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Think Like Tiger: And Analysis of Tiger Woods' Mental Game Hardcover – Apr 2002

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 158 pages
  • Publisher: G P Putnam's Sons (April 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0399148434
  • ISBN-13: 978-0399148439
  • Product Dimensions: 14.7 x 1.9 x 22 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,537,976 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Synopsis

Reveals the secrets that Tiger Woods has learned from his family, fellow competitors, and teachers about the mental game of golf and demonstrates how to use these same tools and techniques to improve one's own game.

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Good advice from his parents, top teachers, and a prominent psychologist, plus learning from legendary professional golfers, educated Tiger on the value of mine control. Read the first page
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mary Whipple HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 14 Aug. 2003
Format: Hardcover
In his analysis of Tiger Woods's mental game, Andrisani points out the methods by which Tiger manages to keep focused on his game and block out distractions and negative thoughts. Visually programmed by his father so that his mental image of the perfect golf swing became part of his psyche as an infant, he doesn't have to think about what he's doing right or wrong with his own swing. Introduced to Buddhism by his mother when he was a small child, he knows how to meditate and relax. Taught by coaches how to focus on where he wants his shots to go, rather than what's going on with his swing or his score, he knows how to get into "the zone." And he may, according to Andrisani, employ a post-hypnotic code (through very slow eye-blinks) to keep himself from being distracted.
The book does not, however, give the reader a way to "learn the secrets of Tiger Woods's mental game and think your way to lower scores," as the jacket suggests. While Tiger's methods work for him, it's probably too late for the rest of us to learn and apply these methods, and the pointers about imagining where you want your shots to go and trying to relax are not new. Andrisani's admiration for Tiger and his "handlers" is overwhelming, and it's hard to take seriously the statement of his first teacher (after his father) that he felt "a little like a house painter being asked to redo the ceiling frescoes of the Sistine Chapel" when he was asked to help the eleven-year-old Tiger to improve. While the development of Tiger's mental game may, indeed, resemble "the forming of a diamond," and "the making of fine wine," some of us would be happy with cubic zirconia and plonk. Mary Whipple
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 7 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Well...maybe. 28 Mar. 2003
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Okay, let's think about this one. Is Tiger Woods the golfing machine that John Andrisani wants us to believe he is? Or is he human, at the pinnacle of his game and cruising? Golf is all about streaks. Think about Johnny Miller. At the top of his game everyone was saying that HE was the next Nicklaus. Then all of a sudden it was as though he had been abducted by aliens. Go, Tiger, go! But I won't be the least bit surprised when the streak ends and Tiger ends up stumping Mizuno or Maxfli or Golfsmith instead of Nike.
Well...maybe.
The book does bring to the table some very good things about the mind game of golf. Tiger aside, this book could have been just as good without Andrisani's overt Tiger Woods hero worship that literally drips from every page.
Go ahead and read it. Not too bad, really. Not too deep. Definitely not earth shattering.
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Think Before You Buy 22 Jun. 2002
By Brian McClafferty - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
All you need to know about this book is that there is a disclaimer on the back cover which tells you that Tiger Woods had nothing whatsoever to do with the creation of this book. I bought and read the book before I saw the disclaimer. Stupid me. Shame on me; much more shame on John Andrisani. You won't learn anything, or at least anything useful. Look into Manuel De La Torre or Dede Owens (especially "Smart Golf") to really improve your golf game.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
"By age four, nothing bothered him." 14 Aug. 2003
By Mary Whipple - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
In his analysis of Tiger Woods's mental game, Andrisani points out the methods by which Tiger manages to keep focused on his game and block out distractions and negative thoughts. Visually programmed by his father so that his mental image of the perfect golf swing became part of his psyche as an infant, he doesn't have to think about what he's doing right or wrong with his own swing. Introduced to Buddhism by his mother when he was a small child, he knows how to meditate and relax. Taught by coaches how to focus on where he wants his shots to go, rather than what's going on with his swing or his score, he knows how to get into "the zone." And he may, according to Andrisani, employ a post-hypnotic code (through very slow eye-blinks) to keep himself from being distracted.
The book does not, however, give the reader a way to "learn the secrets of Tiger Woods's mental game and think your way to lower scores," as the jacket suggests. While Tiger's methods work for him, it's probably too late for the rest of us to learn and apply these methods, and the pointers about imagining where you want your shots to go and trying to relax are not new. Andrisani's admiration for Tiger and his "handlers" is overwhelming, and it's hard to take seriously the statement of his first teacher (after his father) that he felt "a little like a house painter being asked to redo the ceiling frescoes of the Sistine Chapel" when he was asked to help the eleven-year-old Tiger to improve. While the development of Tiger's mental game may, indeed, resemble "the forming of a diamond," and "the making of fine wine," some of us would be happy with cubic zirconia and plonk. Mary Whipple
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
HERO WORSHIP OR GOLF INSTRUCTION? 27 Feb. 2004
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This one is one with which you have to read between the lines. Think like Tiger? Sure. Why not? Because there is to much more to the game than thinking through the game. Nicklaus, Watson, Palmer--even Tiger--have all spoken of the intuitive aspects of the game and how too much thinking can be the death of your next round.
John Andrisani, in his book THINK LIKE TIGER: AN ANALYSIS OF TIGER'S MENTAL GAME, wants us to believe that Tiger is a golf-a-matic, an android that has been programmed by thought and is constantly on autopilot. Yes, Tiger is one of the greatest thinkers in the game but he is still human as evidenced by his mediocre 2003 season. His strategies during that season were no different than in previous seasons but the results were.
So what happened? Golf, that's what happened. Golf is a streaky game. Think about David Duvall. He finally won a major and everyone said he was back. Then all of a sudden it was over. For now. That's golf and no one, not even Tiger, is above it.
Andrisani in THINK LIKE TIGER... seems to preach that somehow Tiger is above the game. Reading the book one would think that Andrisani is telling all the competition that they might as well accept second place because there is no way, really, to think like Tiger. So what does that say for the rest of us and why should we buy and read this book?
All is not lost with THINK LIKE TIGER... but you must be careful to see past Andrisani's all too apparent and excessive hero worship.
The book delineates some very good things about the mind game of golf. I would recommend that you read it. But don't expect a book that will shave strokes appreciably from your game.
THE HORSEMAN
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Not a Helpful Book 26 Jun. 2007
By Jeff Weisman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This is not a helpful book for anyone. The author uses Tiger Woods to sell this book but does not have any real information about Tiger Woods' mental game. He hasn't even interviewed him. I have substantial knowledge in sport psychology and do not think golfers or athletes will be benefitted in any way by reading the book.
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