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There Is No Dog Paperback – 3 May 2012

11 customer reviews

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There Is No Dog + Just in Case + How I Live Now
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Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin (3 May 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141327170
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141327174
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1.6 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 362,245 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

My top choice for summer, it's an astounding crossover novel (The Times)

One must simply revel in the joyful singularity of Rosoff's latest masterpiece (The Guardian)

Genius! (Anthony Horowitz)

About the Author

Meg Rosoff became a publishing sensation with her first novel, How I Live Now, which won the Guardian Children's Fiction Prize and the Branford Boase Award. Her second novel, Just in Case, won the Carnegie Medal in 2007 and What I Was, her third novel, was shortlisted for the Carnegie Medal and was highly acclaimed. Meg lives in London with her husband and daughter.

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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Wendy Wynde on 29 Aug. 2012
Format: Paperback
Just read There is no Dog - and I couldn't put it down. It's laugh out loud funny, with a great story and highly original.
Bob (God) is beautifully written - anyone who knows teenage boys will 'get' him straightaway. And I love the handling of the whole concept of creation and how it's not actually that clever, apart from a few flashes of inspirational genius.
Never read anything like this before - don't suppose there is anything out there to equal it anyway. I wouldn't hesitate to recommend it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Book Blog Bird on 24 Jun. 2015
Format: Paperback
I picked There Is No Dog up as part of a recent library haul because it looked amusing and irreverent, which are two qualities I admire greatly in books. I’ve just finished it and I’m not really sure what to make of it. It’s either a work of such staggering philosophical and existential brilliance that it would take a lifetime to fully comprehend, or it’s a vaguely unsatisfying paranormal romance. I’m not sure which.

The premise is that God is a nineteen-year-old boy called Bob. Bob’s mother won Earth in a divine poker game and gave it to Bob to give him something to do. Sadly for Earth, Bob is feckless, lazy, whiny and irresponsible, spending most of his time as a sort of deified Kevin the Teenager, complaining about how unfair everything is and obsessing about sex. Luckily for the Earth, Bob has a sidekick, Mr B, a sort of deity-personal-assistant, who sorts out as many prayers as he can while Bob goes around trying to have sex with all the women he created. But when Bob meets Lucy, a pretty, virginal zoo assistant, however, he is determined that she is the girl for him and won’t stop until she agrees to be his.

There Is No Dog is part thought experiment, part fantasy/paranormal romance and raised and answered some interesting questions. Meg Rosoff’s writing is really very good and her descriptions and dialogue are spot on.

Bob started off as quite a funny character. He didn’t really seem nineteen years old to me; more like thirteen, and a pretty spoilt, nasty thirteen at that. His one redeeming feature (and there really is only one) is his brilliant imagination and creativity and I was willing to go with this, but unfortunately over the course of the book Bob didn’t grow or change at all and by the end of the book I just wanted to punch him.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By 1 on 24 Jun. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I enjoyed reading this book a lot. I couldn't put it down until I read the whole thing. It was funny, original, serious and a whole other lot of other mixed emotions. The book seemed to feel whatever a reader would feel at that moment. It was unexpected in every way, but there was something missing...maybe it was a little bit disappointing as to how the story ended, but great book overall! I would recommend this book to most teenage boys out there. "There is No Dog" was a truly captivating story! What was also captivating was the hidden meaning to it, which might be the whole idea for this book, in a good way. Such a good book, that all who have the opportunity should take their time and go on to read it!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Meg Rosoff just has to be the only current writer who can produce novels that will entertain, challenge & wow teenagers. I taught 'How I Live Now' to a group of resistant readers 3 years ago and have done every year since - each group has loved it, but 'There Is No Dog' is even better. The kids I've taught it to this year have loved the quirky way that the characters think like they do - Meg Rosoff manages to step into a teenage mindset with a random originality that is never patronising and always thought-provoking. Gentle irony and subtle humour let us share the unthinkable and reach beyond the confines of convention. It is an adult book without any self-indulgence or ego, which makes teenagers happy to access it - the freshness of the narrative voice, the courage of tricky subject matter and an unlikely optimism given the gravitas of the underlying messages Meg exposes make this totally unmissable. It should be on everyone's shelves - old and young (but not too young) because this is a classic of the future. Top dog!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Miss E. Potten on 13 July 2012
Format: Paperback
This book has such a fantastic concept that I couldn't resist picking it up. First, imagine that there is a God (if you're already a believer, bear with me). Now imagine that God isn't a bearded, wise blend of Gandalf and Santa, but a horny, arrogant, lazy and all-round typical teenage boy. If your reaction is 'OMG, Meg Rosoff is going to HELL. So is everyone who reads her filth, the blasphemous heathens!' then this isn't going to be the book for you. If your reaction is 'OMG, Meg Rosoff is clearly a genius, tell me more!' then read on!

On the surface of things, this is a novel about a boy called Bob. Bob is the God of Earth - and he's rubbish at it. He spends more time sleeping and fantasizing about naked women than he does caring about his creations. That job falls to his manager, Mr B, who has spent the last few millennia trying and failing to persuade Bob to accept some responsibility while he wades through paperwork and prayers from dawn until dusk. Meanwhile Bob's errant mother Mona has gambled away his pet Eck, Eck is contemplating death as he faces being cooked and served up with peppercorn sauce by his new owner, and Bob is falling madly in love with an assistant zookeeper called Lucy. His ardent desire for her could be the end of the world as we know it - but will he come to his senses in time to undo the chaos he has unleashed?

Although the book started off a bit slowly, by the end I was really glad I'd persevered. I think the lack of a really relatable and likeable leading character made things harder - every single character is deeply flawed and Bob, in particular, makes me feel glad I never had a teenage brother to put up with!
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