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This Last Night...In Sodom
 
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This Last Night...In Sodom

27 April 2005 | Format: MP3

£5.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £13.12 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
3:16
30
2
5:03
30
3
4:32
30
4
4:38
30
5
4:42
30
6
7:09
30
7
2:49
30
8
3:38
30
9
4:27
30
10
5:08
30
11
4:03
30
12
2:53
30
13
4:31
30
14
3:34
30
15
11:58
30
16
5:23
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Jan. 1998
  • Release Date: 27 April 2005
  • Label: Virgin EMI
  • Copyright: (C) 1998 Mercury Records Limited
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:17:44
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001KEHLX4
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 23,333 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Jason Parkes #1 HALL OF FAME on 19 Nov. 2005
Format: Audio CD
'This Last Night...in Sodom' was Soft Cell's messy adieu from 1984, the result of an announced 'retirement' following Marc Almond's meltdown which involved Marc & the Mambas, a whip and a music journalist. They'd stopped having hits (ironically with two great singles 'Where the Heart Is' & 'Numbers'), Dave Ball's 'In Strict Tempo' had him record with Genesis P-Orridge and Gavin Friday, while Almond's Mambas-material was set on auto-destruct ('Catch a Fallen Star', 'A Million Manias'). Soft Cell took to murdering Suicide's 'Ghost Rider' with Foetus' Jim Thirwell , as Almond was briefly in The Immaculate Consumptives (with Nick Cave, Lydia Lunch & Thirwell) as well as guesting on Psychic TV's 'Force the Hand of Chance' (on the fantastic 'Guiltless'). Soft Cell were anti-pop here; the reformed 21st Century version of SC returned to the classic pop of 'Non Stop Erotic Cabaret' and much of 'The Art of Falling Apart.'
Almond & Ball were apparently aiming for a blend of amphetamines & R'N'B, opener 'Mr Self Destruct' epitomises this approach with harmonica, dirty organ as Almond seems to invite self-destruction "shooting the 'A'" and all that. 'Slave to This'is very Throbbing Gristle/Psychic TV - a babble of Almond raps colliding with each other as Ball goes for an industrial sound.'Little Rough Rhinestone' meanwhile shows that Almond & Ball could still do pop if they wanted - which tracks like 'Surrender to a Stranger' & bonus-track 'Disease & Desire' similarly highlight.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Eleanor Morgan on 17 Oct. 2014
Format: Audio CD
One of Softcells best albums very dark i love it no-one comes near to Marcs voice he knows how to get the crowds and drawing them in at the same time mysterious to although poor Softcell have had some awful things said about them not true what you see is what you get they are the best electronic band of all time there will never ever be anyone like them again not in this life time they are so of there time and should be praised for all the hard work they put into what they do and been Last Night In Sodom i wouldnt mind the CD now i have the album i could play all day and play it Loud and be proud to be along and Massive Fan to And Of Marc Almond aswell they started with nothing remember that they have done fantastically very successful so i have nothing but admiration for them well done it gets my vote as do all there albums.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Joti Plahay on 10 Jun. 2000
Format: Audio CD
Soft Cell's fourth and last studio album, "This Last Night In Sodom" is the music that Ball and Almond wanted to make. This album reflects the results of much time spent by the band in the USA at the time and is a grittier more aggressive sound that is far removed from the pop of "Tainted Love". Choosing stand out tracks is diffcult as they are all good in their own way - "The Best Way To Kill" would be it at a push. If you've only ever heard Tainted Love, Bedsitter, Torch, etc. this will come as a real culture shock, but it reflects a period of unstability and confusion within the Almond/Ball combo which has manifested itself in a great album of angst and frustration. Fantastic, dark and moody.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Chris Millerchip on 9 July 2014
Format: Vinyl Verified Purchase
I have been trying for ages to get this album in vinyl. It is super.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Sordel TOP 500 REVIEWER on 11 Aug. 2006
Format: Audio CD
Soft Cell burnt fast and burnt bright. "Non-Stop Erotic Cabaret" was trashy & popular, "The Art of Falling Apart" was anxious and mature, "This Last Night ..." was a train wreck at full speed. The title track here ("Slave to This") is the sound of Marc Almond sticking up his middle finger to the mainstream for five minutes while partner Dave Ball pushes the envelope of synthesizer pop: it's a mess, and seemed almost unlistenable on release.

After a gap of over twenty years, however, the freshness and ambition of the album are strangely undimmed. Minor hit "Down in the Subway" has swagger and swing, while the Spanish stylings of "L'Esqualita" anticipate the genius of Marc's "Torment and Toreros" album of the same year. Most striking of all, however, is "Where Was Your Heart (When You Needed It Most)", a fierce climax in which the bedsit traumas of the duo's early singles are brought to a near operatic pitch.

Many bands go out on a whimper; Soft Cell went out on a magnesium flare of hatred and disdain that takes some beating. It's scarcely surprising that this album has not been rehabilitated by the wave of "Dadpop" nostalgia for the eighties.
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