Those Were the Days
 
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Those Were the Days

31 July 2006 | Format: MP3

£7.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 20 Feb 2006
  • Release Date: 20 Feb 2006
  • Label: Parlophone UK
  • Copyright: 2005 Dolly Parton. All rights reserved. This label copy information is the subject of copyright protection. All rights reserved. (C) 2005 Parlophone Records Ltd
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 44:00
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001J8IJ4G
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 32,894 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By J. A. Turnbull on 15 April 2006
Format: Audio CD
Now, there is no doubt that at times this album lapses into hopeless schmalz ("Imagine" is a case in point) and, depending on your view of Dolly Parton, this will either be completely damning or completely redemptive. However, there is no doubting that underneath all the layered harmonies, backing choirs and bluegrass frills, Parton is still a fine singer and, when she hits her stride, as in "Me & Bobby McGee", she's incredible. Elsewhere on the album, there are tracks that seem, at first listening, like potential car crashes (such as "Where Do The Children Play?" and the almost disco speed "Both Sides Now") but actually, after repeated listening, do start to grow on you, and that, I think, is true of the whole album: it is a grower, and, actually, a testimony to Parton as an interpreter of other writers' material, but if you don't have a strong stomach for bluegrass-lite sentimentality, I'd be wary.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Mr. D. Burrows on 17 Feb 2006
Format: Audio CD
I'm sorry but dispite my initial misgivings - another covers album - I must admit that this is far beyond the best I've heard to date. The songs are given a very sympathetic backing and Dolly's vocals are superb. She has included the writer or original singer on the track and anyone who can get Tommy James ("Crimson and Clover") back in the charts deserves ten stars anyway ..
The whole album retains a bluegrass feel and although Dolly's voice came out a bit twee on the 30 sec sample, on the cd itself it fits extremely well with the songs. The cd opens with a superb "Those were the days" with one Mary Hopkin on backing vocals and a Russian folk band at the fade out and it goes from strength to strength.
I'm biased towards the "Crimson and Clover" track and for once I can hear the lyrics but really once you've heard it all you won't turn it off. Just listen to her version of "Turn, turn, turn" or "Both sides now" - this is not a singer just doing a covers album but rather one catching up with her past.
Listen to her duet of "If i were a carpenter" it even puts the Johnny Cash version to shame .. my only regret with this cd is that like all good things it comes to an end too soon ..
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Peter Durward Harris #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on 11 May 2008
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is often regarded as Dolly's third covers album (after Great pretender and Treasures), but Dolly also recorded a Christmas covers album (Home for Christmas) and a gospel covers album (Precious memories) as well as an album of Porter Wagoner songs (My favorite songwriter Porter Wagoner). Nevertheless, if you're going to make comparisons, Great pretender (recorded during the Hollywood phase of Dolly's career) and Treasures (recorded during the mid-nineties when Dolly's albums weren't selling well) are the obvious albums to compare with. Actually, each of these albums differ in style so much that comparisons are pointless, even though one song (Turn turn turn) from Great pretender is reprised here.

I see from other reviews that while many people enjoy this album, others don't like it for a variety of reasons. I can understand that, but my tastes in music are fairly eclectic. Furthermore, I've spent more time through the years listening to Dolly's music than I have listening to any other artist, so I know not to have any preconceived ideas about what she records. This particular album features songs from the fifties, sixties and seventies recorded with country and bluegrass instrumentation. A stellar cast of supporting guests looks very impressive, though fans of those guests shouldn't buy the album in the hope of hearing their favorites because they'd have a hard job making most of them out. The prominence given to the names of some of the guests on the front cover may lead people to believe that this is a duets album, but there are only two duets here. The other tracks here are Dolly solos although some of the backing singers on these tracks are easier to discern than others.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 20 Feb 2006
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Although I prefer listening to Dolly singing her own compositions, this is an enjoyable CD. She is joined
by some of the original singers on some tracks (Mary Hopkins/Cat Stevens) and with Keith Urban on a nice
bluegrass version of the “Twelve Of Never”. Standout tracks are “Where Do The Children Play” and
“ Turn, Turn, Turn”. The production and sound is first class. Of course Dolly can write her own songs which are equal or better than the songs on this album, but maybe she’s recharging her song writing batteries and this is a good alternative while we wait for the next CD of originals.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By "jabsparty" on 24 Oct 2005
Format: Audio CD
Not being around in the 60s or 70s most songs on album are new to me so I have no previous judge point!
The album compared to Dolly's recent roots albums is quite upbeat and there isn't really any slow sad song on the album, which I have previously liked on other albums!
Highlights are 'Those Were The Days' Jewish sounding and an excellent opening song, great little party tune! 'Where Have All The Flowers Gone' is one of the few slow songs on the album with Dolly going for a more restrained high vocal sound. 'Where Do The Children Play' is probably my 2nd favourite on the album, pure heaven to hear! 'Turn, Turn, Turn' yet again another catchy tune that goes well with the rest of the album! Imagine is out of this world, I never liked the orginal but this version brings a new light to the song!
Overall the album flows very well and Dolly sounds great on all tracks! Only bad point is that it is over to soon and that Dolly does quite a few of the same Oh's in the beginning of songs!
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