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There's No Such Thing as: Discover the One Rule for Making the Right Decisions Hardcover – 12 Aug 2003


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 164 pages
  • Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton (12 Aug. 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0446532290
  • ISBN-13: 978-0446532297
  • Product Dimensions: 13.3 x 1.6 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 659,019 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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'If you want to go places you've never been before, you have to think in ways you've never been before, you have to think in ways you've never thought before. This book will teach you how to do that.' - Ken Blanchard, co-author THE ONE-MINUTE MANAGER

Book Description

* Bestselling author and expert on leadership, John C Maxwell shares the only rule that matters - in business and in life!

Inside This Book (Learn More)
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ON NOVEMBER 8, 2001, PEOPLE WERE SHOCKED WHEN one of the hottest companies of the booming nineties, Enron, admitted to using accounting practices that had inflated its income figures by $586 million over a four-year period. Read the first page
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 2 May 2004
Format: Hardcover
In the aftermath of the many corporate scandals of the last two years, most people are looking for a way to reintroduce ethics into the companies they work for and invest in. In the process, some enthusiasts for ethical behavior have created whole libraries of do's and don'ts that tend to confuse the issue. What's the answer?
Dr. John C. Maxwell proposes a simple idea: Ethics is the same for all parts of one's life, whether in business or personal activities. "Asking the question 'How would I like to be treated in this situation?' is an integrity guideline for any situation." He builds on that standard to suggest an even higher one, something he calls "developing the Midas Touch." Your goal is to exceed the Golden Rule:
1. Treat people better than they treat you.
2. Walk the second mile (do more than just going the extra mile).
3. Help people who can't help you.
4. Do right when it is natural to do wrong.
5. Keep your promises even when it hurts.
If we all did this, our world would be filled with an abundance of kindness and goodness that would enrich each of us much more than any material possessions could.
Although I was certainly familiar with the Golden Rule, my understanding of it deepened greatly from reading this book. As an example, I think about the rule as "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you." That gets me to thinking about what I am going to do to them before I think about what I would want in that situation. Dr. Maxwell's rephrasing gets me to thinking about what the ideal thing is to do before I consider the other person. That improved my ability to think of good solutions even though the concept is unchanged by the rephrasing.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

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29 of 31 people found the following review helpful
The Golden Rule Explained and Improved Upon 29 July 2003
By Donald Mitchell - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
In the aftermath of the many corporate scandals of the last two years, most people are looking for a way to reintroduce ethics into the companies they work for and invest in. In the process, some enthusiasts for ethical behavior have created whole libraries of do's and don'ts that tend to confuse the issue. What's the answer?
Dr. John C. Maxwell proposes a simple idea: Ethics is the same for all parts of one's life, whether in business or personal activities. "Asking the question 'How would I like to be treated in this situation?' is an integrity guideline for any situation." He builds on that standard to suggest an even higher one, something he calls "developing the Midas Touch." Your goal is to exceed the Golden Rule:
1. Treat people better than they treat you.
2. Walk the second mile (do more than just going the extra mile).
3. Help people who can't help you.
4. Do right when it is natural to do wrong.
5. Keep your promises even when it hurts.
If we all did this, our world would be filled with an abundance of kindness and goodness that would enrich each of us much more than any material possessions could.
Although I was certainly familiar with the Golden Rule, my understanding of it deepened greatly from reading this book. As an example, I think about the rule as "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you." That gets me to thinking about what I am going to do to them before I think about what I would want in that situation. Dr. Maxwell's rephrasing gets me to thinking about what the ideal thing is to do before I consider the other person. That improved my ability to think of good solutions even though the concept is unchanged by the rephrasing.
He also addresses the fact that most people cut corners in an ethical sense, but are very critical of others who do. So there is some hypocritical thinking to address in this area.
Each chapter has questions at the end that readers can use to explore and develop their own thinking. I thought these questions were the most valuable parts of the book, and helped bring the lessons home to me.
I was also impressed to see the research about how the major religions all have their version of the Golden Rule, so this is something that almost everyone believes in.
But, most of us could use some more help to understand what others would like to see us do. The book has many fine sections that talk about the values that people would like to see honored in following the Golden Rule.
The book is also filled with simple business examples that were new to me. One of my favorites is the firm that keeps full employment by eliminating the owner's salaries when times are tough.
You could improve your understanding of ethical behavior over a lifetime by considering and reconsidering this fine book. What are you waiting for?
15 of 18 people found the following review helpful
A Must Read For Corporate America! 7 Aug. 2003
By Richard K. Biggs - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
With so many scandals rocketing corporate America in the past few years, the timing of this book couldn't be better. Every worker should read "There's No Such Thing As 'Business' Ethics."
Using the time-tested Golden Rule, John Maxwell dispels the myth of business ethics by stating that only people can be ethical--and we must do so in all areas of our lives because integrity demands consistent behavior. In short, character counts!
The author identifies the five most common resons why people compromise their ethics: pressure, pleasure, power, pride, and priorities. And in Chapter 6, we're told how to seize our golden opportunity by changing ourselves. "If you want to be able to pursue golden opportunities," Maxwell says, "then pursue the development of strong character first."
This small book (only 124 pages) is easy to read and includes some dynamic discussion questions at the end of each chapter. But don't let the size of this powerful resource keep you from overlooking the big message that's contained within: "You can go for the gold, or you can go for the Golden Rule. Those who go for the Golden Rule not only have a chance to achieve monetary wealth, but also to receive other benefits that money can't buy. People who live by the Golden Rule give themselves a chance to have it all!"
This book is destined for the best-seller list. I like it so much I'm adding it to the recommending reading list of my comprehensive mentor program licensed to Fortune 500 companies and government agencies. Thank you, John, for telling it like it is--and, more important, for leading by example.
13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
A Good Reminder 4 Dec. 2003
By A. Hennessey - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio Cassette
Being in sales I have noticed something over the years. Some of the great sales training programs and literature always seem to stress integrity. For example, "Always follow up when you say you will." However, they also advocate all sorts of little white lies in dealing with customers and prospects in order to get your foot in the door. This is exactly the kind of "ethics" that John Maxwell is taking on in this book.
It is refreshing to have Maxwell remind us that integrity goes much deeper than what is legal. His thesis is that a form of the Golden Rule, (Do unto to others, as you would have them do unto you,) is the only way to make tough, ethical decisions in any area of your life.
One of the problems I had was that the book really is geared towards leaders of companies, and doesn't address what you are to do if you are caught in a situation where you really don't have any power over the decisions of the company, but you are forced to execute those decisions, even if they are unethical. He praises whistle-blowers, but he doesn't seem to openly advocate the practice.
To his credit, Maxwell does state that using the Golden Rule will not always bring you success, but he states it as a kind of afterthought. His example of a high school football coach benching his players for underage drinking and then losing the big game because of their absence is hard to apply to a real life busniness situation. Having a tough sales deal on the line that can make or break the company and mean that you or people you work with or work under will lose their jobs, or their bonuses can be a little more stressful and make white lies, (especially when they are advocated by the higher-ups,) seem more inconsequential. And please understand that I am not saying that it makes them more right.
Like most of Maxwell's books it lays out some great food for thought and it really will help you to think about your actions and how you conduct yourself. However, also like Maxwell's other books, it doesn't give you a clear roadmap of how to succeed in this area.
22 of 33 people found the following review helpful
Save your money and go practice the Golden Rule 10 May 2006
By John Allain - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This more I think about this book, the more thought provoking it becomes. First, I find it amazing that anyone could take a belief that's widely known (practically a cliche), add nothing of substance to it, and actually write a book about it. Second, I find it even more amazing that it took 134 pages to make the Golden Rule applicable to business. Third, and perhaps the most amazing of all, is the fact that I actually spent my own hard earned money on this book. What amazing insights did I think would be uncovered?

I'll save you $9.72 (+s/h) and the 45 minutes it'll take you to read this. Here goes... Unless you were raised by wolves, it's pretty likely you've heard of the Golden Rule. Ok, now think about how this rule can be applied to all of your business dealings. That's it - you got it!

Whew! Now that you have an extra $9.72 in your pocket and 45 minutes of free time, go practice that Golden Rule by treating your kids/grandkids/neighbors to some ice cream.
Good Title By John Maxwell 12 Dec. 2009
By Michael Taylor - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Some readers may find "There Is No Such Thing As Business Ethics" a bit simplistic. Personally, I find that I need to be occasionally reminded that the bottom line profit margin is not necessarily the bottom line if you have to steal, cheat, lie, and abuse people along the way. Indeed, many revelations have come out the past several years of business leaders, politicians, athletes, and other people who have compromised integrity on the altar of success.

Among the important points covered by Maxwell include:

1. 3 reasons we make unethical choices.
2. Shortcuts seldom pay off in the long run.
3. 6 ways people want to be treated.
4. 5 factors in compromising ethics.
5. 5 ways to invest in people.
6. Comparison of people who "go for the gold" and people who "go for the Golden Rule".
7. 4 ways to apply the Golden Rule.

Again, some readers may find Maxwell's book naive and simplistic and out of touch with reality.

If so, consider this:

1. Eventually, the unethical will be caught.
2. We are all accountable to God (I can see now that some folks really have a problem with that statement!).

Read, enjoy, and practice the Golden Rule.

Recommended.
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