Buy Used
£3.12
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Sold by owlsmart_usa
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Good clean copy with no missing pages might be an ex library copy; may contain marginal notes and or highlighting
Trade in your item
Get a £0.34
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Writer's Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers Paperback – Oct 1998


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£3.04

There is a newer edition of this item:


Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • When you trade in £15 or more you’ll receive an additional £5 Amazon.co.uk Gift Card for the next time you spend £10 or more.


Trade In this Item for up to £0.34
Trade in The Writer's Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £0.34, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Michael Wiese Productions; 2nd edition edition (Oct. 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0941188701
  • ISBN-13: 978-0941188708
  • Product Dimensions: 15.3 x 1.9 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 266,140 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
8
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
1
See all 9 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

47 of 51 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 7 Jun. 1999
Format: Paperback
As the sages say, "When the student is ready, the teacher will come." I was ready for this important book, after successfully writing for nearly 20 years, and learned more about the process than in all the courses and workshops I've attended. I highly recommend the book. I'm encouraging my writing students, colleagues and writing friends to get a copy. If you write, you need to read this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
73 of 80 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 6 Oct. 1998
Format: Paperback
Telling a story relies on three levels of contract between writer and reader. One contract you learn on your own, one in school, and one is the subject of "The Writer's Journey".
The fundamental contract when writing English is the meaning of words. I can convey the idea of a tree simply by writing "tree". Because we agree on the general meaning of words, my thoughts can travel through English into your mind.
The second level of contract, which we learn intuitively and study in school, is grammar. Grammar is a loose set of rules that lets me write either "George chopped down the tree" or "George chopped the tree down" with equivalent meaning. I can even bend the rules, and write "Down chopped George the tree". But, if I abandon the rules of grammar entirely and write "Chopped tree down the George", communication falters. Grammar is a higher level of contract than the meaning of words, and oddly is the highest level of contract taught through most schools. "The Writer's Journey" explains the next level of contract, the rules that let a writer communicate a story to a reader.
"The Writer's Journey" details the one primary pattern that makes a list of sentences feel like a story. Once you understand the pattern, you will begin to see it brought to life in story after story. Trying to write without understanding this basic pattern is as difficult as writing without understanding grammar. Like grammar, most readers learn the rules of storytelling intuitively. And, like grammar, the writer must learn these rules consciously to make the best use of them. Christopher Vogler elevates the intuitive understanding of story to a conscious level, and for that this book is indispensable.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Sem on 20 July 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Once I started this book I couldn't put it down. It is a suprisingly simple way of looking at a scripts structure, working out who your character is and where they belong. I would recommend this book to any budding script writer.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Jean Erasmus on 29 Sept. 2007
Format: Paperback
A great book not just for writers and film makers, but for everyone. Based on the Monomyth concept as populirized by comparative mythologist Joseph Campbell, the book explores the subconsious archetypal world of the mysterious human mind, and show how it could be used to compose better fiction.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 11 Nov. 1998
Format: Paperback
This is one of the most satisfying books I've ever read, and should be for you also, if you have an interest in writing movie scipts. Vogler describes all the main components of story-telling, and how those elements fit into a screen play. I understand that this book is a standard text for screenplay writers.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback