The Zero Theorem 2014

Amazon Instant Video

(28) IMDb 6.2/10
Available in HD

From visionary director Terry Gilliam (Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus), The Zero Theorem stars two-time Academy Award®winner* Christoph Waltz (Django Unchained, Inglourious Basterds) as Qohen Leth, an eccentric and reclusive computer genius plagued with existential angst. Living in isolation in a burnt-out church, Qohen is obsessively working on a mysterious...

Starring:
Christoph Waltz, Mélanie Thierry
Runtime:
1 hour 46 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices

The Zero Theorem

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Product Details

Genres Science Fiction
Director Terry Gilliam
Starring Christoph Waltz, Mélanie Thierry
Supporting actors David Thewlis
Studio Amplify
BBFC rating Suitable for 15 years and over
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mr. R. A. Thompson on 18 Sep 2014
Format: Blu-ray
Version I saw: UK cinema release
Actors: 7/10
Plot/script: 7/10
Photography/visual style: 7/10
Music/score: 6/10
Overall: 7/10
Terry Gilliam is, in my opinion, up there with the greatest directors of all time, but a combination of bad fortune and ambition that overreaches his budgets means that Hollywood no longer trusts him with a big budget. Instead, he has been forced to look to Europe, where they are more tolerant of eccentricity, although there is also less money available.
The Zero Theorem is his latest offering, with a budget low enough that financiers are willing to gamble it on him. As a result, the cast is meagre, but Gilliam's artistic kudos means he can still draw names. Current in-demand actor Christoph Waltz stars as Qohen Leth, a somewhat autistic loner who seizes on a new project that allows him to work at home and never leave his (massively Gilliam-esque) former church dwelling. However, he is disturbed by a computer whizz-kid teenager and an alluring sex worker (played by relative newcomers Lucas Hedges and Melanie Thierry respectively), both of whom have been sent to him by the company for unclear reasons. Then there's the ever-excellent David Thewlis as his banal, somewhat simple-minded supervisor, and Matt Damon as the enigmatic, God-like figure (he explicitly states that he is not God more than once, but I suspect that in Gilliam's mind, that is exactly what God *would* say) known only as 'Management'.
It's a bit of an undisciplined mess: the plot and narrative direction get lost as early as a quarter of the way in, but the whole holds itself together thanks to top acting performances by all the main players.
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22 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Richard Chiles on 12 Mar 2014
Format: DVD
Gilliam's most Gilliam film since Twelve Monkeys. It's a happy mess, and feels like a modern day Brazil. It starts weird, becomes oddly conventional for the middle third as it finds it's feet, then goes off the rails for the finale. Christoph Waltz is endlessly watchable as the poor sap plugged into a fast-paced modern life, Lucas Hedges holds his own as he channels Brad Pitt from Twelve Monkeys, while David Thewlis seems to be updating Johnny from Naked with a chemically induced love of life in a Gilliam world gone mad.
Strictly for Gilliam devotees, the film feels rushed, disjointed, but so many ideas are thrown at the screen that some do stick with you after. And Melanie Thierry is a revelation. It's no Brazil, however.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jeff on 7 Sep 2014
Format: DVD
There are a lot of things to praise in this movie: an impressive futuristic setting, some striking visuals and some top notch acting. Particular mention for Melanie Thierry and Tilda Swinton as the shrink. My overriding feeling after watching it was confusion. I found my attention wandering at various points along the way, and I couldn't honestly say I completely understood what was going on throughout. Was a bit divided between moments of being captivated, and moments of indifference. If you're a Terry Gilliam fan you should have no complaints, but I think this is one that will divide opinion!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By indielense on 27 July 2014
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
another great film from Terry , who should continue to make these kind of films . just wish he could have another 12 monkeys to get more finance fro great film gems like this .
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By It Stinks on 10 Sep 2014
Format: DVD
In the extras the author admits that changes were made to the story that they said they really liked, I don't know his story but I know that Gilliam sometimes can't leave things well enough alone and wants to keep piling stuff on.
The trouble is that at times it hits a point when I just get fed up with the attempts at organised chaos on the screen and give up on the film.
Still love Brazil, didn't care for 12 Monkeys or this.
Christoph Waltz looking like a young Uncle Fester just distracts.
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By Mr. R. W. Graham TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 29 Aug 2014
Format: DVD
Quohen is an eccentric computer genius living alone in an abandoned church and given the task of discovering the meaning of life by his boss, the mysterious management. Director Terry Gilliam's latest is a very strange, visually spectacular scifi fantasy film with an excellent performance from Christoph Waltz as Quohen. Not quite one of Gilliam's best films but is ambitious and probably for Gilliam or perhaps Christoph Waltz fans only.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful By R. J. Lister on 17 Mar 2014
Format: DVD
There's a black hole swirling at the bottom of Qohen Leth's (Christoph Waltz) soul. He's waiting for a phone call from God, explaining the point of it all. Because at the moment it seems like existence is an erroneous quirk in the cosmic standard of nothingness. Everything will return to nothing, so why make something of life? Love, in the form of romance (Melanie Thierry as Bainsley), friendship (David Thewlis), and parenthood (Lucas Hedges) provides Qohen with the answers, but he's too absorbed in his work on the "Zero Theorem" to accept it.

There are elements of David Cronenberg's Cosmopolis in Qohen's philosophical quest, in the oddball characters he meets along the way, and his perennial absence of feeling. And in the Zen imagery of a nude Waltz spiralling through the void, there's a bit of Darren Aronofsky's The Fountain. Both of those films were more coherent and emotionally engaging than The Zero Theorem, although Terry Gilliam's film grows on you, once you accept that it's not Brazil Part II. There are definite touches of Gilliam's 1985 masterpiece here, particularly the awkward marrying of archaic and ultra-modern technologies. But don't expect a script of Tom Stoppard wit, swerve, and clarity.

Waltz is a fantastic presence - which is necessary, because most of the story plays out in his home: an echochamber of a converted church, whose baptismal font now serves as a washing up bowl. We see him at work, attempting to order the universe via a 3D game block game, fighting against entropy; against the inevitable demise of conscious matter and with it the question: What does it all mean? The problem is, he's waiting for an answer. The very point is uncertainty, the propulsive force of our species.
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