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The Witch's Trinity

3.2 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: ISIS Audio Books (1 July 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 075313263X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0753132630
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)

Product Description

Review

'An absorbing and rewarding tale unfolds Bewitching. (Weekend Gold Coast Bulletin)

An absorbing and rewarding tale unfolds Bewitching. (Weekend Gold Coast Bulletin)

Psychologically shrewd; it illustrates not only the psychological mechanics of scapegoating and projection - but also the interpersonal dynamics of family relationships - There's also some subtle and intelligent use of the heroine Gude as a sympathetic but not entirely reliable narrator.' (Sydney Morning Herald)

Psychologically shrewd; it illustrates not only the psychological mechanics of scapegoating and projection - but also the interpersonal dynamics of family relationships - There's also some subtle and intelligent use of the heroine Gude as a sympathetic but not entirely reliable narrator.' (Sydney Morning Herald)

The book's fictional approach is a wise choice as it allows Mailman to evoke feelings of terror in the accused [creating] a real sense of the hardened German spirit. (Border Mail)

'IF A BOOK CAN BEWITCH, THIS IS IT! The scenes of horror are varied and all handled with amazing skill. Witchery has never seemed so evil, so delicious, so unpleasantly real.' (Courier Mail) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

A gripping tale of betrayal and persecution set in the witch trials in sixteenth century Germany --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
With a stroke of her pen and a quote from the Malleus Maleficarum -the witch hunter's bible- Mailman plunges into a terrifying period of history, where superstition combines with ignorance and mass hysteria to accuse helpless women of witchcraft. Set in 1507 in the German village of Tierkenddorf, famine-starved neighbors cast covetous eyes on one another, their bellies empty and their minds fevered. In the home of Jost Muller, his wife, Irmeltrude resents each morsel shared with her elderly mother-in-law, Gude. Jost's son and daughter, silent, watch with widened eyes as Irmeltrude harries old Gude, one starless night pushing her from the hut, barring the door against the grandmother's return: "It was a winter to make bitter all souls."

Arriving in the village in response to a letter from the local lord, the stern-visaged Friar Johannes Fuchs, his voluminous black robes unfurling like wings against the snow, announces that he has come to purge this place of evil, the curse of witchcraft that has blighted the fields. The friar believes that just as "God punished the world with a flood... he is now punishing you with famine." Clearly witchcraft is at work. To discover and excise the source is to regain God's pleasure. All eyes fall on a solitary figure, Gude's girlhood friend, Kunne, now as bowed by age and hunger as the rest. An herbal healer, Kunne stands accused, neighbors stepping forward to complain of soured mild, hens that won't lay and barren wombs. Anguished, Gude watches as her dearest friend is stripped and burned on a pyre of wood, the village's lust for revenge temporarily sated.

But the famine does not abate.
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Format: Hardcover
The Witch's Trinity is set in Germany in the 1500's, at a time when witch hunting was rife. All it could take was one passing comment or half-hearted accusation, and a woman could be given a trial for witchcraft. A trial that she would be very unlikely to pass - and therefore be put to death by a brutal burning at the stake. And this is what happens in this book.

In the village of Tierkinddorf, the crops are failing, the animals are dying, and the people are panicking. They have no food and are slowly starving, their skin hanging from their bones. They are resorting to desperate measures to survive, as well as looking for someone to blame for their plight. So when a Dominican friar arrives in their village suggesting that the work of the devil is responsible for their problems, their search for a scapegoat becomes more focused. Now no woman is safe from pointing fingers. A hideous trial and burning soon take place... but the village's problems are far from over. It hasn't removed the problem. The people are still hungry, so begin to think the wrong person has been accused.

Old woman Gude, mother to Jost, feels sure she will be the next to be accused. As the last person of her age still living, she gets strange looks. It doesn't help that her daughter-in-law resents her for still being alive and having to feed her. As her resentment grows, Gude lives in fear of the accusation that will surely come... and presently, it does. What happens next is Gude's tale of her imprisonment, impending trial, and the aftermath.

This is a harrowing and gripping tale. The mix of Paganism and Christianity is fascinating, as the villagers are influenced to shake off their old ways and embrace God. But this becomes difficult indeed when food is scarce and lives are at risk.
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Format: Hardcover
I obviously didn't expect this book to be a light-hearted read, but I did still struggle with the darkness and desperation of it all. It's well written, if slightly repetitive in its primitive notions of life at that time - i got a little bit tired of the term 'rutting' which seemed to be included at every given opportunity! However, I warmed to it more as the story developed and was glad I persevered with it, although by no means would I describe it as a gripping read.
Incidentally, I really enjoyed reading about Erika Mailman's ancestor who had been accused of witchcraft within the Author's Note at the back of the book and in many ways I wonder if it might have made a more interesting story than the one written...
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By Manda Moo VINE VOICE on 16 Dec. 2011
Format: Paperback
Just couldn't get into this, the language annoyed me and the story just didn't keep my interest. It's not often that I give up on a book, but as there are plenty of other books in my pile that I really want to read I had to leave this one.
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Format: Paperback
The title really appealed to me as I really enjoy books set in this era and think it is important to understand how far women have come in their fight for equality. I liked that the story was told from the view point of an elderly lady as this is quite rare - normally stories are told from people in their prime, not when they are reaching the end of it! The description of what life was like then, the way famine changed people and the power of the church is very vivid and you really get a sense of how life was like then.
HOWEVER:
I don't want to spoil it for anyone who is thinking of reading the book, but I think that the author chickened out at the end and could have finished it on a more plausable note.

So, all in all, read it, enjoy it, but don't be surprised if you are left wanting!
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