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The World As Will and Representation Hardcover – Jun 1969

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Product details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Peter Smith Pub Inc (Jun. 1969)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0844628859
  • ISBN-13: 978-0844628851
  • Product Dimensions: 7.6 x 14.6 x 22.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 6,796,908 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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62 of 63 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 30 Nov. 1998
Format: Paperback
Schopenhauer proves that a German philosopher does not have to be nearly unintelligible to appear profound. Unlike Hegel and Heidegger, Schopenhauer does not hide behind ambiguous words or phrases. To the reader, Schopenhauer's views are as profound as they are clear. Starting where Kant left off, he gives new meaning to the word will; he makes will the thing in itself. Both volumes are essential reading. The first offers his entire system. From epistemology to metaphysics, to a great essay on where his philosophy differs from Kant's, the first volume is the foundation for the second. The second volume is classic Schopenhauer; this is the acid-tongued curmudgeon most people think of when they bother to think of him at all. The sections on death and the metaphysics of sexual love are mind-blowing. As it is expressed in his masterpiece, The World as Will and Representation, Schopenhauer's genius and originality of thinking tower over the views of most thinkers being pushed in universities today.
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29 of 30 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 6 July 1998
Format: Paperback
In the dogmatic rigid world of academic philosophy, rarely are "outsiders" fully appreciated. Especially when capable of lucid and lively expository skills. Schopenauer's well known and explicit challenge of Hegel as the legitimate heir to Kant doomed him to a minor status in his lifetime. However, his insights and doctrines have provided much material incorporated by others, such as Nietzche, Freud, Jung. His recognition of the legitimacy of Oriental thought preceded Western appreciation as well. For those willing to devote the time to a thorough reading, a full and comprehensive world view emerges. The role of the unconscious, the dualities in the struggle between reason and emotion, the valuation of a pragmatic but compassionate ethic are some of the still worthy expositions in his opus. Allowing for some of the local references and historical context, a true and lasting example of real philosophizing as it was envisioned in classical Greek tradition.The pursuit of truth and knowledge as an end worthy of devotion. Maybe he was a bit of a cranky eccentric, but he was a true individual who dared to pursue his own insights to their logical conclusions.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Mr. E. J. Leoni-smith on 23 Dec. 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Schopenhauer is generally regarded as a 'correction to Kant' and that is very true.

As Kants Critique starts well, and ends in a floundering mess of complexity, Schopenhauer picks up the thread and with - amazingly - wit and verve accepts Kant's basic position, and then goes on to clarify it, before too floundering into a bit of a mess at the end.

It's not surprising- metaphysics is always thinking about thinking, and that's a hard - possibly the hardest - thing to achieve clarity at.

If you aren't interested in Metaphysics why are you reading this review?

If you are, then this is a must have for the collection. And its a good translation too.

Schopenhauer is often dismissed these days. Don't. He's good and he's sharp. Understand what he tries to say and make your own mind up.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Halifax Student Account on 27 Jun. 2010
Format: Paperback
Imagine a parallel universe were William Shakespeare was known but completely ignored and Marlow and Pope and Dryden say, were taught in universities but Shakespeare was completely uncared for and unloved and, worst still, trivialized and miss-labelled as a rubbish mind. The latest academic is peddling his latest poetry tome for the fooled public whist poor William Shakespeare is gathering dust on some oblivious bookshelves in the vacuous void of Leeds Central Library. William Shakespeare's poetry and plays are hovering at the 1 million mark in the Amazon book charts but the latest popular rubbish is riding high in the top 100 charts. How frustrating.

Well this is happening to Arthur Schopenhauer.
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29 of 36 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 18 May 2001
Format: Hardcover
Without a doubt one of the most important books ever written. To be sure, Schopenhauer will be anathema to many people. But if you are interested in what is really going on in life you can't miss it. It is astonishing to me how many well educated people don't know this book. Believe me, you will not be the same person afterwards.
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17 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Oliver Jackson on 6 April 2008
Format: Paperback
The World as Will and Representation is Schopenhauer's major work, intended as a systematic philosophy to go beyond the limits of Kantian critique. It is perhaps because he is judged by this standard that Schopenhauer largely remains a marginal figure in mainstream academic philosophy, a footnote to Kant and Hegel, and worthy perhaps of inclusion in prefatory remarks on Nietzsche. But it is a shame to miss the real originality and insight of his thought and particularly that on art and ethics.

The first two parts of the book deal with matters of the nature of reality and what we can know of it. Schopenhauer here advances arguments that may be rather dry and technical for the layman reader - though certainly far less intimidating than Kant, and often illustrated with illuminating examples - and that collapse under the mildest philosophical scrutiny. But they provide the basis for a rethinking of the nature of man that would be profoundly influential. In Schopenhauer is the idea of man as fundamentally governed by impersonal drives. The idea of philosophy as the study of the divine faculty of human reason - present at least up to Hegel - is here supplanted by an account that brings humans back to earth with a notion of Will that would anticipate Nietzsche's Will to Power along with Freud's theory of the unconscious. What follows is a brilliantly pessimistic account of life as a ceaseless, vain striving after temporary pleasures - but also a sketch of possible redemption in the renunciation of the will and in the contemplation of art. These are the passages that make the text worth reading, creating from the carefully observed analyses of the life of the will a more complete picture of the human being, and bringing to light the possibility of escaping the banality of brute existence.
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