This Is My Truth Tell Me Yours
 
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This Is My Truth Tell Me Yours

4 Nov 2002 | Format: MP3

£4.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
6:09
30
2
4:51
30
3
4:20
30
4
4:31
30
5
3:49
30
6
4:09
30
7
5:51
30
8
4:37
30
9
4:12
30
10
5:12
30
11
4:48
30
12
4:43
30
13
5:59


Product details

  • Label: Epic
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:03:11
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B002BAWLQI
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (57 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 13,901 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By "ravbains73" on 1 Mar 2005
Format: Audio CD
(I bought this album a long time ago, when it first came out with the limited edition embossed CD case -woohoo!)
Please ignore the overly negative 1 star reviews here, they are not in my opinion very balanced.
Okay, the manics started off as a brilliant young band, with the usual youthful nihilistic vision and associated political agenda. (Yes I thought Generation Terrorists was great, and still do!).
But this album sees the manics getting, alas older. The lyrics here are more reflective and there is a loss of innocence vibe pervasive in tracks like the Everlasting.
For me this is a pretty well balanced album, with a nice variety of tracks and tempo. From memory this album was recorded in the South of France, and there is a very french feel on some of the instrumentation on tracks like Born a Girl. For me very pleasing has a whole.
So please ignore the negative reviews here, all bands inevitably grow up, cannot remain young punks forever!! The important thing is that in maturing as people they continue to make great innovative music, rather than reverting to compromised dad-rock (like U2 for example!!!). This is definitely an innovative album both lyrically and musically.
So please just give it a fair audience and make up your own mind.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 5 Sep 2004
Format: Audio CD
Very much the black sheep of the Manic's family back catalogue, 'TIMT' has been rubbished by critics as a lazy stab at U2/R.E.M's respective crowns and vilified by fans who were still pining for The Holy Bible II. 'This Is My Truth..' therefore has received a lot of bad press for all the wrong reasons and whilst it is one of the weaker studio compositions, like all the Manic's albums, there are rays of light.
The album begins with the slow and smooth 'Everlasting', a sad lament to lost youth and a good live 'recovery' track having been up to your neck in elbows. 'Tolerate' will forever be misunderstood as an anti-war song; (Nicky is actually commenting on the bravery of the voluntary soldiers who went over there), and 'Stole The Sun' is pure Nirvana. A quiet, quiet, loud structure that has graced countless football highlights.
From here on, is the tale behind 'TIMT's faults. 'Ready For Drowning' lilts gently about welsh villages being flooded and would be far more enjoyable were it not for the fact that you are about to have this formula for the rest of the album. This is fine if you enjoy it, but for people who are excited by the sporadic schitzophrenia of the opening few tracks you are going to be disappointed. The songs stories continue to flow; 'My Little Empire' speaks about Nicky's self imposed bubble in a way 'Mr Carbohydrate' manages more bubbly, 'Born A Girl' 'skirts' around a man with a woman's mind (guess who) and 'Black Dog' talks about depression taking inspiration from a Churchillian metaphor. But whatever the meaningful lyrics, they are eventually lost in the dour dirge that overcomes the tracks, particularly between 'I'm Not Working' and 'Nobody Loved You'. You'd be hard pushed to hum any of the melodies absent-mindedly in a lift.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Mr. S. J. Jouanny on 18 Jan 2006
Format: Audio CD
The Manics are one of those bands that always seem in transition, moving from one stage to the next, like from their original glam-rock polished phase to their bleak hard-hitting indie on the Holy Bible, to anthemic heights and acceptance to here. Well here is hard to define, but the point is that the Manics are constantly searching and innovating. This is NOT the Manics that preached Marx, situationism and Lenin 7 years before this album, or being miserably bleak (though profoundly) 3 years before TIMTTMY. They've grown out of that, and they're musically more able than before, making them far more than a band with preachy wordsmiths (a common criticism levelled at the Manics).
On to the music, and the songs I think are interesting primarily for their musical content (a first for the Manics perhaps). There are some stunning moments on the album. The lack of tonality in "I'm Not Working" reflects the fear of flying that Wire was talking about. "Born A Girl" is a solemn chord progression, and it's all about restraint. The harmonies are wonderful and soaring, as on "Be Natural", and Bradfield sings eloquently on each song, stretching his vocal cords as far as they can go without sounding haggard, and the subject matter is becoming distinctly unManicy (eternity/phobias) but still Manicesque in parts (Spanish Civil War/Richey/Welsh history). A brave album.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 16 Feb 2006
Format: Audio CD
Contrary to popular opinion, the Manics' most successful album is also one of their finest and a very worthy addition to their canon. It saw the band building on Everything Must Go with a more diverse selection of songs incorporating string sections, piano, organ, cello and sitar, among various other instruments. Overfamiliarity may now burden singles such as 'If you Tolerate This Your Children Will Be Next' and 'You Stole the Sun from my Heart', but there are many more gems to unearth such as 'My Little Empire', which is as dark and disturbing as anything on The Holy Bible in terms of lyrical content, albeit in a palatable form. 'Black Dog on my Shoulder' and 'Ready for Drowning' are two stunningly observed compositions whose lyrics take on dual meanings, soundtracked by some of the most accomplished music the band produced. After this musical pinnacle, it is understandable that the band went in the opposite direction for 2001's raw follow up Know Your Enemy.
Despite its reputation as being too radio-friendly for its own good, this is an album layered with thoughtful introspection and a depressive, morbid air. A theme that cuts through the album is 'the void', a phrase that Nicky Wire uses on a number of songs, and the three remaining Manics filled the void left by missing member Richey Edwards with their most dignified and mature work, which in turn remained as passionate as anything that went before it.
Too often remembered as a time of bloated arena/stadium shows and multiple Brit awards, this album is the cause not the effect.
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