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Thor: The World Eaters (Thor (Marvel Paperback)) [Paperback]

Matt Fraction , Dan Abnett
3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
Price: £14.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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Thor: The World Eaters (Thor (Marvel Paperback)) + Thor By Matt Fraction - Vol. 1 (Thor (Marvel Paperback)) + The Mighty Thor by Matt Fraction - Vol. 2 (Thor (Graphic Novels))
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Product details

  • Paperback: 216 pages
  • Publisher: MARVEL - US (30 Nov 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0785148396
  • ISBN-13: 978-0785148395
  • Product Dimensions: 25.4 x 16.5 x 1.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 296,401 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Thor: World Eaters "Contains material originally published in magazine form as Thor #615-621 and 620.1 and Thor spotlight"--Tp verso. Full description

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars All Aboard the Fraction Reign 7 Sep 2013
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
There may be spoilers ahead...

Previously in Thor:

Thor and all of Asgard died as a result of Ragnarok. Thor resurrected himself and all his people, and restored Asgard above the plains of Oklahoma outside the small town of Broxton. However, he neglected to resurrect the All-Father, Odin, who remained in Limbo, fighting and dying each day, to be reborn and fight again. Asgard was attacked by Norman Osborn's H.A.M.M.E.R. forces and his Dark Avengers team but were defeated by the Avengers. Asgard now lies in ruins. Loki had a hand in all of this, but died in battle, sacrificing himself.

This volume, written by Matt Fraction, is what happens next, and finishes off the numbering system of the Thor comics, which ended at 620.1, before Fraction took the helm of the Mighty Thor with a new numbering system from 1.

So what did happen next?

The Nine Realms are under attack from an inter-dimensional alien race. They intend to take over the vacant 'slot' left by Asgard's absence and rule in its stead. They start invading other realms, heading for Midgard, following the refugees of the Realm Eternal who are spilling out into Broxton.

Meanwhile, Thor is brooding over the loss of Loki. Despite his wicked ways and general evil-ness, Thor misses his brother, so sets out to resurrect him as he did previously. His search leads him to Paris, where he spies an urchin youth plying his magic tricks against tourists. Thor recognises his brother, now in a young body, and gives chase. After a quick bit of magic courtesy of Mjolnir, Loki is back, but not restored as an adult, but as "Kid" Loki who was the main character in the Journey Into Mystery comics by Kieron Gillen.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars ok book 16 Sep 2012
By TomH
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
The story is ok, but it feels like there are chunks of story left out! The artwork in this book is awful! Of all the thor book ive bought this is the worst one..
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars As soon as one Siege ends, another one begins 17 April 2013
By No More Mr. Mice Guy TOP 100 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
This storyline runs through Thor #615-621, and #620.1, collected as Thor: The World Eaters (Thor (Marvel Paperback)). This continues the story of Thor and Asgard immediately after the events of `Siege', with Asgard lying in ruins, and the Quantum Cosmologist Supreme trying to explain to Volstagg that because Asgard (the city) has vacated Asgard space (the space where Asgard (the city) used to be) at the top of the World Tree (which is really a metaphor for an Einstein-Rosen(berg) quantum gateway between multiverses), using food items to illustrate his ideas (which Volstagg keeps eating), and that therefore as nature abhors a vacuum, something will try and occupy said vacated space. And sure enough, the `World Eaters' break through from another collapsing universe looking for a new home, carving a path through the other Nine Worlds (though there are many more than nine, but the Asgardian world-view only requires them to see nine to be happy, or complete, or however world-views work - go ask a Quantum Cosmologist), driving the inhabitants of said Nine Worlds to seek protection in Asgard. Meanwhile, Thor has been missing his brother Loki, remembering their boyhoods together, and so `brings him back' (see the beginning of the current series for the background to that reincarnation stuff - Thor By J. Michael Straczynski Volume 1 TPB), only this time as the boy he remembers (with hilarious consequences, as will be revealed in subsequent volumes). Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not as epic as the art deserves 23 Feb 2013
Format:Paperback
O.K. First, the best thing about this book. The art is ACHINGLY beautiful. Honestly, it is the most exquisite art I have ever seen and perfectly fitted to Thor. It's almost worth reading just to lose yourself in this world. However, the story, while trying to be important and epic, just feels a bit flat and yet again Asgard gets a kicking in what basically boils down to a bunch of thugs destroying large sections of the world tree before having a big battle in Asgard-upon-Midgard. I'm really sick of that. I want Asgard back to being great and glorious, full of gods and a visual treat. Leave them alone, they have suffered enough! But anyway, the fallout from this story has a major bearing on the future of Thor and Asgard so is worth reading on that front. So, to conclude, a beautifully illustrated and ultimately important story but told without much originality or particular excitement.
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Amazon.com: 3.2 out of 5 stars  17 reviews
26 of 29 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A fraction of fun. 18 May 2011
By Axel - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
When it was initially announced that Matt Fraction would be taking over Thor and would be joined by Pascual Ferry, it would be fair to say that the anticipation for that team was fairly high. Fraction had relaunched an excellent Iron Man series a few years back and despite an obvious problem getting to the point at times, had managed to tell fairly entertaining stories during the first two years of that series. As for Ferry, it was clear that he was a talented artist and excellent turns on DC's Superman and other comics since, promised good things for Thor once the pair settled in.

Unfortunately, and despite some obvious talent, Matt Fraction indulges in all of his creative excesses in "Thor: World Eaters," and much of the anticipation and expectation has withered to ugly disappointment. In "World Eaters," readers are made to suffer through several fairly boring issues that can not be saved despite the best efforts of Ferry. Fraction repeats all the mistakes his work has now become well known for, including dedicating inconsequential characters undue amount of page time; single issues that advance the overall plot at the rate of molasses on a slightly tilted spoon (you'll be there a while, trust me); long winded exposition that is more appropriate for a day time drama; multiple issues dedicated to set-up and a weak, fairly anti-climactic conclusion. Indeed, Fraction's writing in Thor seems to be the comic book equivalent of that guy who starts off telling what promises to be a good joke, but who rambles on and on and on only to eventually deliver a weak, hardly laughable punchline. The writer also makes some incredibly bizarre story choices - although Loki is apparently responsible for the destruction of Asgard and the rather tragic, brutal events in "Siege," Thor makes the boneheaded and completely illogical decision to resurrect him. In the context of Fraction's story and that of the wider Marvel universe, the "resurrection" of Loki here strikes as a completely false note that is tailored more to considerations of expediency rather than good storytelling - given the nature of the "crimes" Loki is responsible for, it makes little in-story sense that any character, but especially Thor, would be moved to want his return. The real truth is that Fraction agreed to write Thor but needed the Loki crutch to try to make the run work. This aspect of the story is also problematic from a larger, conceptual point of view. One of the problems with Thor comics is the frequency with which characters "die" and return from the grave, a fact which routinely robs the series of any real sense of drama or peril. After all, if every character is simply going to be resurrected at a whim every time something happens, what's the point? Seriously, how many times can Balder's death be used as a plot point before we slip beyond the absurd into just plain incompetence?

By far though, the major problem with "World Eaters" is that Fraction simply dedicates too many chapters to a very thin idea. With little in the way of back story for the villains of the piece, what we are left with are the simple nuggets of an invasion story in which the main action involving the attempt to repel the invaders takes up less than 20% of the overall "saga" with the other 80% being taken up with pretentious and portentous ruminations by the main cast. Fraction also appears to fundamentally mis-cast the Asgardians as a fairly ineffectual people, resigned to their fates whenever it comes, a decision which seems at odds with the Norse or Viking roots of the characters and which makes cheering for our main cast, rather hard.

On the plus side, the art by Pascual Ferry is quite accomplished though occasionally sparse in some places, and he makes the best of the thin ideas Fraction gives him here. In part because Fraction has few real ideas to translate to pictures, Ferry is given some room to shine with many, many panels that stretch across both pages and gives the series a widescreen scope that might have made for exciting visuals if characters did more than talk. That isn't to mean that Ferry doesn't have his own issues - he draws Thor as a fairly hulking fellow up top with very short legs, a fact which tends to make the character look overly silly or outright cartoonish on occasion (in fact Ferry's Thor just occasionally resembles a helmeted Johnny Bravo.) Overall though, the art is very competent and one is left feeling a little sorry for Ferry that he isn't given more substantial or exciting material to work with.

The bottom line with "World Eaters" is that it's a fairly pedestrian story which generally fails to entertain. There are odd moments here and there which give a semblance of what might have been possible had the writer been able to convert his ideas into more exciting fare, but overall, this is a volume that will leave the reader fairly unsatisfied. For newcomers to Thor, I would recommend a Walt Simonson collection or even a Dan Jurgens paperback. For Fraction fans I would recommend "Ages of Thunder." For fans of the movie coming to Thor comics for the first time, I would recommend the Stracynski omnibus. Buy this only if you're a completist and are very curious.
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Fraction falls flat, for once. 17 May 2011
By Sean Curley - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
"Thor: The World Eaters" represents the merging of two major Marvel properties: longtime superhero Thor, whose title has obtained prominence not seen in decades since the relaunch under the pen of J. Michael Straczynski in 2007, and rising star writer Matt Fraction, whose ascent at Marvel began with the "Immortal Iron Fist" ongoing that he cowrote with Ed Brubaker shortly before Thor's return. Fraction had previously written the out-of-continuity "Thor: Ages of Thunder" miniseries and a "Secret Invasion" tie-in featuring the character, both of which (particularly the former) were generally well-received. As a result, his arrival on the title following JMS and the intermediary (but very good) tenure of Kieron Gillen was highly-anticipated. The result, however, is very disappointing. Spoilers follow.

Fraction takes over following the "Siege" event that saw Asgard ravaged by Norman Osborn's invasion forces, which culminated in the Sentry causing the city to tumble to the ground before being slain by Thor. Balder the Brave, Thor's brother, remains King of Asgard, while Thor, now restored to status amongst his people, finds himself mourning the death of his brother Loki. Despite Loki's evil, Thor still loved him for the happy times they spent together as children. Thus, Thor mounts a daring and risky plan to bring back his brother and hopefully redeem him. At the same time, an alien armada from a dying universe plans to enter the Nine Realms through the breach left by Asgard's relocation to Earth, posing a new challenge to the still-weakened Asgardians and the other races. In the face of the threat, it may be necessary to recall Odin from the grave.

There are the ingredients of a good story here, but Fraction fails to make them connect. The new villains are incredibly generic, and everything from their plans to their eventual defeat are carried out without provoking any spark of interest. The art by Pasqual Ferry aims to capture some of the original techno-mythic look of Jack Kirby, instead of the more purely low-tech appearance used by other artists since Thor's return; it has its moments, but it lacks epic scope, something this story really needs (particularly, the backgrounds are frequently very uninteresting). And Fraction continually includes scenes of a random human scientist character expositing his extraordinarily uninteresting explanations for what is going on.

A failure, sadly, from one of Marvel's better writers.
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Matt Fraction and Pasqual Ferry's disappointing re-boot of The Mighty Thor 23 May 2011
By G. Steirer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
Thor: The World Eaters collects issues #615-621 and #620.1 of Thor, all originally published between 2010 and 2011. The hardcover features high-gloss paper and finished boards with red-foil stamping. It suffers, however, from an overly tight spine, which sometimes obscures the inner edges of the artwork (an especially annoying problem here, as the layouts frequently stretch cross the spine). Bonus material includes interviews with Matt Fraction and Pasqual Ferry originally published in Thor Spotlight.

Story-wise, The World Eaters tells of a vague group of demonic beings lured to Earth through some hard-to-grasp (or plain nonsensical) quirk in space-time brought about by the fall of Asgard. As the demons journey through the nine realms, Odin and Loki are hastily and somewhat inexplicably resurrected by Thor (don't worry--this is not a spoiler). As other reviewers have noted, Matt Fraction's writing is in unusually bad form here with a story that is both too thin and too rushed. Of course, these are fairly typical faults in superhero storytelling (and ones that this reviewer, at least, could forgive), but in this case the action is scripted so badly--especially in the major battle sequences--that it's difficult even to follow what exactly is happening. The art only exacerbates this problem by being overly sketchy and rather lacking in depth in many places. Indeed, though Pasqual Ferry's pencils are not unattractive they're in need of much stronger inking than he delivers here. Matt Hollingsworth's coloring, however, is hands down terrible. Though pages done entirely in red may seem interesting at first, by the time issue #620 comes along (in which almost every page is done entirely in slight variations of a single shade of red), the single color is merely annoying. In the larger battles the monochromatic coloring also makes it difficult to identify to which side the various figures belong.

Issue #620.1, on the other hand, features a pleasant, single-issue story in which Thor must save Asgard from a mysterious villain. Written by Dan Abnett and Andy Lanning, with pencils by Mark Brooks and colors by Sonia Oback and John Raunch, this issue provides a brief glimpse of what a Thor comic book should look like.

If you're a diehard fan of Thor, you'll of course still want to pick this book up. More casual readers, however, should probably look elsewhere--there's a lot of great Thor graphic novels in print right now.
14 of 18 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars One of the worst THOR story arcs in history. STAY AWAY AT ALL COSTS! 15 July 2011
By Herbie Bookbinder - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
I've read every single issue of every volume of THOR, and this stands out as one of the worst. This is especially apparent coming off of the heels of the wonderful Kieron Gillen and J. Michael Straczynski runs.

Fraction is one of the "Marvel Architects." Translation: one of the overrated creators currently in vogue at Marvel. These THOR stories are extremely poorly written, and there is absolutely no substance in them. The villains are made out to be the greatest threat to ever face Asgard (again). Yet, they have zero back story, and they are simply cardboard bad guys. There's no emotion whatsoever; there's nothing and no one to care about.

Also, Fraction's utterly lame attempt at humor is embarrassingly bad, and his serious dialogue is unintentionally laughable.

Please read the current JOURNEY INTO MYSTERY title that features Thor and his supporting cast. There is no comparison between the two. In short, Fraction's THOR rates among the worst.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars All Aboard the Fraction Reign 30 Oct 2013
By Culleton - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
There may be spoilers ahead...

Previously in Thor:

Thor and all of Asgard died as a result of Ragnarok. Thor resurrected himself and all his people, and restored Asgard above the plains of Oklahoma outside the small town of Broxton. However, he neglected to resurrect the All-Father, Odin, who remained in Limbo, fighting and dying each day, to be reborn and fight again. Asgard was attacked by Norman Osborn's H.A.M.M.E.R. forces and his Dark Avengers team but were defeated by the Avengers. Asgard now lies in ruins. Loki had a hand in all of this, but died in battle, sacrificing himself.

This volume, written by Matt Fraction, is what happens next, and finishes off the numbering system of the Thor comics, which ended at 620.1, before Fraction took the helm of the Mighty Thor with a new numbering system from 1.

So what did happen next?

The Nine Realms are under attack from an inter-dimensional alien race. They intend to take over the vacant 'slot' left by Asgard's absence and rule in its stead. They start invading other realms, heading for Midgard, following the refugees of the Realm Eternal who are spilling out into Broxton.

Meanwhile, Thor is brooding over the loss of Loki. Despite his wicked ways and general evil-ness, Thor misses his brother, so sets out to resurrect him as he did previously. His search leads him to Paris, where he spies an urchin youth plying his magic tricks against tourists. Thor recognises his brother, now in a young body, and gives chase. After a quick bit of magic courtesy of Mjolnir, Loki is back, but not restored as an adult, but as "Kid" Loki who was the main character in the Journey Into Mystery comics by Kieron Gillen.

Thor also frees Odin from Limbo, recognising that in order to defeat these World Eaters, they may need the power of the All-Father. And so ensues the mighty battle between the Nine Realms and the World Eaters.

This is a terrific story which kick-starts Matt Fraction's work on Thor, which became The Mighty Thor after this volume. The artwork by Pasqual Ferry is stunning, and their chemistry clearly worked as they paired up again for The Mighty Thor, Vol. 2. As is usual during Fraction's reign, he spends a lot of time focusing on the mortal people of Broxton, and none more so than in this book, which I have found always refreshing.

This volume also features a story written by Dan Abnett and Andy Lanning, with artwork by Mark Brooks, which is a slight filler issue before Fraction restarted the title with The Mighty Thor. It features the Grey Gargoyle infiltrating the ruins of Asgard on the search for an apple of immortality, and whilst an enjoyable one-issue romp, it is not as strong as the Fraction epic. There's also an interesting interview with Fraction at the back of the book, which delves into the upcoming reign.

An enjoyable book, which led to an enjoyable and exhilarating ride by Fraction, (and also Gillen's Journey Into Mystery) all of which I've reviewed here and rated very highly, and it all started here.
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