The Woman in the Picture and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £12.99
  • You Save: £0.91 (7%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Woman in the Picture has been added to your Basket
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Perfect quality, no marks or missing pages. Fast, secure shipment from the Amazon warehouse.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Woman in the Picture Hardcover – 3 Jul 2014

15 customer reviews

See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£12.08
£5.83 £5.82
Audio CD, Audiobook, Unabridged
"Please retry"
£12.08 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Win a £5,000 Amazon.co.uk Gift Card for your child's school by voting for their favourite book. Learn more.
  • Prepare for the summer with our pick of the best selection for children (ages 0 - 12) across Amazon.co.uk.

Frequently Bought Together

The Woman in the Picture + The Crimson Rooms + The Alchemist's Daughter
Price For All Three: £27.26

Buy the selected items together


Win a £5,000 Amazon.co.uk Gift Card and 30 Kindle E-readers for your child or pupil's school.
Vote for your child or pupil(s) favourite book(s) here to be in with a chance to win.

Product details

  • Hardcover: 368 pages
  • Publisher: W&N (3 July 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0297866036
  • ISBN-13: 978-0297866039
  • Product Dimensions: 16.1 x 3.5 x 23.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 88,745 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

The author of The Crimson Rooms returns with this sequel, a Mitford-style 1920s thriller. (RED MAGAZINE)

No matter the era, professional women always struggle to balance that old chestnut - love versus a career. If you think you've got it bad now, just imagine living in the 1920s and being one of the first women to qualify as a solicitor... (GRAZIA)

I'm hooked by Evelyn and those around her and I love the sense of the period. Katharine McMahon is a great storyteller. (NIAMH CUSACK)

You'll immediately fall for Evelyn, the lead girl in The Woman in the Picture... (COMPANY MAGAZINE)

Evelyn is a brave, intelligent character, especially given the sexism of the times, and you will find yourself rooting for her and the people she defends. (WOMAN MAGAZINE)

This novel's skilfully crafted atmosphere draws the reader in from the first page, and the protagonist's compassion for the people she defends is impressive. The cases she becomes embroiled in are interesting, but the love story is the most gripping part. McMahon is a talented writer whose twists will keep you turning pages. It can be easy to forget that not so long ago, women were still fighting to be taken granted in the workplace 0 this book reminds us it was not in vain. (THE LADY)

The roaring 20s are brought fizzingly to life in Katharine McMahon's The Woman in the Picture. This elegant story about a feisty young woman torn between head and heart is absorbing and atmospheric. (GOODHOUSEKEEPING)

This great, heart-stopping page-turned is the sequel to the wonderful The Crimson Rooms.. ....private and professional struggles play themselves out against the canvas of a wider social conflict, the 1926 General Strike; and the novel fairly steams with boiled-wool period atmosphere. McMahon is the mistress of telling contrasts, and of charged, passionate and beautifully crafted prose. (Wendy Holden DAILY MAIL)

McMahon juggles her many plotlines with such skill...A richly entertaining yarn. (READERS DIGEST)

The roaring 20s are brought fizzingly to life in Katharine McMahon's The Woman in the Picture. This elegant story about a feisty young woman torn between head and heart is absorbing and atmospheric. (GOOD HOUSEKEEPING)

Book Description

The page-turning sequel to THE CRIMSON ROOMS by the author of bestselling Richard & Judy Book Club pick, THE ROSE OF SEBASTOPOL.

Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Blue Moon on 24 July 2014
Format: Hardcover
I had been looking forward to this book after reading the synopsis, courtroom drama, General Strike and characters who sounded interesting. I felt let down by the plotting. I guessed far too early in the book two major plots and this cast a cloud on my enjoyment. However this was a well written book and the facts about the General Strike I found very interesting. I do read a lot of crime fiction so I'm always looking for clues when I read. I think that most readers will really enjoy this book, so don't be put off by my personal view.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Susie B TOP 50 REVIEWER on 3 July 2014
Format: Hardcover
It is 1926, we are in London, and Evelyn Gifford, one of Britain's first female solicitors, has taken on a case that other lawyers might think twice about. She is about to defend Lady Petit, who is being sued by her husband, Timothy Petit, a prominent member of parliament, for divorce; Timothy Petit is also denying the paternity of their three-year-old daughter, Annice, and is claiming the marriage was never consummated. Advised by her boss, Daniel Breen, not to accept the case, Evelyn, keen to prove her worth and concerned for the Petit child, decides to go ahead, but she soon realizes that the case is going to be a very difficult one - especially when she learns that her former love, Nicholas Thorne, is acting for Timothy Petit. Matters at home are also causing Evelyn some unsettled moments; her flatmate, Meredith, an artist and the mother of her beloved nephew, Edmund, is planning on leaving for France and taking Edmund with her; her aunt Prudence, a very capable woman who has been living with and supporting Evelyn's difficult mother is off to India; and then Daniel Breen confesses he has fallen in love with Evelyn, while she is still trying to get over her love affair with Nicholas Thorne. And now that Nicholas Thorne is back in Evelyn's life will she be able to forget the past and move forward into a relationship with Daniel? Or will the passionate feelings she once had for Nicholas pull her back into his orbit? (No spoilers, we learn all of this and more early on in the novel and there is plenty more for prospective readers to discover). Alongside her work on the Petit case, Evelyn also becomes involved with the Wright family, particularly Mrs Wright, a battered wife, who is soon very much in need of Evelyn's professional and moral support.Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By L. H. Healy TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 16 July 2014
Format: Hardcover
Set in London in 1926, this novel features Evelyn Gifford, who we first met in an earlier novel by Katharine McMahon, The Crimson Rooms. Now one of the first female qualified solicitors, Evelyn’s brother was killed in WWI and she is living with her young nephew and his mother Meredith. Two cases dominate the storyline; one regarding disputed paternity and another regarding union strikes. In her personal life, too, Evelyn faces challenges, decisions and conflicts, with the chance of happiness with a man who admires and loves her, and yet the lure of a past lover returned.

The Woman in the Picture is another beautifully written historical novel by Katharine McMahon, with super characterisation; it’s wonderful to revisit Evelyn and discover her current endeavours – though this novel can certainly be read without having read The Crimson Rooms. The narrative offers a compelling portrait of a time when a female lawyer was unusual and the preconceptions and judgements Evelyn therefore faces from others in the profession and from the general population.

The story moves along at a good pace, both the legal matters and the romantic aspects are intriguing and held my interest. The author has a skillful and elegant way with language and incorporates convincing authentic period detail. I think anyone who enjoys well-written historical fiction with an engaging, intelligent plot and an element of romance, and in particular if you like to read about a strong, independent female central character, will find a lot to love in this novel.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Helena Halme on 6 Aug. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
What's not to like? There's a feisty female lawyer in 1920s London, a woman working hard to forge a career in a male dominated profession, at a time when all young women were expected to wish for was a good husband. There's a handsome ex-lover, a shocking family secret, two courtroom dramas with wronged women from the opposite ends of the social class, and a general strike. I thoroughly enjoyed this novel and will now download other books by Katharine McMahon!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Barney,smum on 7 April 2015
Format: Kindle Edition
To get the most from this book, you should read the crimson room first as the main characters and their relationships are all well developed in this sequel. Evie is continuing her career as a pioneering solicitor in a m ale dominated profession , sharing a dingy flat with her dead brother,s lover Meredith and son and recovering from a disastrous love affair.

Her current case is the defence of a young housemaid Trudy Wright who is accused of theft from her employer. As Evie tries to help Trudie and her family she finds herself defending one of them for murder.

She is also asked to take on a high profile paternity case against all advice. This ends in disaster for her personally and professionally

The hardships and betrayals of the1926 General strike are brought to life throughout the book and the period has been well researched.

Her complicated relationship with her mother, a new love and the reappearance of an old lover make this an enjoyable page turner.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback