The Continuum Concept (Arkana) and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

The continuum concept Unknown Binding – 1977


See all 13 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£4.51
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"


Product details

  • Unknown Binding: 177 pages
  • Publisher: Knopf; 1st American ed edition (1977)
  • ASIN: B0006CTR8S
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (89 customer reviews)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

52 of 52 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 26 April 1999
Format: Paperback
My husband and I read this book 9 years ago, before the birth of our son, and it spoke to our hearts. Employing the simple idea that a baby who starts life in the womb shouldn't be abruptly separated from the mother after birth, we maintained almost constant contact with him for the first few months. I was amazed at some of the resistance, resentment, even hostility, people sometimes demonstrated when informed that we slept with our newborn and never left him to cry. All their protests were based on nothing but groundless fears -- "You'll roll over and smother him! You'll 'spoil' him!" Etc. Well, he became naturally more and more independent and separate at his own pace, not an arbitrarily imposed one (that's the "continuum" part), and weaned himself from the breast at 11 months, rather than at a time decided by the "experts" or demands of employment. He is now 9 years old, and is a wonderful, happy, secure, well-adjusted boy, and I never cease getting compliments from everyone who meets him on how considerate, engaging, empathetic, kind, and well socialized he is. I credit Liedloff's book for all of this. If I could give one message to all would-be parents, I would say: Don't buy into the lie that material things are what's important to provide your child, and if you yourself are so wrapped up in financial gain that you won't temporarily sacrifice it to bond with him the first year of life, you're selling yourselves short. Invest the first 6 months to 1 year of his life raising him in your arms, and you will be giving him, and yourself, more than a billion dollars could ever buy.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
67 of 69 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 9 Aug 2001
Format: Paperback
Having spent the past year battling with contemporary opinion that babies need "controlled crying" and will be spoiled by "too much attention", it was wonderful to read that the constant carrying and cuddling I gave to my son was in fact what all babies need to thrive. Liedloff's decriptions of the South American people she stays with are fascinating, and the attitude towards childcare refreshing. The only down side is that some of the language and attitudes are dated ("civilised" and "savages") and perhaps she takes the point a little too far into variations of adult behaviour. Having said that - this book should be read by anyone contemplating parenthood!
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
95 of 104 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 12 Mar 2006
Format: Paperback
I read this book when my children were five and two, I wish I had read it when pregnant for the first time. Then maybe I wouldn't have suffered with chronic PND for eighteen months after the birth of my first child. I would've listened to my instincts, believed in myself and in evolution and not listened to such tyrants as Gina Ford with their strategies and baby boot camp training. Anyone would think that babies were an alien race trying to ruin our lives instead of the pure and innocent vulnerable babies that they have been since time began. Thank you Ms Leidloff for changing my life for the better. READ THIS BOOK and bin all the parent centred rubbish that fills the shelves.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By inch worm on 24 Nov 2009
Format: Paperback
How I wish I had read this before I had my own child. I would unquestionably have tried out these revolutionary ap proaches. This is a book that every couple who is about to have a baby should read. Don't delay because it makes so much sense. I was able to lend a copy to a close friend just after she had given birth to her first child and she followed the advice in this book very carefully with highly benefical results. She has two children, a girl and a boy, both brought up with Liedloff's methods and they rarely cried, are very independent, confident and happy children. It goes to show that mother's down the ages don't necessarily know best!!!!!Liedloff has handed us the key to living in closer harmony with our children. Take them everywhere, let them feel when they are babies the warmth of their parents, the movement of being in the arms of their parents when they are walking, the confidence of knowing mum or dad is always around, sleep with them, cuddle them. Living in Italy as I do it is great to go out to restaurants at night and see the children all running round, not tucked up in boring old bed, but allowed to drop off when they want, secure in the knowledge that they are loved, wanted no matter where, no matter how because mum or dad's arms are only a few steps away.Let's break the conditioned mould and rethink all the ridiculous ways in which we have isolated our children in the past.Read Liedloff and it will change those old taboos for ever.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
70 of 78 people found the following review helpful By fionawallace@moadal.co.uk on 13 July 2001
Format: Paperback
I read this book after reading 'Three in a bed' by Deborah Jackson, which I thoroughly enjoyed and found to be useful, sensible and well-informed. Yes, the core concept rings true...and it has certainly worked for my baby, but as other people have said here, flexibility is so important, and no, we don't live in the jungle! I have also heard that Leidloff has been slightly misleading in that, although the Yequana babies did not kill themselves playing with the knives that are 'lying around', she did neglect to mention that many of them are scarred.... Basically, it's worth reading, but use your instincts and remember you are bringing up your child in a totally different world to the one discussed here, although I do believe that babies thrive on this concept of parenting. Read Deborah Jackson to get a more realistic take on it.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback