The Zero Theorem 2013 Subtitles

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A computer hacker's goal to discover the reason for human existence continually finds his work interrupted thanks to the Management; this time, they send a teenager and lusty love interest to distract him

Starring:
Melanie Thierry, Christoph Waltz
Rental Formats:
DVD, Blu-ray

Product Details

Discs
  • Feature ages_15_and_over
Runtime 1 hour 46 minutes
Starring Melanie Thierry, Christoph Waltz, Mélanie Thierry, Lucas Hedges, Tilda Swinton, Ben Whishaw, David Thewlis
Director Terry Gilliam
Genres Drama, Science Fiction
Studio Sony Pictures
Rental release 18 August 2014
Main languages English
Dubbing Spanish
Subtitles Finnish, Spanish, Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, English, Hindi
Hearing impaired subtitles English
Discs
  • Feature ages_15_and_over
Runtime 1 hour 46 minutes
Starring Melanie Thierry, Christoph Waltz, Mélanie Thierry, Lucas Hedges, Tilda Swinton, Ben Whishaw, David Thewlis
Director Terry Gilliam
Genres Drama, Science Fiction
Studio Sony Pictures
Rental release 18 August 2014
Main languages English
Dubbing Spanish
Subtitles Finnish, Spanish, Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, English, Hindi
Hearing impaired subtitles English

Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Blu-ray
Was dreading watching this all year after hearing very shaky things about it, and being quite a big Gilliam fan since my childhood.

I'm glad to discover it's not as bad as I thought it was going to be...but still not as great as it could've been. It was almost like Twelve Monkeys with a lower budget, and ailed by similar inflections to my most hated Gilliam film - other than The Brothers Grimm whose existence I just simply ignore - The Imaginarium of Dr Parnassus. It wasn't very funny, and I'm not sure the Brazil-esque satire was at all needed for something like this. He should've gone full-on campy adventure, or more subtle and toned-down melodrama. He clearly wanted both, and I don't think it works.

Some decent performances from the usual suspects - particularly from Lucas Hedges, who you might recognise as 'Redford' (hilariously on-point character naming there) from Wes Anderson's Moonrise Kingdom - but I wished to have seen more fleshed-out parts for Damon, Swinton, Thewlis, and the briefly-featured Bhaskar, Whishaw and Stormare. Waltz was fine in his part, but I'm not sure neurotic suits him so well (Tarantino and Polanski have brought out his best to date).

But yeah, cyberpunk is not cool anymore. I'm not sure it ever was. I always thought somebody should notify the Wachowski's, Skrillex (cringe) and whoever still goes to Burning Man but I didn't think we'd have to tell Gilliam that too.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Richard Morton on 6 Dec. 2014
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
Directed by the always unique Terry Gilliam, The Zero Theorem is a strange mess of ideas which added up to an entertaining slice of the bizarre, if you like this kind of thing (I do).

The plot, for what it's worth, finds Christoph Waltz playing Quohen, a socially awkward computer genius in a cluttered neon future. He is tasked by the "management" of his current employment to solve the zero theorem and effectively prove the meaning or meaninglessness of life (or something like that anyway). On his quest he encounters various oddball characters amusingly played by the supporting cast - David Thewlis being a standout for me.

It all looks great as you'd expect from a Gilliam flick - this alt-world is well realised, kind of similar in tone and style to one of Gilliams best films, Brazil. Waltz is excellent in the eccentric lead role, he's in basically every scene and carries the load well.

The film is strange though and has so many ideas and questions being thrown around without necessarily having all the answers as it moves towards a head scratching conclusion. It's relatively slow moving as well so it's not going to be to everybody's tastes I would think. I'm a fan of Gilliam though and the journey was entertaining enough to make this worth it. Probably the best film of his since Twelve Monkeys I reckon.
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25 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Richard Chiles on 12 Mar. 2014
Format: DVD
Gilliam's most Gilliam film since Twelve Monkeys. It's a happy mess, and feels like a modern day Brazil. It starts weird, becomes oddly conventional for the middle third as it finds it's feet, then goes off the rails for the finale. Christoph Waltz is endlessly watchable as the poor sap plugged into a fast-paced modern life, Lucas Hedges holds his own as he channels Brad Pitt from Twelve Monkeys, while David Thewlis seems to be updating Johnny from Naked with a chemically induced love of life in a Gilliam world gone mad.
Strictly for Gilliam devotees, the film feels rushed, disjointed, but so many ideas are thrown at the screen that some do stick with you after. And Melanie Thierry is a revelation. It's no Brazil, however.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By It Stinks on 10 Sept. 2014
Format: DVD
In the extras the author admits that changes were made to the story that they said they really liked, I don't know his story but I know that Gilliam sometimes can't leave things well enough alone and wants to keep piling stuff on.
The trouble is that at times it hits a point when I just get fed up with the attempts at organised chaos on the screen and give up on the film.
Still love Brazil, didn't care for 12 Monkeys or this.
Christoph Waltz looking like a young Uncle Fester just distracts.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Call me Al TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 8 Jan. 2015
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This is not your typical SF film and Terry Gilliam is not your typical SF director. If you watch The Zero Theorem with an open mind there is much to enjoy. Gilliam has always excelled in creating his own bizarre dystopian worlds and in this one Christopher Waltz plays Qohen Leth, a troubled recluse living in a converted church but having to work as a computer programmer for Mancom, an authoritarian technology company. The management of the company grants Qohen's request to work at home on the condition that he devotes his time to trying to solve the meaning of life though computational mathematics using Mancom's supercomputer. The film is similar to Gilliam's masterpiece Brazil in that the protagonist escapes his unpalatable surroundings by entering an imagined virtual world, but the tone is lighter with deliberate touches of warmth and humour. If you are an admirer of Gilliam's films you probably have already seen it. If not, I would certainly recommend giving this unique film a go, remembering not to expect any simple answers to the questions posed.
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Format: DVD
Watching this reminded me of how good the scenary in Blade Runner was, as here the effects at times are poor or meant to be poor i.e. rundown estates in a street in Romania with graphics added. The ideas were like William Burroughs cut-up and Aldous Huxley's Brave New World. The star was Melanie Thierry making everyday sex appeal look flawless, she was stunning. At times I wanted all the story inside the church as a minimalist play, however the virtual sex/love scenes were fantastic. This review feels like the movie, ideas everywhere and nowhere chaotic and calm. The best things make no sense, especially as the meaning of life is unknown, we will die and then what...so glad these questions are asked and answered in this way: existence before essence.
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