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This Is How You Lose Her Paperback – 5 Sep 2013


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Product details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber; Main edition (5 Sept. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0571294219
  • ISBN-13: 978-0571294213
  • Product Dimensions: 12.6 x 1.5 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 31,037 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

'An absolute treat slangily inventive, infectiously exuberant stories about love and infidelity among the Dominican-American community in New Jersey.' --Justine Jordan, The Guardian Books of the Year

'Díaz's impressive collection of short stories charts the end of love from first doubts, through the dreamlike state of splitting up, to the regret and suffering that follows. Centred around his frequent protagonist, Yunior, Díaz's stories portray love as both an all-encompassing force and a fatally compromised state.' --George Pendle, Financial Times Books of the Year --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Book Description

This Is How You Lose Her is a new collection from Junot Diaz - Pulitzer Prize winner and bestselling author of The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao - about the haunting, impossible power of love.

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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By M. G. Azevedo on 17 Sept. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you've read the other books by Junot Diaz - "Drown" and "Oscar Wao," you know what to expect: Diaz can really, really write.

This book is a interconnected collection of short stories, all but one about Yunior, the Dominican kid of his previous books, "Drown" and "Oscar Wao".

Through the stories we meet Yunior's family, his pain of losing his brother to cancer, his hopes and dreams even as he hopelessly screws them all up because Yunior can always find another way to lose his woman.

If you haven't read the other books, and you don't know Yunior, in the firts story "The Sun, The Moon, The Stars," he introduces himself : "I'm not a bad guy. I know how that sounds - defensive, unscrupulous - but it's true. I'm like everyone else - weak, full of mistakes, but basically good."

Yes, maybe Yunior is like everyone else, but Diaz certainly is not like everyone else: JUNOT DIAZ IS A WRITER.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Diana Foster on 29 Mar. 2013
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These stories are written in a wonderfully racy colloquial Spanglish. The writing is unique and intriguing, often excellent.

The book gives the reader a great insight into the life of the immigrant Dominican community to the USA. All of the stories - bar one - are about a teenage boy/man called Yunior. One can only assume that Yunior is the author Juniot Diaz himself, especially in the final story 'The Cheater's Guide to Love.'

My only criticsm is that beacuse they are all about the same character - Yunior - they tend to become somewhat tiresome if you try to read one directly after another. My advice would be to take a break between each story.

Overall, excellent.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By lene paulsen on 26 April 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Highly engaging, easy-to-read short stories from the Spanish speaking part of the US, the young ones who don't have much and know it. I especially like the stories about those who are new Americans, legal or not, and struggling to find a place of their own in this country. The stories are also about sex, relationships, family and growing - and though they stay very true to their particular "barrio" everybody can relate.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Consisting of nine short stories, all of which are about love, This is How You Lose Her describes whole worlds within the title itself. Four of the stories are named for the speaker's lovers, and all of them reflect the speaker's inability to experience love on a plane higher than that of the physical, which drives every aspect of his life. With Yunior, who appeared in Diaz's first story collection, Drown, and in The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, as a speaker in many of these stories, the narratives move back and forth in time, and for anyone who has read the biography of the author in Wikipedia or elsewhere, they become almost spooky in their closeness to the biography of the author himself.

Many settings parallel those in which Diaz himself lived, beginning with his initial arrival from the Dominican Republic with his mother and brother, and their stay in New Jersey with a father/husband they have not seen in five years. Later references place him in Brooklyn, at Rutgers, and finally in Cambridge and Boston where he is working for his PhD. The intense feelings aroused by these vividly described settings suggest that other aspects of Yunior's life may also parallel that of the author. As the speaker, be it Yunior (the author's apparent alter-ego) or some other character, moves from one unsuccessful relationship to another in these stories, the reader cannot help but feel sorry for the degree to which hopes are dashed and women are used (willingly in most cases) and later hurt as a result of the male character's insensitivity and ignorance of what he might have done wrong.
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By PP Prong on 3 Sept. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
'There are many formulas.' So goes a line from the narrator of a story about a guy trying to get over losing a woman who dumped him for his serial cheating. The self-obsessed, womanising, hard-thinking, hard working Dominican American male is what Diaz knows best, and this humorous, linguistically creative and tender collection of short stories explores some of his more defining predicaments. Maleness, womanhood, passion, longing and family loyalties are touchstones in all of these loosely linked stories, and the writing is quick and sharp and laced with vernacular. At times I may have felt slightly challenged by Diaz's choice of phraseology, but that made the book more interesting and is possibly its cutting edge. Diaz seems sometimes to be brazenly reclaiming, in a highly literate articulation of the language and cultural mores of a specific community group, a certain perception of women and the right to flaunt stereotype. Maybe, maybe not. But this is Pulitzer prose, and Diaz's unique formula wins again because it appears so casual, terse and effortless.

The unfortunate garish cover of this edition (it is such a monstrous design choice) hides a great little insight into the Dominican American world, one that is full of real colour and character. Stick it on your shelf.
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