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Things We Like (Remaster)

Things We Like (Remaster)

7 Apr 2003

£5.49 (VAT included if applicable)
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Jan 2003
  • Release Date: 1 Jan 2003
  • Label: Universal Music Group International
  • Copyright: (C) 2003 Polydor Ltd. (UK)
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 47:37
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001KWFLVU
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 31,921 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 11 April 2003
Format: Audio CD
The cd was not available for a long time. Now all of us are rewarded with bonus addition and perfect booklet. The added song Aging is worthwile. It is a band that combines 1968 skills of John McLaughlin (Tony Williams, Miles Davis super star) and Dick and Jon from Colosseum (at that time just after Graham Bond sessions and ahead of John Mayall Bare wires. The cd is some kind of freakout compared with "nice songs" of Jack or Cream, however it is a British jazz masterpiece of that time. It is a great musical feast.
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23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Mr P VINE VOICE on 10 Nov 2003
Format: Audio CD
The first thing Jack Bruce recorded in 1968 after Cream disbanded, although it was released after Songs For A Tailor.
Its purely an instrumental jazz album with Jack on upright acoustic bass. He is joined by Dick Heckstall Smith on saxes and Jon Hiseman on drums on all tracks and John McLaughlin on guitar on half. (Compare McLaughlins work here with that on his own superb album Extrapolation from 1969. It sounds like a completely different guitarist. Amazing!)
The music, apart from one track, is all based on tunes Jack penned when he was 12.
The blistering Over The Cliff gets things going followed by the awesome Statues, a ballad with a fast middle section. Hiseman's playing is so loose compared to his Colloseum work of that time. Fine arco from Jack too. It is all sensational playing. this is not Jack Bruce playing at playing jazz, its the real thing. This album can hold its own in most company.
Sam Enchanted Dick combines two tunes and introduces McLaughlins very pithy guitar and more swing than you can shake a stick at
Born To Be Blue is a Mel Torme/Robert Wells ballad. Big Dick gets centre stage and loads of feeling into this wafter with totally sympathetic work from his colleagues. HoHo Country Kicking Blues is a fine tune first coming to light when Jack was part of The Graham Bond Organisation. After the hugely enjoyable main theme it really crackles along, with fine solos from McLaughlin, Jack then Heckstall-Smith who goes for broke.
Ballad For Arthur is a so subtle masterpiece. The emotional interplay is at its height. Keening tenor, shimmering cymbals and plangent bass. It does not get a lot better than this. McLaughlin creeps in with some beautifully chosen phrases. This track is my highspot amongst many.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Numinous Ugo on 13 July 2009
Format: Audio CD
I loved Cream and knew that the magic ingredient was Jack Bruce. I remember getting the double LP Jack Bruce at His Best, which was part of a series with albums dedicated to Eric Clapton, Ginger Baker and a Cream best of all in white sleeves with psychedelic cartoon pictures of each of them on the cover. I remember that the sleeves opened at the top and had a flap over the opening. One song that jumped out at me was Hkhh Blues. I wondered where it came from and it was only later that I found this album.

This was Jack getting his bearings post Cream, recording tunes that he wrote as a schoolboy. Dick Heckstall Smith gets to stretch out on sax and Jon Hiseman plays mean drums in, what was not too far in conception from what Cream was doing but which stripped away the rock camouflage to reveal the free jazz that was there all the time.
The story of John McLaughlin's involvement is interesting. Jack was driving home one day when he saw John looking rather dispondent, he stopped and asked how things were. John had been asked to go over the America to join Tony Williams Lifetime but could not afford the ticket to get there, so Jack asked him to join his sessions to help him get there. McLaughlin went on to play a vital role in the sound of Miles Davis' In a Silent Way via Tony Williams which in turn lead to Mahavishnu Orchestra. This album and the meeting that lead to McLaughlin being invited to play on this album surely ranks as one of those pivotal moments. Whatever you call that blend of jazz and rock that arose out of the Miles Davis group.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Neil Mawer on 19 Feb 2014
Format: Audio CD
Recorded in August 1968, between the final Cream tours of the USA, this is the Jazz side of Jack Bruce that had only previously surfaced on the 1963 Graham Bond Quartet live at Klooks Kleek (again with McLaughlin on guitar) Heavily influenced by Charles Mingus (check out the bass solos) as were the horn arrangements on 1969s Songs for a Tailor, this was an important stepping board for John Mclaughlin, if only a sideshow in Jack's solo career.

The session enabled McLaughlin to buy the air ticket to the USA to meet Tony Williams and kick start his international career. Three other albums to consider in the same vein if you like this one are:-

EXTRAPOLATION - McLaughlin's debut with a very similar sax/bass/drums line up, but perhaps even better than Things We Like
THINGS WE LIKE (US MIX) - The original 1988 US Polydor issue (835 244-2) features a modern remix with stereo drums centre, bass left & sax right. This may be preferable for rock fans used to such a stereo presentation
THIS THAT - a 1994 album by Dick Heckstall-Smith, Jack Bruce and John Stevens on the German Atonal label. A belated follow up to Things We like, but even freer in jazz styling.

So one far from the mainstream of Jack & Pete Brown's songbased solo albums, but of interest to anyone liking the young turks of British free jazz in the sixties.
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