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Thinking in Pictures: And Other Reports from My Life with Autism Hardcover – Nov 1995


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 222 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing Group; First Edition edition (Nov. 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385477929
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385477925
  • Product Dimensions: 3.2 x 17.1 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (43 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,088,894 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

'A mind-blowing book -- Newsday

‘A fascinating account of how her mind works in an entirely visual way’ -- Irish Times

‘Grandin has created a beautifully odd and fascinating picture of her life and mind, and her abiding love of animals’ -- Elle --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Publisher

Foreword by Oliver Sacks.

Temple Grandin was the subject of a BBC Horizon special, The Woman Who Thinks Like a Cow --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


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I THINK IN PICTURES. Read the first page
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4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Keith Appleyard VINE VOICE on 10 Jan. 2005
Format: Paperback
Whether or not you are familiar with Autism or Aspergers, I think it worthwhile reading Temple's earlier book first. This one is then written 10 years later, and based upon her successes and failures, she takes you through some of her thoughts and ideas.
The prevailing theme is that how she uses her experience and expertise at working with cattle (and other animals), understanding their basic fears, dislikes and preferences, and how this has given her an insight into the equivalent fears, dislikes and preferences of autistic people.
This animal-human empathy may seem weird to some, but it really does seem to come up with some rational ideas. For example autistic children don't like things that look out of place, just as cattle interpret a broken branch or disturbed earth as signs of a predator in the vicinity.
There is also some potentially useful discussion on the role of more modern drugs, such as clomipramine and fluoxetine.
Finally, to demonstrate that this is not just a 'light' book with a rudimentary index, we get a Bibliography, with nearly 200 references for further reading.
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59 of 61 people found the following review helpful By Mr. S. J. Wade on 19 Jan. 2008
Format: Paperback
This is a book about autism and the author's struggle for acceptance, education and fulfilment, as a world authority on the humane handling of livestock. As the title suggests, the book offers a fascinating insight into Grandin's idiosyncratic way of thinking, which is both enthralling and sometimes amusing. It might offer guidance for those attempting to manage autism and explanations as to what autism is for the curious. It explains how it affects the lives of those who are identified as autistic, from Kanner's to Asperger's. And, whether from the descriptions of the physiology of the condition or the biography, there emerges important philosophical questions about different ways of being in the world. It offers inspiration in the author's description of the way she manages her condition, and might offer others encouragement and inspiration in managing their own physiological or psychological disadvantage. Autism, it seems, covers a wide spectrum and it is very amusing, as you can't help noticing autistic traits, in the personalities of many so-called 'normal' people. It seems impossible not to conclude that the existance of autism is a precious gift for the progress and creativity of mankind, and from the perspective of an autistic person, normal society shows itself to be a very cruel and rejecting entity indeed. Grandin comes across as a very likeable and compassionate person and my admiration of her is unstinting. I am very glad that she took the trouble to write this book. I liked it very much.
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33 of 34 people found the following review helpful By carol vincent on 29 Aug. 2002
Format: Paperback
A really good insight into autism. This book captures you from the beginning and you feel that you can see into the world of the writer.
She helps 'normal' peolpe to understand some of the difficulties that autistic people have in communicating and understanding the world around them.
The writer proves how being autistic need not be a barrier in achieving in life.
An interesting account for all readers.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By John M. Ford TOP 500 REVIEWER on 11 Jun. 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
Temple Grandin grew up with Asperger's Syndrome before it was understood by anyone but a handful of researchers. She has turned her insights and special interest in animal science into a successful career designing livestock handling systems. She claims that the image-based thinking of the autism spectrum is similar to the language-free thought processes of animals. This insight leads to interesting conclusions about communication.

The book weaves together accounts of Grandin's life and the development of knowledge about autism. Its eleven chapters are organized by autism topics and cover visual thinking, diagnosis, sensory problems, emotion, developing talents, treatments, relationships, connecting with animals, animal thinking, autism and genius, and religion. Temple Grandin provides a clear, readable account of scientific findings supplemented by experiences from her life. This expanded version includes updated information about autism spectrum causes, diagnosis, and treatment that have become available since the book was originally published in 1996.

The author is candid about her life's hard-won lessons. She also shares the things which bring her the greatest satisfaction and what these insights may mean for others. A sample:

- Her innovative design of a "squeeze machine" to restrain cattle is based on how calming she found gentle pressure as a child.
- Temple visualized large transitions in her life as stepping through a doorway--and often found an actual doorway to step through and reduce the stress of change.
- One way to get a feel for visual, associational thinking is to play with the Google search engine for images.
- Autistic fixations are not always a problem; some people are able to channel them into successful careers.
Read more ›
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37 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Gareth Greenwood on 10 Jun. 2008
Format: Paperback
Having previously read Liane Holliday-Willey's "Pretending to be Normal", I bought Grandin's book when I saw it in my local bookshop. Her description of thinking in pictures has many resonances for me. I don't have AS or HFA but I do exhibit the Broad Autism Phenotype, which is enough in itself to cause some problems similar to those described by people with ASD.

Tiny things in the book were enormously helpful to me. At one point Grandin says that she finds books or films about relationships boring or confusing. In the TV documentary on her she said she would prefer to watch Wallace and Grommit. Ditto - and it was very cheering to find that I am not alone in that idiosyncrasy :-)

It's hard to convey just how helpful such biographies are to those of us who have struggled, even with the mildest manifestations of autism.
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