, you've never heard them employed in such a way as found here. This doesn't come off completely flawless, however. Thought For Food feels a little rough around the edges. On some tracks, everything comes together beautifully. In other tracks, they slightly miss their mark. When you've got something that sounds as fresh as this, why nitpick?
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
A-OK 17 Jan 2005
By jasonnn - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
It is only appropriate to start out this review with my first experience with The Books since everyone will probably remember theirs as well. After a long, or not so long [its irrelevant] day my two friends and I decided it was time for a little cool down. We went into my friend's room while she turned out all the lights and left only the TV muted on static to light the room. Then she turned on this album and we all lay there and listened. I had heard The Books before but this, for some reason, felt like the first time I was really hearing them in their avant-garde entirety. The semi-random sounds and snapshot vocal samples seared the air in a summation of life and music. `Twas grand, to say the least.

This album is really difficult to break down or sectionalize. As you listen to it, there are obvious changes of pace following the different songs, but somehow, the vein of the music always seems to remain in tact. From the first quasi-notes of "Enjoy Your Worries, You May Never Have Them Again" The Books seem to be reaching for a lifelike quality for their music that can really only be described by that same word: Life. This song has a straight beat that is surrounded by samples of people sort of talking through their problems. Mid-way through the song you hear an elderly lady discussing her problem with her heart conditions and some bad checks she was accused of writing. As this monologue goes on, you get drawn in until finally her voice seems to explode into nothingness and the song goes on. This type of forget-what-you-know attitude prevails with this band and particularly this album.

The record continues regardless with "All Our Base Are Belong To Them" where the listener is welcomed to the human race (ironically by an unfamiliar voice) and the band softly croons "I was born on the day that music died," a vocal testament to the sheer originality of this record. At times it does make one question what is music.

On "Motherless Bastard" a small boy is heard yelling for his mommy or daddy only to be met by a male voice informing him he has neither in a less than comforting manner. The song then continues serenely on in a fashion that almost makes one forget about the tragedy that opens the track. Fear not, though, we are quickly reminded of this terribly awkward and disheartening situation with a reprise of the clip. The pure emotion tugging power of this track is almost unnerving considering that this is probably the most up-front, straightforward track on the record.

The rest of the record continues on in a similar fashion, by the end, anointing the listener with The Books' amazing version of human experience.

9.2/10
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
It's got to be done 11 Nov 2002
By Alec Empire - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I'm not at all qualified to write a review of a cd like this, but people stumbling across this have to have some idea of how great this cd is, so theyll know to buy it. First of all, pitchforkmedia.com's review of this will probably do a better job than me. Well, the music's kind of a combination between glitch, folk, and found sound. It's pieces of guitar, violin, television commercials, and random conversations all chopped up into a strange mix that really shouldn't sound as good as it does by any means. it's certainly quirky, but at the same time, it's much more mature than say, schneider TM (not that i don't love the man). if you have any interest in experimental laptop music at all, this is a must buy.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Has a special spot in my record collection 3 Aug 2007
By chuck darwin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Even after having this cd for so long, it never ceases to amaze me how well the Books can compose music. It is impossible to define the Books music, there is no label that you could put on them that would satisfy. Experimental maybe, but that is just too broad. Each song emotes so much feeling, even without the use of vocals. With the exception of the samples, which have been beaten to death by others, but here they seem fresh and exciting.

"Motherless Ba***rd" begins with a man telling a child, "You have no mother or father... they left they went somewhere else." (Which is real by the way) Though strange and unsettling, it appears later on in the song with a whole different feeling to it. It doesn't seem as disturbing as it did before. Now what happened between the first time the clip appeared and the second is still a little bit of a mystery to me. But all I know is their music changed how I perceived what was said, and that in itself should say something about how much of an effect The Books music can have on you.

The other tracks on this album are equally effective and unique; the other-worldy "All Our Base Belong to Them"; the beautiful "Read, Eat, Sleep"; and "Enjoy Your Worries, You May Never Have Them Again" maintains as one of my favorite songs. There is something about this album that you just can't quite pin down, a quiet dignity; that is touching and profound. It's one you can just lie down and become totally taken away by. One of the best purchases I've ever made.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know

Product Images from Customers

Search

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for similar items by category


Feedback