FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Thomas Cranmer: A Life has been added to your Basket
Condition: Used: Good
Trade in your item
Get a £1.29
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Thomas Cranmer: A Life Paperback – 4 Dec 1997

19 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£18.99
£12.24 £8.29
£18.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Save £20 on Amazon.co.uk with the aqua Classic card. Get an initial credit line of £250-£1,200 and build your credit rating. Representative 32.9% APR (variable). Subject to term and conditions. Learn more.

Frequently Bought Together

Thomas Cranmer: A Life + Reformation : Europe's House Divided 1490-1700 + A History of Christianity: The First Three Thousand Years
Price For All Three: £44.41

Buy the selected items together


Win a £5,000 Amazon.co.uk Gift Card and 30 Kindle E-readers for your child or pupil's school.
Vote for your child or pupil(s) favourite book(s) here to be in with a chance to win.

Product details

  • Paperback: 704 pages
  • Publisher: Yale University Press; New edition edition (4 Dec. 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0300074484
  • ISBN-13: 978-0300074482
  • Product Dimensions: 23.2 x 15.6 x 4.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 256,085 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Inside This Book

(Learn More)
First Sentence
THIS BOOK TELLS A man's life-story, and tries to do it as far as possible in sequence. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

79 of 83 people found the following review helpful By Mr E Q F Brown on 9 Mar. 2002
Format: Paperback
Thomas Cranmer was one of the inexperienced of all the 103 Archbishops of Canterbury when he was elevated from his brief tenure as Archdeacon of Taunton, after 20 years as a don at Cambridge, however despite this was to prove one of the most significant occupants of St Augustine's throne: his liturgy, the Act of 39 Articles, most of them identical to his 42 Articles, and the Royal Supremacy remain on the statute book to this day. In this magnificent and beautifully written book, MacCullock weaves together the theological and political parts of Cranmer's life, and provides a comprehensive account as to how these two motivations, often in conflict, impacted upon him.
Thomas Cranmer is a complex character, and MacCullock deals fully with his contradictions: burning with hatred for the heresies of Rome, yet unusually (for the times) compassionate and often forgiving to his critics; uncertain and treading a very cautious path with Henry VIII, yet showing an absolute determination to push the Church of England towards a more evangelical perspective whenever he was given a free hand; weakened and broken by his imprisonment, yet finally triumphant in his last denunciation of all that Mary's church stood for. MacCullock clearly admires the Archbishop, but this does not make him blind to his faults: in praise or censure however he always presents all of Cranmer's actions in their political and theological context.
While the book is fully comprehensive on the political aspects of the mid 16th century, where MacCullock really stands out in is his detailed and highly precise awareness of theological controversies of the time. MacCullock has studied a vast array of 16th century theologians, and examined how they fitted into Cranmer's life.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 20 Jun. 1998
Format: Paperback
MacCulloch has penned a prodigious and comprehensive biography of Thomas Cranmer. Serious questions about the development of his thought, theology and ecclesiology are given special attention. These are cast in relations to the contemporary political (local and international) situtations to better enable a reader to understand the man, his times and his influence. Given the stages over which the Henrician and Edwardian church reformations progressed, understanding Cranmer's central and guiding actions seems to be MacCulloch strongest sections. Emphasis, then, on Cranmer's central work in life is properly and comprehensively treated, without being severely colored by all that has been penned about his final days. Nevertheless, MacCulloch has done a convincing job of helping one to see Cranmer's sincerity of reform purposes, his pragmatic concerns about the pace of change, his understanding of the needs of commonfolk (as opposed to the middle and upper classes), his fierce opposition to established orders (friers and, later, radicals [nonconformists]). Especially instuctive is the secion on Cranmer's Prayer Book writing purpose, style and method, his borrowings, his innovations, and his synthses. For a 600 page, book, I found it a thoroughly compelling reading experience from first to last (about 6 days).
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
51 of 57 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 15 Nov. 1998
Format: Paperback
Traditionally, one is to give something up or take something on as a Lenten discipline. I did the latter, albeit inadvertently. Around Ash Wednesday of 1998, I began Darmaid MacCulloch's magisterial biography of Thomas Cranmer (Yale University Press 1996). I finished this magnificent tome on Holy Saturday. As the time passed, I came to realize that this Lent was for me a time to study a key figure in the Church and compare his often--to modern Episcopalians-- unorthodox theology against what I have come to believe.
Thomas Cranmer is a pillar of Episcopal history (and hagiography). One literally cannot participate in a Sunday service without reciting or hearing his words. In 1549, he compiled the first Book of Common Prayer. Many of the collects we say are either his original compositions or alterations upon existing texts. MacCulloch says of the Collects:
There is little doubt we owe him [Cranmer] the present form of the sequence of eighty-four seasonal collects and a dozen or so further examples embedded elsewhere in the 1549 services: no doubt either that these jewelled miniatures are one of the chief glories of the Anglican liturgical tradition, a particularly distinguished development of the genre of brief prayer which is peculiar to the Western Church. Their concise expression has not always won unqualified praise, especially from those who consider that God enjoys extended addresses from his creatures; but they have proved one of the most enduring vehicles of worship in the Anglican communion.
To me, today, the Collects focus and gather the scripture for each service.
Cranmer's beliefs were distinct, certain, and in some respects quite different from what I had thought.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Ian C. Kemp on 6 Aug. 2011
Format: Hardcover
As other reviewers have commented, this is not light reading, but contains a huge amount of information of interest to anyone interested either in history or theology. I felt I got a much deeper feel of both the Machiavellian complexities of Tudor court politics and the way the Church of England and its liturgy were developed. Harold Wilson said "A week is a long time in politics"; I had never realised that it applied just as much in Henry VIII's day, and of course the consequences for people like Anne Boleyn and Cromwell (and eventually Cranmer himself) could be much more serious than just losing your office .... McCulloch's writing gives a detailed and balanced portrait of Cranmer the man, sympathetic but not hagiographic, and likewise for all the other protagonists. The general reader will enjoy the narrative, but the work is also impeccably referenced through extensive footnotes for the academic.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback