Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

The secret war against Hitler Unknown Binding – 1987


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
Currently unavailable. We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.


Product details


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on Amazon.co.uk.
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5 reviews
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
very technical 26 Jan 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
the idea for the book is excellent, a version of secret history from one who was there. I am very interested in WWII era so I looked forward to reading the book. Became bored half way through aa I thought the book would be more designed to be on the exciting side of espionage. Found it too overwhelming with the political problems and underwhelming in the telling of the work done by the agents in enemy territory. Of course, he wasn't behind the lines himself so perhaps my original thought of new stories about the OSS was out of line. From Casey's viewpoint, the book was interesting, but not compelling.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Behind the scenes of the O.S.S. 22 Jan 2011
By ThorBjorn - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
William Casey was a junior Naval officer when he entered the Intelligence profession. In this retrospective, Casey recalls his experiences with the O.S.S. and its close cooperation with Britain's S.O.E. Casey worked directly under "Wild Bill" Donovan, who made the O.S.S. into the signifigant organization that it was during World War II.

Among the various interesting points illustrated within:
-William Donovan's struggle with the Washington bureaucracy, particularly J. Edgar Hoover and the F.B.I.
-The efforts to gain acceptance from the S.O.E., who were not keen on working with such a new-comer to intelligence operations.
-The U.S. and Britain shared a mutual mistrust of the French, and questioned their reliability: Charles DeGaulle was not invited to the D-Day invasion meetings; The Allies were reluctant to send arms to the various French resistance groups, as it was believed they would use the weapons on each other to settle political rivalries; Some French industies refused to sabotage their own factories that were producing materials for the Nazi occupation forces.
-The plot to assassinate Hitler was well-known to all the generals in the Wehrmacht, ...but as the Nazi party was not popular with the German military, ...no one reported it!
-An S.S. general defected to the allies!
-The war in Europe could have been ended early, if a truce was made with the Wehrmacht, ...but certain Allied politicians were bent on punishing and destroying Germany: several million more lives were lost.
-The Allies betrayed the Poles, allowing them to be enslaved by the Soviets.
-Enormous numbers of Russian refugees attempting to flee the Soviet Union, ...were sent right back to Stalin.
-Vast hoardes of German P.O.W.s were allowed to be used as slave-labor in the Soviet Union. Most of them were worked to death.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
A better title would have been British spy vs. American spy 1 May 2002
By JOHN GODFREY - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio Cassette
The British secret service was the best in the world, in experience, technology & contacts. When America entered the war,they had to share & they didn't like it one bit. They looked with distain & mistrust at the fledgling American intelligence efforts. They obstructed, were in flexible & fought for every inch of turf. The Yanks & the Brits both mistrusted the French. That & lots of names was the first half of the book (audiotape). Frankly a little boring.
The book picks up as Mr. Casey gets a little autobiographical with his actual involvement in 1943. What the Americans brought to the table was economic intelligence such as the cost benefit of strategic vs tactical operations, air vs ground activities etc. This type of intelligence was apparently unknown to the British. Mr. Casey discusses the opposition, even in Germany & the military to Hitler & the Nazis It was considerable. He evaluates the resistance groups in the occupied countries.
The result is an entertaining, informative & inside look at Allied espionage in World War II.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Military Intelligence is all too often not know by readers 13 Feb 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
To fully appreciate this type of book the reader should be aware of the other books relating to ULTRA and MAGIC. With these three in mind the reader should see the virtually unknown aspect of major wars. Many an unsung hero is overlooked since Military Intelligence and covert activities requires that the folks involved be hiddden. Casey adds another dimension to the constantly unfolding aspects of WW II as well as possible aspects of all future conflicts. The examples of Polish and French covert activities is not well known. The final item to consider when reading these types of books is which commanders did and did not use this wealth on information while preparinbg for battle o while in battle. As an example, did MacArthur have intelligencee before he invaded Inchon in Korea??? Did he have inntelligence before he raced to the yalu River claiming that the Chinese would not get involve? or, did he chose to ignore this intelligence? What did Westmoreland know or not know about the War in Vietnam?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
very technical 26 Jan 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
the idea for the book is excellent, a version of secret history from one who was there. I am very interested in WWII era so I looked forward to reading the book. Became bored half way through aa I thought the book would be more designed to be on the exciting side of espionage. Found it too overwhelming with the political problems and underwhelming in the telling of the work done by the agents in enemy territory. Of course, he wasn't behind the lines himself so perhaps my original thought of new stories about the OSS was out of line. From Casey's viewpoint, the book was interesting, but not compelling.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know

Look for similar items by category


Feedback