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Do They Hear You When You Cry Paperback – 4 Mar 1999

4.5 out of 5 stars 36 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 688 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam; New edition edition (4 Mar. 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553505637
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553505634
  • Product Dimensions: 10.9 x 3.6 x 17.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 812,913 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"A fascinating story...not only one of horror but of great humanity."--The New York Times Book Review "Told in Kassindja's voice, this memoir is also a precious lesson about cultures, women's human rights policy, and perhaps most important, faith in God and humanity. These elements, fluidly interwoven, create an incredible narrative." --The Washington Post "Moving and powerful."--Newsweek "An astonishing true story . . . A sprawling adventure . . . Full of good guys and bad guys, lush landscapes, barren prison cells, love, courage, despair, and cruelty."--The Philadelphia Inquirer "A straightforward, gripping narrative, not easily forgotten."--Essence

Book Description

The dramatic story of Fauziya Kassindja, who fled her African homeland to escape female genital mutilation and forced polygamy.

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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I bought this book in the UN shop, New York and did not put it down until I got on the plane back to the UK. The book draws you into a sense of what this poor girl went through and her strength and courage shines through immensely. It will make you laugh and cry and seriously consider your own life and you realize what you take for granted very quickly. It provides you with an insight into the injustice that is the asylum seeking process. Throughout the book, Fauziya remains to be careful of how she explains her detention by the US, she does not appear to be bitter or angry to those that caused her so much suffering which if I were to be in her shoes, I doubt that I would be so calm or understanding.
Fauziya arrived in the US with a fake passport after fleeing her tribe in Togo, Africa but immediately told the immigration she was seeking asylum and that the passport was not hers. The result of this honesty was further imprisonment and injustice. We are constantly informed by the media how people ‘flock to the UK’ trying to be granted asylum but we never stop to think of the stress and fear and uncertainty that these people suffer in the process. We consider the USA to be a country of free speech and of justice in comparison to where Fauziya came from but it is a shame that these principles were forgotten or perhaps ignored when Fauziya arrived but a blessing that the young Law student Layli Miller Bashir, and the team of lawyers that fought for her, came into her life.
I have never been touched so much by a book and I praise Fauziya for her faith and strength that got her through the worst journey I have ever heard. I too cried with her and laughed with her and if there is any chance of a follow-up book to tell everyone what she is doing then it needs to hurry up!
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Format: Paperback
I bought this book in the UN shop, New York and did not put it down until I got on the plane back to the UK. The book draws you into a sense of what this poor girl went through and her strength and courage shines through immensely. It will make you laugh and cry and seriously consider your own life and you realize what you take for granted very quickly. It provides you with an insight into the injustice that is the asylum seeking process. Throughout the book, Fauziya remains to be careful of how she explains her detention by the US, she does not appear to be bitter or angry to those that caused her so much suffering which if I were to be in her shoes, I doubt that I would be so calm or understanding.
Fauziya arrived in the US with a fake passport after fleeing her tribe in Togo, Africa but immediately told the immigration she was seeking asylum and that the passport was not hers. The result of this honesty was further imprisonment and injustice. We are constantly informed by the media how people ‘flock to the UK’ trying to be granted asylum but we never stop to think of the stress and fear and uncertainty that these people suffer in the process. We consider the USA to be a country of free speech and of justice in comparison to where Fauziya came from but it is a shame that these principles were forgotten or perhaps ignored when Fauziya arrived but a blessing that the young Law student Layli Miller Bashir, and the team of lawyers that fought for her, came into her life.
I have never been touched so much by a book and I praise Fauziya for her faith and strength that got her through the worst journey I have ever heard. I too cried with her and laughed with her and if there is any chance of a follow-up book to tell everyone what she is doing then it needs to hurry up! This is one of those rare books you read and never forget.
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Format: Paperback
Although the first part of the book is overly long, and quite naively written, Fauziya's background and upbringing is an important part of what follows. The treatment metered out to her Mother after her father dies, and Fauziya's realisation that a polygamous marriage, at the age of 17, is her future, and the requirement that she was to be "cut" as a precursor would panic any sane person into escaping from Togo, her homeland. Her appalling treatment at the hands of the US Immigration Service, when she applies for asylum, beggars belief! This book should have women all over the world, protesting this barbaric practise.
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Format: Paperback
Fauziya's story is, unfortunately, a common one in the US, an also here in England. Following the death of her beloved father, Fauziya's world crumbles when she is told that she is to be married off to a man thirty years her senior. Furthermore, she learns that she will have to undergo the barbaric practice of female genital mutilation (FGM). However she manages to escape and travels to the US to seek asylum. Unfortunatley, she is then imprisoned for being an illegal immigrant. The majority of the book recounts her experiences at the various prisons she was detained at over a period of some 18 months or so. This book is surely an indictment on a country that advocates "Justice" and "free libery"! The prisons are harsh places, often with only basic amenities, and people like Fauziya, whose only "crime" was to legitimately seek asylum, are treated worse than dogs. Surely as we are now in the new Millennium, we should be striving to abolish practices like FGM? A very moving and thought provoking read which I will never forget.
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