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This Will Make You Smarter Hardcover – 1 Mar 2012

17 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Doubleday (1 Mar. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 085752111X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0857521118
  • Product Dimensions: 16.1 x 3.7 x 24 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 362,837 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

"The world's smartest website... Edge is a salon for the world's finest minds" (Guardian)

Book Description

New Scientific Concepts to Improve Your Thinking

Inside This Book

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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Miguel Ribeiro on 12 May 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I've mixed feelings: rationally I like the idea, emotionally it didn't work with me. Though many of the individual contributions work well others don't, may be because they are too condensed or because they don't stand well out of their broader context. In the end, even though inspired by some of the texts, the overwhelming feeling was as if I had been watching a celebrity parade
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Robert Morris TOP 500 REVIEWER on 30 Jan. 2013
Format: Paperback
Many of those who purchase and then begin to read this book will learn, for the first time, about Edge.org, a website offering an abundance of resources. John Brockman is the Editor of This Will Make You Smarter (2012) and This Explains Everything (2013). He is also the Editor and Publisher of Edge. As he explains, its purpose is to "arrive at the edge of the world's knowledge, seek out the most complex and sophisticated minds, put them in a room together, and have them ask each other the questions they are asking themselves."

He goes on to suggest, "Edge is a Conversation: Edge is different from the Algonquin Roundtable or Bloomsbury Group, but it offers the same quality of intellectual adventure. Closer resemblances are the early seventeenth-century Invisible College, a precursor to the Royal Society. Its members consisted of scientists such as Robert Boyle, John Wallis, and Robert Hooke. The Society's common theme was to acquire knowledge through experimental investigation. Another inspiration is The Lunar Society of Birmingham, an informal club of the leading cultural figures of the new industrial age -- James Watt, Erasmus Darwin, Josiah Wedgewood, Joseph Priestly, and Benjamin Franklin."

In 2011, those involved with Edge were asked to respond to a question proposed by Steven Pinker and seconded by Daniel Kahneman: 'What scientific concept would improve everyone's cognitive toolkit?" Pinker ("Positive Sum Games") and Kahneman ("The Focusing Illusion") were also among the 160 contributors.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Charles Lowe on 7 April 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Definitely a great summary of important scientific, sociological and philosophical knowledge, condensed into very short summaries. Highly recommended as an accessible book that you can just dip into.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 26 April 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
Packed full of wonderful and brief contributions that illuminate and enlighten across a broad range of scientific principles. It makes you think and challenges your assumptions. No bad thing
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Robert Morris TOP 500 REVIEWER on 1 Feb. 2013
Format: Paperback
Many of those who purchase and then begin to read this book will learn, for the first time, about Edge.org, a website offering an abundance of resources. John Brockman is the Editor of This Will Make You Smarter (2012) and This Explains Everything (2013). He is also the Editor and Publisher of Edge. As he explains, its purpose is to "arrive at the edge of the world's knowledge, seek out the most complex and sophisticated minds, put them in a room together, and have them ask each other the questions they are asking themselves."

He goes on to suggest, "Edge is a Conversation: Edge is different from the Algonquin Roundtable or Bloomsbury Group, but it offers the same quality of intellectual adventure. Closer resemblances are the early seventeenth-century Invisible College, a precursor to the Royal Society. Its members consisted of scientists such as Robert Boyle, John Wallis, and Robert Hooke. The Society's common theme was to acquire knowledge through experimental investigation. Another inspiration is The Lunar Society of Birmingham, an informal club of the leading cultural figures of the new industrial age -- James Watt, Erasmus Darwin, Josiah Wedgewood, Joseph Priestly, and Benjamin Franklin."

In 2011, those involved with Edge were asked to respond to a question proposed by Steven Pinker and seconded by Daniel Kahneman: 'What scientific concept would improve everyone's cognitive toolkit?" Pinker ("Positive Sum Games") and Kahneman ("The Focusing Illusion") were also among the 160 contributors.
Read more ›
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By Rhiannon Monk on 15 July 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Although I was aware that this book was used, I thought, due to the description that it would be in good condition. However, this was not the case, and so I couldn't give it as a present. Luckily, I had been wanting to read the book too, so I kept it anyway. If you are looking for a high quality book this version isn't for you, but the actual content of the book is great.
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11 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Lyon on 2 July 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a really good book. Lots of thoughtful essays by all kinds of people - and several of them run counter to one another, giving even more food for thought: is Argument 1 more persuasive than Argument 2, or vice versa? Or is it possible to synthesise them into a new Argument 3?

And it's very dippable, too: the essays are quite short, and you don't feel obliged to read the book without interruption.

I'd have given it five stars were it not for the title. 'This will make you smarter' makes it sound (a) like a self-help book and (b) smug. Neither of which is calculated to make a Brit like me feel comfortable with it. A good job I bought it on Kindle, then...
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