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Thomas Paine's Rights of Man (Books That Changed the World) Audio CD – Audiobook, CD, Unabridged

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Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Tantor Media, Inc; Unabridged edition (1 Sept. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1400103916
  • ISBN-13: 978-1400103911
  • Product Dimensions: 16.3 x 2.8 x 13.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,691,286 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Christopher Hitchens (1949-2011) was the author of Letters to a Young Contrarian, and the bestseller No One Left to Lie To: The Values of the Worst Family. A regular contributor to Vanity Fair, The Atlantic Monthly and Slate, Hitchens also wrote for The Weekly Standard, The National Review, and The Independent, and appeared on The Daily Show, Charlie Rose, The Chris Matthew's Show, Real Time with Bill Maher, and C-Span's Washington Journal. He was named one of the world's "Top 100 Public Intellectuals" by Foreign Policy and Britain's Prospect.

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Review

"A better case can be made for the claim that Thomas Paine's Rights of Man actually affected history than for other books so far published in the series, and Christopher Hitchens makes it with characteristic verve and style. An engaging account of Paine's life and times [that is] well worth reading" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Christopher Hitchens (1949-2011) was a contributing editor to Vanity Fair and Visiting Professor in liberal studies at the New School in New York. He was the author of numerous books, including works on Thomas Jefferson, Thomas Paine, George Orwell, Mother Theresa, Henry Kissinger and Bill and Hillary Clinton, as well as the international bestseller and National Book Award nominee, god Is Not Great. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By damopop on 20 July 2010
Format: Hardcover
Hitchens turns a great phrase. He throws himself into his subject and you get the impression that that could be anything. Whatever's on his mind will find it's way into Vanity Fair one day, into Newsweek the next, and nearly everything he says will be broadcast on YouTube within a day or two. He is a fascinating writer and polemicist and - you sense even more so than Jefferson or even Orwell - Thomas Paine appears to be his great inspiration. An Englishman crosses the pond in search of revolution and enlightenment. Makes friends, makes enemies. Witnesses great things. Writes about them. Always takes a side. But in light of Hitchens' changes of opinion - or at least perspective - over the last decade or so, you sense he longs for the days of Paine, when a man could change his mind and so change his side. The wonderful illustration of Paine's relationship with Burke gives the reader a sense not only of the development of western ideologies in the early modern era, but of what it's like to be Christopher Htchens. When friends become enemies this is what it's like - and your enemies define you as much as your friends. Hitchens is not a post-structuralist. He does not believe authors to be dead. For him, Thomas Paine is alive and so this biography breathes and pulses throughout its 140-or-so pages. Definately worth a shot!
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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Theodore A. Rushton on 24 Oct. 2006
Format: Hardcover
Everyone who loves freedom will adore this book.

Buy it. You don't need to read further. Buy it, you'll love it. But, if you're a masochist willing to submit yourself to my views, read on. Then buy it.

This is Hitchens at his best; a chronic kicker who thinks he's clever and would dearly love to be the Tom Paine of today. He's writing about a genuine soulmate; both men are champions of the chaos of change and the beauty of unrestrained libertarianism. Hitchens understands Paine, because he's a carbon copy of his hero -- tenth carbon, perhaps, but nonetheless a genuine copycat. This is Hitchens at his best.

It's delightful because it makes you think. It doesn't matter if Hitchens is right or wrong. What matters is that every reader will finish this book with a greater and profound understanding of the freedom that was bursting out in the 1750-1848 era. It's my view that revolution is 90 percent fluff and fury; Paine was the 'Dallas cheerleader' in charge of fluff for the American Revolution, with the added bonus of a doctoral dissertation on freedom in 'Common Sense'.

Hitchens astutely quotes Madame Roland who described Paine as ". . . better at lighting the way for revolution than drafting a constitution . . . or the day-to-day work of a legislator". True enough. But, take away Paine, and the Revolution would have lost its most enthusiastic and articulate voice. The eventual US government was invented by Washington, Jefferson, Adams, Franklin, Madison and the like; but, without Paine they might never have had the opportunity to invent a new government.

Paine and Hitchens can be grievously wrong, such as attacking hereditary institutions.
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By Dodo VINE VOICE on 12 May 2010
Format: Audio CD
Short tribute to Thomas Paine who was an atheist who did a lot of good for mankind concerning equality and human rights.He contributed to human progress regarding political freedom for the individual and a better world. A lot of the rights we now take for granted are due to the wonderful thinking (outside the box,lol) of this amazing man.He was against slavery of the body or mind.
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Format: Hardcover
Hitchens obviously had a great time revisiting Paine's life for this book. He's at his sharp and acerbic best here.
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