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The World Is Not Enough [DVD] [1999]

165 customer reviews

Price: £3.20 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
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Frequently Bought Together

The World Is Not Enough [DVD] [1999] + Tomorrow Never Dies [DVD] [1997] + Die Another Day - Special Edition [DVD] [2002]
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Product details

  • Actors: Pierce Brosnan, Sophie Marceau, Robert Carlyle, Denise Richards, Robbie Coltrane
  • Directors: Michael Apted
  • Writers: Bruce Feirstein, Ian Fleming, Neal Purvis, Robert Wade
  • Producers: Anthony Waye, Barbara Broccoli, Michael G. Wilson
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English
  • Subtitles For The Hearing Impaired: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 12
  • Studio: MGM
  • DVD Release Date: 3 Nov. 2003
  • Run Time: 127 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (165 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00004SH52
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 8,653 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

DVD Special Features :

Audio Commentary featuring Director Michael Apted
Second Audio Commentary featuring Production Designer Peter Lamont, Second Unit Director Vic Armstrong and Composer David Arnold
The Making of "The World is Not Enough" Documentary
"Bond Cocktail" Documentary
"Bond Down River" Documentary
The Secrets of 007
Music Video by Garbage
Original Theatrical Trailer
Tribute to Desmond Llewelyn
PlayStation Game Trailer
Collectable Booklet
English Subtitles
2.35:1 widescreen
Dolby Digital

From Amazon.co.uk

In his 19th screen outing The World is Not Enough, Ian Fleming's super-spy is once again caught in the crosshairs of a self-created dilemma: as the longest-running feature-film franchise, James Bond is an annuity his producers want to protect, yet the series' consciously formulaic approach frustrates any real element of surprise beyond the rote application of plot twists or jump cuts to shake up the audience. This time out, credit 007's caretakers for making some visible attempts to invest their principal characters with darker motives--and blame them for squandering The World is Not Enough's initial promise by the final reel. By now, Bond pictures are as elegantly formal as a Bach chorale, and this one opens on an unusually powerful note. A stunning pre-title sequence reaches beyond mere pyrotechnics to introduce key plot elements as the action leaps from Bilbao to London. Pierce Brosnan undercuts his usually suave persona with a darker, more brutal edge largely absent since Sean Connery departed. Equally tantalising are our initial glimpses of Bond's nemesis du jour, Renard (Robert Carlyle), and imminent love interest, Elektra King (Sophie Marceau), both atypically complex characters cast with seemingly shrewd choices and directed by the capable Michael Apted. The story's focus on post-Soviet geopolitics likewise starts off on a savvy note, before being overtaken by increasingly Byzantine plot twists, hidden motives and reversals of loyalty superheated by relentless (if intermittently perfunctory) action sequences.

Bond's grimmer demeanour, while preferable to the smirk that eventually swallowed Roger Moore whole, proves wearying, unrelieved by any true wit. The underlying psychoses that propel Renard and Elektra eventually unravel into unconvincing melodrama, while Bond is supplied with a secondary love object, Denise Richards, who is even more improbable as a nuclear physicist. Ultimately, this world is not enough despite its better intentions. --Sam Sutherland, Amazon.com

On the DVD: There are three different documentaries on this disc, as well as a "Secrets of 007" featurette that cuts between specific stunt sequences, behind-the-scenes footage and storyboards to reveal how it was all done, and a short video tribute to Desmond Llewelyn ("Q"), who died not long after this movie was released. The first "making of" piece is presented by an annoyingly chirpy American woman and is aimed squarely at the MTV market (most fascinating is watching her interview with Denise Richards in which the two orthodontically enhanced ladies attempt to out-smile each other). "Bond Cocktail" gamely distils all the essential ingredients that make up the classic Bond movie formula--gadgets, girls, exotic locations and lots of action. Most interesting of all is "Bond Down River", a lengthy dissection of the opening boat chase sequence. Director Michael Apted provides the first commentary, and talks about the challenges of delivering all the requisite ingredients. The second commentary is less satisfactory, since second unit director Vic Armstrong, production designer Peter Lamont and composer David Arnold have little in common. There's also the Garbage song video, and the booklet has yet more behind-the-scenes info. The anamorphic CinemaScope picture and Dolby digital sound are as spectacular as ever. --Mark Walker

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Spike Owen TOP 500 REVIEWER on 28 April 2011
Format: DVD
Bond is required to protect a female oil magnate from potential assassination, but it soon becomes apparent that something far bigger and sinister is around the corner.

Pierce Brosnan returns for his third turn as super suave spy James Bond and all the crucial elements for the franchise are firmly in place. From the exhilarating pre-credit sequence down the river Thames to the glorious over the top explosive finale, this is a Bond film for those that enjoy the cheeky action led mania over thought and depth. Into the Bondian mix are the usual stalwarts; Judi Dench as M, Samantha Bond as Moneypenny, Desmond Llewelyn as Q {bidding a sad farewell to the franchise with a poignant moment} and Robbie Coltrane returns as Zukovsky. Bond girl duties fall to Sophie Marceau {beautiful and solid} and Denise Richards {sexy, elfin like, but out of her depth} and the psycho for hire role lands at the considerably fine feet of Robert Carlyle, even if the latter is badly underused.

The World Is Not Enough {the Bond family motto} is a whizz bang entry in the series and finds Brosnan well settled in the role; nailing the multitude of traits that make Bond a man that women want to bed and a man that men want to be. It is, however, in spite of its excellent action set pieces, rather shallow and all too aware of wanting to appease Bond fans across the spectrum. Thus the comedy moments come off as saggy and the more scientific aspects {as gloriously ridiculous as they are} feel more like auto-pilot plotting. Still, you get what you pay for with 90s Bond, so after the mixed Tomorrow Never Dies the makers were clearly intent on taking the fans on a ripper of a ride, and no doubt about it, they achieve that in spades. With the two hour running time just flying by. They of course would take it one step too far three years later with the nadir that was Die Another Day, thus making this the last good Bond film before Daniel Craig's fabulous re-invention arrived in 2006. 7/10
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Victor HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 10 Jan. 2011
Format: DVD
After the fun and entertaining `Goldeneye' and `Tomorrow Never Dies', this film sees Pierce Brosnan appearing for the third time as James Bond in the nineteenth big screen outing for the superspy. Sadly, this was to be Desmond Llewellyn's last appearance as Q.

After a wealthy industrialist is assassinated in MI6's headquarters, Bond is assigned to protect his daughter from the same fate. What follows in a tale of deceit and deception involving oil pipelines, psychopathic terrorists, nuclear submarines and caviar.

This, for me, was a bit of a drop in form for the classic Bond series. Brosnan is very good in the role and does his best with the material given to him to make Bond as believable and interesting a character as possible. But he is really up against it with the poor quality of the script and the bad direction. The plot makes little sense, and the script too full of bad jokes. The appearance of John Cleese as Q's replacement is silly and a particular low point. My biggest problem is the villain. Robert Carlyle, a great actor and one who could really make a classic sinister villain is wasted as the cartoonish super villain - impervious to pain and super strong - that we are presented with. It is just so over the top that the character loses any credibility, and hence there is no thrill of danger when Bond comes up against him.

That is not to say there are no good points - the action sequences, though a little silly when compared to previous films, are well directed and the big stunts impress. There is a top quality cast, including Carlyle, Judi Dench and Sophie Marceau giving it their all, and largely due to their talents it manages to entertain for about half the time.

An OK film. Not Bond's best, but not his worst. Three stars.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Victor HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 10 Jan. 2011
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
After the fun and entertaining `Goldeneye' and `Tomorrow Never Dies', this film sees Pierce Brosnan appearing for the third time as James Bond in the nineteenth big screen outing for the superspy. Sadly, this was to be Desmond Llewellyn's last appearance as Q.

After a wealthy industrialist is assassinated in MI6's headquarters, Bond is assigned to protect his daughter from the same fate. What follows in a tale of deceit and deception involving oil pipelines, psychopathic terrorists, nuclear submarines and caviar.

This, for me, was a bit of a drop in form for the classic Bond series. Brosnan is very good in the role and does his best with the material given to him to make Bond as believable and interesting a character as possible. But he is really up against it with the poor quality of the script and the bad direction. The plot makes little sense, and the script too full of bad jokes. The appearance of John Cleese as Q's replacement is silly and a particular low point. My biggest problem is the villain. Robert Carlyle, a great actor and one who could really make a classic sinister villain is wasted as the cartoonish super villain - impervious to pain and super strong - that we are presented with. It is just so over the top that the character loses any credibility, and hence there is no thrill of danger when Bond comes up against him.

That is not to say there are no good points - the action sequences, though a little silly when compared to previous films, are well directed and the big stunts impress. There is a top quality cast, including Carlyle, Judi Dench and Sophie Marceau giving it their all, and largely due to their talents it manages to entertain for about half the time.

An OK film. Not Bond's best, but not his worst. Three stars.
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