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Breaks down the theories of the major thinkers around childhood into easily digested concepts for those struggling to get to grips with educational psychology. Alfred Adler's work is also prescient when reading this and having a look at "Social Interest" will add value to understanding why early childhood and play is important in developing a psychologically healthy adult.

Those who were not allowed to play as children, later as Erikson details, become stuck within a life stage. Vygotsky looks at the role of language and proximal zones to encouraging children to move from being stuck to engaging with learning, seeing peer groups as important as a teacher. This chimes with the later work of Stack Sullivan and the adolescent chum. Montessori is the key to thinking about how schools become psychologically friendly instead of austere to young children and Dewey was the first to think about children as human beings. The Macmillan sisters were also key and the later work which took place in Italy is also crucial to a well rounded understanding of how human beings come forward.

Carol has written a book in an easily accessible style which operates as a benchmark for understanding these crucial concepts.
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on 10 August 2015
This book was on my recommended reading list for university. It has helped me through assignments and had some really interesting information of each of the Early Years theorists. I would recommend this book to anyone studying Primary Education, especially those who specialise in Early Years. It is an almost quick start guide to theorists, with just enough information to understand the theory. This book does not go into depth with each theorist, so you would need to do more research on top of this book. However, it is a good starting point.
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on 21 December 2015
Great to read but doesn't include all the stages of development for the theorists (only goes up to about 10 years old) so ideal for anyone doing early years but not so good for older children's theory.
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on 5 September 2014
I've just started a PGDE in Primary Education and this was a suggested read prior to the course, it's easy to read and follow. The book was in an excellent condition.
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on 25 December 2013
This book is an extremely valuable addition to my research for related uni studies. Written in an academic style that is still understandable and easy to read.
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on 19 February 2016
Has some useful information to use alongside uni assignment
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on 11 April 2016
Really like this book.
It is written in a way which is easy to understand, and gives clear meaning to the different theories.
Wouldn't be with out it.
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on 12 December 2014
Currently doing my FD and found this book to be amazing in regards to my current psychology module. Did take a while to arrive though, but worth the wait.
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on 16 March 2014
This book is brilliant is you are doing the early years foundation degree, tells you all you need to know about learning theorists!
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on 28 November 2013
Able to find a book that covers theorists which link to our code of practice. Recommended for level 4 students
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