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This Little Church Had None Paperback – 1 Sep 2009


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Product details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Evangelical Press & Services Ltd; First edition (1 Sep 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0852347081
  • ISBN-13: 978-0852347089
  • Product Dimensions: 21.6 x 14.1 x 1.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 831,648 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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6 of 10 people found the following review helpful By E. H. Andrews on 16 Mar 2010
Format: Paperback
The 18th century British artist William Hogarth painted a series of eight pictures entitled "The rake's progress", which depict the progressive downfall of a wealthy and well-endowed young man. In turn he lost his first love, his reputation, his money, his self-respect, his liberty and finally his mind. As Gary Gilley deftly charts the `progress' of evangelicalism during the 20th century in his latest book, I couldn't avoid making comparisons.
Like the two previous volumes in his "This little church ..." series, "This little church had none" is a gracious but unflinching analysis of modern non-conformity in USA and elsewhere. Gilley is a master diagnostician of cultural trends. In Part 1 of this book he shows how churches that were once endowed with the "unsearchable riches of Christ" and rooted firmly in the Scriptures as the Word of God, became weary of biblical orthodoxy and set off in pursuit of new objectives such as popularity, numerical success, influence and acceptance by the world. Drifting away from their biblical roots, they embraced in turn a liberal modernity which sets human reason above revelation; a seeker-sensitivity that prioritizes man's felt needs; a mega-church mentality intoxicated by its own success; a prosperity gospel which deludes and disappoints its followers; a philosophical pragmatism that rewrites the church's theology; a postmodernism that denies absolute truth; and a new-age `ancient-future' spirituality which owes nothing to Scripture and everything to medieval mysticism. The "riches of wisdom and knowledge" that are found only in Christ have been squandered on an altar of ambition, indiscipline and self-indulgence.
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Amazon.com: 6 reviews
26 of 27 people found the following review helpful
A devastating critique 16 Mar 2010
By E. H. Andrews - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The 18th century British artist William Hogarth painted a series of eight pictures entitled "The rake's progress", which depict the progressive downfall of a wealthy and well-endowed young man. In turn he lost his first love, his reputation, his money, his self-respect, his liberty and finally his mind. As Gary Gilley deftly charts the `progress' of evangelicalism during the 20th century in his latest book, I couldn't avoid making comparisons.
Like the two previous volumes in his "This little church ..." series, "This little church had none" is a gracious but unflinching analysis of modern non-conformity in USA and elsewhere. Gilley is a master diagnostician of cultural trends. In Part 1 of this book he shows how churches that were once endowed with the "unsearchable riches of Christ" and rooted firmly in the Scriptures as the Word of God, became weary of biblical orthodoxy and set off in pursuit of new objectives such as popularity, numerical success, influence and acceptance by the world. Drifting away from their biblical roots, they embraced in turn a liberal modernity which sets human reason above revelation; a seeker-sensitivity that prioritizes man's felt needs; a mega-church mentality intoxicated by its own success; a prosperity gospel which deludes and disappoints its followers; a philosophical pragmatism that rewrites the church's theology; a postmodernism that denies absolute truth; and a new-age `ancient-future' spirituality which owes nothing to Scripture and everything to medieval mysticism. The "riches of wisdom and knowledge" that are found only in Christ have been squandered on an altar of ambition, indiscipline and self-indulgence.
It is a devastating critique, but this is no mere tirade against progress but a well-reasoned and well-documented analysis of trends that have left much of the Western church lost in a post-modern wilderness.
What is the answer? We must return, says Gilley, to the church's Scriptural foundations. As Isaiah puts it: "Listen to Me, you who follow after righteousness, You who seek the LORD: Look to the rock from which you were hewn, and to the hole of the pit from which you were dug. Look to Abraham your father, And to Sarah who bore you. For I called him alone and blessed him and increased him." We must return to the biblical roots of "the faith once delivered to the saints" in which the Bible is the lamp of our feet, Christ is the centre of our faith, and God is the focus of our worship. Thus in Part 2 ("The way back") and part 3 ("Evangelism") he urges "A renewed confidence in the Word of God", Bible-based shepherding and the power of a Christian worldview. Co-author Jay Wegter contributes a final chapter on "Recovering the neglected elements of the biblical gospel".
Commending the book, John MacArthur says it is "a desperately needed message for these uncertain times, written with clarity, spiritual wisdom, biblical precision and a passion that reflects the authors' own deep love for the truth". He is right.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Gary Gilley is one of the few voices that still preaches TRUTH! 30 May 2011
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
He does a great job articulating the current issues the "church" is facing today. I wish more would write like Gilley and not fear the reaction their harsh words will get from the media and other "Christian" authors. Rather, telling it like it is.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Great Book! 22 Feb 2013
By Randall J. Sortino - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is one that every pastor needs to read! Gary is right on target! I would encourage you to get the other two books in this series too!
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Great read 18 Oct 2013
By James Kahler - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you wonder what has happened to the so called church of today this will help you understand. Worth the money and the time to read it.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Spoke Truth 22 Aug 2013
By mary l stone - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very informative and correct on needing truth in today's churches. We have become a society that value things over relationships with people.
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