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There's No Such Thing as Chanukah Bush, Sandy Goldstein
 
 

There's No Such Thing as Chanukah Bush, Sandy Goldstein [Kindle Edition]

Susan Sussman , Charles Robinson
3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

Kindle Price: £1.91 includes VAT* & free wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet
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Product Description

Product Description

-Recommended by the National Conference of Christians and Jews....
-Nominated for the National Jewish Book Award for Children....

This perennial classic tells the tender story of a young Jewish girl at Christmastime. Robin loves Christmas trees but knows Jews do not celebrate Christmas. One day at school, another Jewish girl tells her about a wonderful new invention called a ‘Chanukah Bush.’ “It’s like a Christmas tree,” explains schoolmate Sandy Goldstein, “but it’s for Jews.” Robin rushes home to tell her family the great news.

The story unfolds in warm, loving chapters which examine the yearly “Christmas Dilemma” faced by many children in this country who are born to diverse cultures and beliefs. In CHANUKAH BUSH, Robin’s wise grandfather explains the difference between celebrating something you believe in, and helping friends celebrate something they believe in. “We honor our friends,” says Robin’s grandfather at book’s end, “when we share what is special in our lives with them.”

A tender and timely story, “Chanukah Bush” teaches children to take pride in their heritage, to honor the differences between cultures, and to share their traditions with others.

Recommended by the National Conference of Christians and Jews as a "...story promoting brotherhood and understanding," "THERE'S NO SUCH THING AS A CHANUKAH BUSH, SANDY GOLDSTEIN," is for every child who has ever felt different in our society.

[An EMMY-award winning film by the same name is available http://www.sisuent.com/i/4306/there-s-no-such-thing-as-chan-bush-sandy-goldstein.htm]

Booklist

Every Jewish child who has felt like a stranger in his own country at Christmastime will empathize with Robin’s situation. Sussman does a fine job of picking up nuances of predicaments, such as when Robin is unsure whether or not she should sing the words to certain Christmas carols.

New York Times

The book tells the story of a Jewish girl’s request for a Hanukkah bush. Although the child’s request is denied, her mother encourages her to invite a Christian friend over for a Hanukkah meal and allows her to attend the friend’s Christmas dinner.

Publisher's Weekly

Sussman's small narrtor Robin relates a tender story about ecumenical fellowship depicted attractively in Robinson's drawings.

B'Nai Brith International Jewish Monthly

THERE'S NO SUCH THING AS A CHANUKAH BUSH, SANDY GOLDSTEIN should be placed on every Jewish family's bookshelf. Susan Sussman's extremlely well-written fiction relates how a young Jewish girl finally learns to cope with that "Christmas time of year."

Los Angeles Jewish Journal

...a Jewish girl, tempted by the glitter and fun of Christmas, is helped by her grandfather to understand that while she can help her friends celebrate their holiday, it is not and cannot be hers. I admire this book both as a holiday guide and for dealing with Christmas in a straightforward manner.

The Boston Jewish Times

…as Jews, we can share holidays with friends-learn about each other’s customs without believing in each other’s religions. Grandpa explains, “There is a difference between celebrating something because you believe in it, and helping friends celebrate something because they believe in it.”

Jewish Heritage

"There’s No Such Thing as a Chanukah Bush, Sandy Goldstein goes to the heart of what it often feels like for children to be Jewish at Christmas time.”

School Library Journal

Sussman presents and resolves the dilemma of a Jewish child who is surrounded by Christmas celebrations. …pleasant, easy reading with realistic characters and plausible situations.

From the Author

"Chanukah Bush"--an almost-true story
When my little girl asked if she could have a "Chanukah Bush"--the very same question I'd asked my mother many years before--I knew I had to write this book.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 415 KB
  • Print Length: 48 pages
  • Publisher: Susan Sussman (8 Oct 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B009NR5KOC
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #453,799 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
3.8 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My daughters loved it 17 Dec 1998
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
There are so few books written and aimed at Jewish children this time of year, so it is a pleasure to find a good one. At the end of the year, it's not easy to explain why we don't have a Christmas tree. Another reviewer wrote that all the Jewish families they know have Christmas trees. I don't want to get into a debate, but in the interest of stating another side, some families observe both Chaunkah and Christmas and those families, I assume, would have a Christmas tree. But a Jewish family observing Chanukah, not Christmas, would have no reason to have a Christmas tree. The author shows how we can all help celebrate someone elses holiday. My daughters liked her story and so did I. It wasn't preachy or boring, but it was comforting.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Viewpoint of Heather's mother 16 April 1999
By A Customer
Format:Hardcover
Dear editors, I am writing re: my review of 1-25-99. There is a one-word error in the fifth line that changes the meaning entirely. It should read, ".....insight for NON Jewish adults...", not "insight for now Jewish adults." Would you kindly change this wording. As it reads now, it is misleading for your potential future customers, and embarrasing for me. (p.s. I actually AM Heather's mother. Susan Sussman wrote the book using our two daughters as the models for her characters Robin and Heather.)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect Touch for the Holidays 11 Dec 1998
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
A warm and touching story addressing the difficult topic of Jewish children coping with the Christmas-dominated holiday season.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not realistic 10 Nov 1998
By A Customer
Format:Hardcover
All the Jews I know have Christmas trees. They realize that Christmas is not solely a religious holiday but also a cultural, joyous time of year that everyone can enjoy.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.3 out of 5 stars  9 reviews
17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My daughters loved it 17 Dec 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
There are so few books written and aimed at Jewish children this time of year, so it is a pleasure to find a good one. At the end of the year, it's not easy to explain why we don't have a Christmas tree. Another reviewer wrote that all the Jewish families they know have Christmas trees. I don't want to get into a debate, but in the interest of stating another side, some families observe both Chaunkah and Christmas and those families, I assume, would have a Christmas tree. But a Jewish family observing Chanukah, not Christmas, would have no reason to have a Christmas tree. The author shows how we can all help celebrate someone elses holiday. My daughters liked her story and so did I. It wasn't preachy or boring, but it was comforting.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not just for girls 25 May 2002
By Alyssa A. Lappen - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
"Do you have your tree yet," Heather asked Robin. "There it was! That question. Only this time it was worse, because of what Sandy Goldstein had done." Sandy's family had put up a Christmas tree and called it a Chanukah bush.

This nub of the first pages in this 9-chapter, 48-page easy reader captures the conflicted feelings of Robin, the main Jewish character whose best friend Heather was Christian. Heather naturally wanted Robin to share the joy of Christmas. Robin wanted to share it too. But of course, being Jewish, her family did not have a Christmas tree, and she had to tell her friend, "There is no such thing as a Chanukah bush."

Things got worse in school, when Robin's teacher directed the children to construct holiday decorations and Sandy Goldstein sat next to Robin, making the ugliest paper chains she had ever seen. Then all the other children started talking about their tree decorations and Santa Claus. Robin felt so, so, left out.

At home, Robin had a conversation with her mother about different ways of being Jewish. Robin's mother finished by saying that if Sandy Goldstein's family had a Christmas tree that was their business, but she would not have one in her house. They lit Chanukah candles.

Then Robin's Grandpa entered. His union was holding a Christmas party and he wanted Robin to go. The story travels through another five chapters and 28 pages before the girls reach an understanding about one another and their holidays. And that understanding is truly magnificent.

This book shows children the respect that they can and should have for others of varied faiths. Children (and people) can be different, but nevertheless help and love one another, deeply.

And PS, this book is not just for girls. Our copy was a gift from a relative whose son loved the story too.

--- Alyssa A. Lappen
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Universal Message 6 Feb 2004
By MZ - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
This book contains a universal theme that left me saying, "That's me." I was the odd one out. We've all been there at some point, and this book is outstanding. I also feel like it's a great way for kids outside of the Jewish faith to get that small perspective of what it is like for a Jewish child at Christmastime. It's one of those books that I remember fondly and remember well, even though I haven't read it in twenty years.
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars i still remember it well 1 Dec 2002
By Rachel'sFriend - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
As a Christian who's best friend was Jewish in elementary school (and to this very day) the two of us found this story to be such an entertainment that we joke about it to this very day, some nearly twenty years later. It helped to bridge a gap in understanding about what Hanukkah means to the faithful, and even now I fondly remember feeling so special being the one Christian invited to light the candles and "tell the story of God and His glory and how precious freedom was won." Even now, I tell people I was raised by a Jewish mother too, with much pride, and look forward to the festival of lights year after year.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect Touch for the Holidays 11 Dec 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
A warm and touching story addressing the difficult topic of Jewish children coping with the Christmas-dominated holiday season.
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