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This Little Girl's Gone Rockin' [CD]

Glenda Collins Audio CD
4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
Price: 9.32 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over 10. Details
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Product details

  • Audio CD (2 Feb 2009)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Rpm
  • ASIN: B000024URR
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 90,921 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Take A Chance
2. Crazy Guy
3. Oh How I Miss You Tonight
4. Age For Love
5. Head Over Heels In Love
6. Find Another Fool
7. I Lost My Heart At The Fairground
8. I Feel So Good
9. If You Gotta Pick A Baby
10. In The First Place
11. Baby It Hurts
12. Nice Wasn't It
13. Lollipop
14. Everybody's Got To Fall In Love
15. Johnny Love Me
16. Paradise For Two
17. Thou Shalt Not Steal
18. Been Invited To A Party
19. Something I Got To Tell You
20. My Heart Didn't Lie
See all 28 tracks on this disc

Customer Reviews

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4.8 out of 5 stars
4.8 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
It may be slightly sad to say it for the artist in question but it is always great to discover someone from the 60s that never really made it & who you've never heard on the radio but which today sounds fresh,raw & brilliant taking you back to that wonderful period of the 60s. Such is the case with this release & Glenda Collins who must have been really disillusioned back at the time by her fate in the charts. Glenda has a strong slightly deep voice and this (her voice) emerges as the strongest point of this CD, which covers the 7 years from 1960 to 1966. During this period she released a grand total of 11 singles, all contained within, but because none were ever hits then no LP was ever forthcoming. These original singles now cost a fortune mainly because of the Joe Meek connections & because they were such poor sellers. Rather than go through every track will mention my 3 favourites. Opening track (her debut 1960 single A side) 'Take A Chance' is both a pretty & a strong ballad. 10th single Howard Blaikley's 'Something I Gotta Tell You' is a strong up-tempo ballad & surely deserved to be a hit - a highlight. Follow up 11th A side 'It's Hard To Believe It' was a very creative disc wrapped in sound effects and with a strong message (written by Meek) and deserved a better fate - impressive. The people at RGM have to be congratulated on this really great compilation plus liner notes. Beautiful solid female 60s pop.

[Footnote 12Oct2013: Just wanted to say a little something more about this delightful album. It still brings me down as to how beautiful it is and 'Don't Let It Rain On Sunday', Self Portrait', 'C'est La Vie' are others that we can add to the list of brilliance. The opening volley of those 6 pre-Joe Meek songs are also all wonderous.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant but unlucky no-hit wonder 30 July 2005
By Peter Durward Harris #1 HALL OF FAME TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD
The history of pop music is filled with singers who might have become big stars but didn't. Usually, these singers had one or two hit records, however minor, but Glenda Collins somehow failed to register a hit of any size. A closer look at her story shows that she was desperately unlucky. After several years trying, she quit the business but later realized that she may have quit too soon. Nevertheless, this collection contains both sides of every single that Glenda recorded and which can be found - it is possible that other recordings were made but this is unclear.
Glenda was just sixteen when she began her recording career in 1960 for Decca. Her first two singles sold poorly and nothing more appeared until 1962 when a third single fared much better but still didn't chart so Decca dropped her. Meanwhile, Glenda had kept busy with radio and cabaret work.
At this point, Glenda's father managed to get her a recording deal with Joe Meek, a maverick independent producer who was very successful with many different singers and groups but is perhaps best remembered for his production of Telstar, a British and American number one hit for the Tornados. In fact, the Tornados also acted as backing musicians for some of Joe Meek's other artists and they fulfilled this duty on Glenda's first single for her new label, the brilliant I lost my heart in the fairground, featuring fairground sounds and plenty of Joe Meek touches in the production. It should have been a huge hit but wasn't because its release to the public was delayed. When it finally appeared, the Beatles and other Mersey groups had taken over the charts and Glenda's record didn't sell.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The problem here is........ 12 April 2008
By Richard
Format:Audio CD
Until the CD Age no one had any idea who Glenda Collins was but people know who Joe Meek was.So that's why this CD exists.
There was no album or vinyl comp and the singles came and went.
So did those of Lyn Cornell who was another fine singer-though her turn would come in 1964 when she was one of the Carefrees and again in the 70s when she was half of the Pearls.
If Glenda Collins had recorded a Beatles cover that could have made all the difference.After all you go for the most obvious.
Pop music is littered with failures by girl singers and its the luck of the draw.Thus Susan Singer never troubled a chart even though she was Helen Shapiro's cousin
Its nothing to do with Merseybeat taking over-even Joe Meek was part of the British Invasion.All these theories simply don't hold water
The sleeve on this CD is bloody awful.Why didn't they use that photo of her on the Future Legend site which shows her in a full skirt and petticoats in a pose reminiscent of Susan Maughan? This photo is on the Home Page of my Yahho Groups HIGH SCHOOL POP
I never bought this CD as I don't like the sleeve though Glenda Collins is on various Meek compilations as well as American collections of Pixie Girls I have.No they don't know who she was either
But true she deserved a better fate than becoming a No Hit Wonder only heard on Saturday Club.Unlike Sandie Shaw she could sing in tune
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unlucky girl who could have been a huge star 25 Nov 2007
By T.M.G.
Format:Audio CD
Glenda Collins. You could probably ask a thousand people if they'd ever heard of her, and be guaranteed they'd all have no idea. Even those around in the 60s, when Glenda was recording, would be hard pressed to place her.

Glenda never made it big - in fact, she barely made any impression at all. There's one reason why this CD is available, and one reason only: Joe Meek. Yes, Britain's answer to Phil Spector, renowned for hits like Telstar and Have I the Right, produced most of Glenda's work. Meek was not known for harnessing female talent, mainly due to his sexual persuasions: if he liked the look of a boy, whether he could sing or not held no bearing. But with the ladies, talent was all Joe looked for. This aspect of Joe's career is explored more fully on the collection 'Joe Meek's Girls'.

But back to Glenda. A young girl with a fine voice, she auditioned for and was quickly signed to Decca Records in 1960, where she recorded three singles. This was Britain before the Beatles and the beat boom that followed them. Lightweight rock 'n' roll love songs aimed at teenagers were the order of the day. Mainly covers of American songs, and churned out by the studios like a production line. If you enjoy that era of British pop music, then you'll like these songs. I personally enjoy all of them - great innocent pop music.

Since Decca didn't bring Glenda any success, she went looking elsewhere, and wound up at 304 Holloway Road, home of Joe Meek and his ramshackle recording studio. Joe had just enjoyed immense success thanks to Telstar, and was ready for more. Glenda filled a gap on Joe's roster for a female singer, and having been impressed with her voice, he signed her up. From here on, the sound of Glenda's records changed markedly.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars  6 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant but unlucky no-hit wonder 25 July 2005
By Peter Durward Harris - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
The history of pop music is filled with singers who might have become big stars but didn't. Usually, these singers had one or two hit records, however minor, but Glenda Collins somehow failed to register a hit of any size. A closer look at her story shows that she was desperately unlucky. After several years trying, she quit the business but later realized that she may have quit too soon. Nevertheless, this collection contains both sides of every single that Glenda recorded and which can be found - it is possible that other recordings were made but this is unclear.

Glenda was just sixteen when she began her recording career in 1960 for Decca. Her first two singles sold poorly and nothing more appeared until 1962 when a third single fared much better but still didn't chart so Decca dropped her. Meanwhile, Glenda had kept busy with radio and cabaret work.

At this point, Glenda's father managed to get her a recording deal with Joe Meek, a maverick independent producer who was very successful with many different singers and groups but is perhaps best remembered for his production of Telstar, a British and American number one hit for the Tornados. In fact, the Tornados also acted as backing musicians for some of Joe Meek's other artists and they fulfilled this duty on Glenda's first single for her new label, the brilliant I lost my heart in the fairground, featuring fairground sounds and plenty of Joe Meek touches in the production. It should have been a huge hit but wasn't because its release to the public was delayed. When it finally appeared, the Beatles and other Mersey groups had taken over the charts and Glenda's record didn't sell.

Glenda's next single, If you've got to pick a baby, showed that she and Joe Meek had adapted their sound (The Outlaws replaced the Tornados as backing musicians) and she performed the song on important TV pop shows to support its release. With rave reviews, this also might have been a big hit in the run-up to Christmas. The record was so popular that initial pressings sold quickly but the record company didn't press any more. They were too busy with the Beatles and the Dave Clark Five. By the time it was possible to press more copies, the momentum had been lost.

With two obvious opportunities for major hits lost, Glenda (through no fault of her own) found the going tough after that. Her next few singles didn't get the publicity accorded to her two missed chances although they are excellent records in their own way. Joe Meek committed suicide on the eighth anniversary of Buddy Holly's death (a date that may have been deliberately chosen by Joe).

Following Joe's death, Glenda's father managed to get hold of a couple of songs that eventually became top ten hits for others. Nobody can even know what would have happened if Glenda had recorded them first. With more opportunities for female singers in the late sixties, Glenda might finally have had that big hit. However, Glenda had lost heart and quit.

So we are left with a legacy of what might have been. If those two big misses had both been big hits, who knows how many of the later misses would also have been big hits? We will never know, but this compilation shows that Glenda Collins was every bit as good as many of her compatriots who had plenty of hits.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A dream come true! 4 April 2003
By girlgroupmeekfreak - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
I have been infatuated with the work of Glenda Collins for a few years through the earlier reissues of such numbers as "It's hard to believe it", "Something i've got to tell you" and "I lost my heart at the fairground". All of these felt like unwrapping imported chocolates when first heard, not only for Joe Meeks bizarre beauty, but the unique talent of the lady herself. Discovering this cd was truly a dream come true. Some of the other songs which I had never heard were even better than the original trio for me. "If you gotta pick a baby", "Baby it hurts", "Paradise for two", "Nice wasnt it" the list goes on and on. The most impressive prize, for me, was "Self Portrait" an unreleased gem unlike any other i've heard from Meek. My only gripe is the first six tracks, which are all pre-Meek. Glenda never really got the right push from any music producers besides Meek. All in all, this stands as a glorious testament to the striking talents of all involved.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Joe Meek's Premier Entry in the British Girl Singer Scene 11 April 2001
By Randall E. Adams - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Because of the incredible glut of talented singers and artists making records in the 1960s, many very worthwhile people were lost in the shuffle. Glenda Collins falls into this category, her only claim to fame now being the fact that she was produced by cult hero Joe Meek for most of her recording career.
In fact Glenda Collins is one of the few artists, and only female singer, with whom Meek worked for an extended period of time (1963 until death in 1967). Obviously mindful of the fact that she probably had the best voice of any of his roster, Meek lavished enormous attention on her records from the very first ("I Left My Heart at the Fairground" with its circus sound effects and galloping rhythm) to the very last ("It's Hard to Believe It" with its surreal lyrics, rocket launcher noises and heavenly choir). While some of the records are masterworks of Meek's eccentric taste, others are simply great mid-60s archetypes, such as rockaballad "Baby It Hurts" and the thoroughly raunchy sounding "Been Invited to a Party."
Meek tried everything to make Glenda a hit. With "Johnny Loves Me," he tried a bubblegum bluebeat sound. With "Sing C'est la Vie" he adopted an extremely irritating continental novelty sound that sticks in your head so persistently that you KNOW it would have been a great hit with the unsophisticated if it had not been left in the can following Meek's suicide. And also in the can at the time of Meek's death were a batch of unfinished masters clearly following the Petula Clark model of mid-60s midtempo pop rock.
The only dull tracks on this collection are the few things recorded before Glenda signed on with Meek. These merely serve to underscore the brilliance of Meek's work with his favorite female vocalist.
If you enjoy the records of people like Sandi Shaw, try out Glenda Collins. If you have experienced some other Meek productions, this set is highly recommended. This is where you will find a good number of fantastic Meek moments.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars and you Thought you'd Heard it All. 31 Jan 2007
By J. Shephard - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
the amazing thing about the current downpouring of CD releases is that things like this FANTASTIC piece of history are reissued. There's this weird perception about how "they aren't making any more oldies". While at first glance this seems to be a true statement, if one is to step outside the HIT MACHINE-mentality that obscures an amazing portion of music history, it is easy to start to phantom that NO AMOUNT of effort will ever dry up the well. So many records were made that the number of hours of recorded product far out-number the actual number of hours available to listen to it all.

So if you are a BRAVE archeologist like me, who enjoys digging in the musical mines, things like GLENDA COLLINS are constantly being unearthed.

The cover alone is priceless. But Joe Meek is the Bomb. If you're like me and you REALLY pay attention when you listen to a record,, this guy is a virtual Kreskin of Sounds.

By the way, speaking of JOE MEEK, 21 years ago, when our twins were baby girls waiting to be born...(in 16 days) I made a Christmas Mix Cassette. In amongst the Jingle Bells and Let it Snow and Happy Christmas, I placed "Telstar" by the Tornadoes. This past holiday we played the tape for the 21st time. That song STILL sounds like Christmas to us. It's uncanny.

Get this CD. Thank Glenda.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hope we hear from you again, Glenda Collins!! 4 May 2004
By uthungus - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
I ABSOLUTELY LOVE Glenda Collins' voice! Aside from a truly belting quality to it she also had an amusing tendency to very clearly PRO-NOUNCE her lyrics, which was not always fashionable in the 60s. I have to disagree with others that said her pre-Joe Meeks work wasn't the best or a credit to this collection. It's just that music was very different at the beginning of the decade and changed drastically throughout. Here earlier pieces - "Crazy Guy", "Take a Chance", "Oh How I Miss You", "Find Another Fool" , etc. were very elegant and far above the standard sweet teenage girl-group genre that came to be later. She was leaning more toward a Joann Campbell style that apparently didn't catch on for such a young girl. Similarly Connie Stevens went through a transformation when her more sophisticated earlier work faded in to the background and she started doing "Cutsie-poo" (circa "Hawaiian Eye")! Other famous British divas like Petula Clark and Alma Cogan didn't really start doing the "Novelty" stuff until they'd already established themselves elsewhere either. I do love many of her Meeks tracks, though. Some just didn't suit her vocal capability and would have caught on as better novelty tunes covered by more oddball-sounding female singers. Though personally I do consider her quirky space-age cover of "Lollipop" to be the "official 60's version" of the popular Chordettes classic! From the echo-reverb "pop" sound to the "Caravelleo Candy Bar Commercial" ba-ba-bing bing arrangement! When she cuts loose on other hi-tech numbers like "You're Gonna Get Your Way", "Don't let it Rain on Sunday", "If you're Gonna Pick a Baby" and others like these you get a sense of a better re-direction of her energy. Although I also love the other, somewhat lighthearted stuff like "Fairground", "Johnny L-o-v-e-s Me", "This Girl's Gone Rockin'", etc. these just didn't make the best use of her vocal capabilities, IMO. Lastly, I do hope that the liner notes are accurate and she does again record/perform some day! It would truly be a loss if she gave it up entirely.
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